Special Issue "Nanosystems as Drug Delivery Carrier: From Nature to the Medication"

A special issue of Pharmaceutics (ISSN 1999-4923). This special issue belongs to the section "Drug Delivery and Controlled Release".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 October 2020.

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Eduardo Sobarzo-Sánchez
Website SciProfiles
Guest Editor
1: Instituto de Investigación e Innovación en Salud, Facultad de Ciencias de la Salud, Universidad Central de Chile, Chile
2: Department of Organic Chemistry, Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Santiago de Compostela, Spain
Interests: drug delivery systems; medicinal chemistry; natural products
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues

In the field of research into nanomedicine, the synthesis of devices of molecular size by using various types of natural polymer like cyclodextrins has been intensively studied from a pharmacological point of view. Thus, research intp the scope of drug delivery systems has been focused on the transport of useful substances and active drugs, which, because of their insolubility in the bloodstream, limit the possibilities of medical treatment in the organism. From the formation of inclusion complexes to the formation of nanoparticles linked to natural or synthetic polymers, suprqamolecular systems have been successful because of their versatility at transporting small substances; their isolation; and their elimination of toxins, heavy elements, and molecules that, due to their physical-chemical characteristics, are difficult to handle in an aqueous environment.

Therefore, the possibility to receive research articles/reviews about the contribution of several drug delivery systems from natural or synthetic sources could help us to understand the importance of choosing nanocapsules, liposomes, or multiples structures to carry drugs under chemical effects in living systems.

Prof. Dr. Eduardo Sobarzo-Sánchez
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Pharmaceutics is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • drug delivery systems,
  • cyclodextrin,
  • nanomedicine,
  • active drugs,
  • bioavailability

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle
Topical Delivery of Meloxicam using Liposome and Microemulsion Formulation Approaches
Pharmaceutics 2020, 12(3), 282; https://doi.org/10.3390/pharmaceutics12030282 - 21 Mar 2020
Cited by 1
Abstract
The aim of this study is to develop, characterize and compare conventional liposome, deformable liposome (transfersome) and microemulsion formulations as potential topical delivery systems for meloxicam. Liposomes were characterized in terms of vesicle size, zeta potential and entrapment efficiency. For microemulsions, particle size, [...] Read more.
The aim of this study is to develop, characterize and compare conventional liposome, deformable liposome (transfersome) and microemulsion formulations as potential topical delivery systems for meloxicam. Liposomes were characterized in terms of vesicle size, zeta potential and entrapment efficiency. For microemulsions, particle size, electrical conductivity and viscosity studies were performed to assess the structure of the investigated systems. An ex vivo skin permeation study has been conducted to compare these formulations. The dermal and transdermal delivery of meloxicam using these formulations can be a promising alternative to conventional oral delivery of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) with enhanced local and systemic onset of action and reduced side effects. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanosystems as Drug Delivery Carrier: From Nature to the Medication)
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Review

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Open AccessReview
Nanopharmaceutics: Part I—Clinical Trials Legislation and Good Manufacturing Practices (GMP) of Nanotherapeutics in the EU
Pharmaceutics 2020, 12(2), 146; https://doi.org/10.3390/pharmaceutics12020146 - 11 Feb 2020
Cited by 11
Abstract
The latest advances in pharmaceutical technology are leading to the development of cutting edged approaches to produce what is now known as the “Holy Grail” of medicine—nanopharmaceutics. Over the latest decade, the pharmaceutical industry has made important contributions to the scale up of [...] Read more.
The latest advances in pharmaceutical technology are leading to the development of cutting edged approaches to produce what is now known as the “Holy Grail” of medicine—nanopharmaceutics. Over the latest decade, the pharmaceutical industry has made important contributions to the scale up of these new products. To ensure their quality, efficacy, and safety for human use, clinical trials are mandatory. Yet, regulation regarding nanopharmaceuticals is still limited with a set of guidelines being recently released with respect to compliance with quality and safety. For the coming years, updates on regulatory issues about nanopharmaceuticals and their use in clinical settings are expected. The use of nanopharmaceuticals in clinical trials depends on the approval of the production methods and assurance of the quality of the final product by implementation and verification of the good manufacturing practices (GMP). This review addresses the available legislation on nanopharmaceuticals within the European Union (EU), the GMP that should be followed for their production, and the current challenges encountered in clinical trials of these new formulations. The singular properties of nanopharmaceuticals over their bulk counterparts are associated with their size, matrix composition, and surface properties. To understand their relevance, four main clinical trial guidelines, namely, for intravenous iron-based nanopharmaceuticals, liposomal-based nanopharmaceuticals, block copolymer micelle-based nanopharmaceuticals, and related to surface coating requirements, are described here. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanosystems as Drug Delivery Carrier: From Nature to the Medication)
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