Special Issue "Biological Systematics of Tree Pathogenic Fungi"

A special issue of Pathogens (ISSN 2076-0817). This special issue belongs to the section "Fungal Pathogens".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (1 December 2019).

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Martin Coetzee
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Biochemistry, Genetics and Microbiology, Forestry and Agricultural Biotechnology Institute (FABI), University of Pretoria, 0028 Pretoria, South Africa
Interests: systematics; evolution and genomics of fungal tree pathogens

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Fungi are amongst the most important pathogens of trees and woody plants. Not only do they cause the death of susceptible tree hosts, but also, in the long-term, lead to ecosystem changes where these trees grew. Systematics provides invaluable information regarding the species relationships, evolutionary history, biogeography, and species diversity of these fungi. This information can subsequently be applied in disease and quarantine management strategies. The importance of the systematics of tree pathogenic fungi is now widely recognised among plant and forest pathologists; therefore, a Special Issue of Pathogens is planned that will focus on the "Biological Systematics of Tree Pathogenic Fungi.”

For this Special Issue, we invite research papers and review articles covering the systematics of tree pathogenic fungi. We look forward to publishing your contributions.

Prof. Martin Coetzee
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Pathogens is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Systematics
  • Fungi
  • Ascomycota
  • Basidiomycota.

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Article
Repeat-Induced Point Mutations Drive Divergence between Fusarium circinatum and Its Close Relatives
Pathogens 2019, 8(4), 298; https://doi.org/10.3390/pathogens8040298 - 14 Dec 2019
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1163
Abstract
The Repeat-Induced Point (RIP) mutation pathway is a fungal-specific genome defense mechanism that counteracts the deleterious effects of transposable elements. This pathway permanently mutates its target sequences by introducing cytosine to thymine transitions. We investigated the genome-wide occurrence of RIP in the pitch [...] Read more.
The Repeat-Induced Point (RIP) mutation pathway is a fungal-specific genome defense mechanism that counteracts the deleterious effects of transposable elements. This pathway permanently mutates its target sequences by introducing cytosine to thymine transitions. We investigated the genome-wide occurrence of RIP in the pitch canker pathogen, Fusarium circinatum, and its close relatives in the Fusarium fujikuroi species complex (FFSC). Our results showed that the examined fungi all exhibited hallmarks of RIP, but that they differed in terms of the extent to which their genomes were affected by this pathway. RIP mutations constituted a large proportion of all the FFSC genomes, including both core and dispensable chromosomes, although the latter were generally more extensively affected by RIP. Large RIP-affected genomic regions were also much more gene sparse than the rest of the genome. Our data further showed that RIP-directed sequence diversification increased the variability between homologous regions of related species, and that RIP-affected regions can interfere with homologous recombination during meiosis, thereby contributing to post-mating segregation distortion. Taken together, these findings suggest that RIP can drive the independent divergence of chromosomes, alter chromosome architecture, and contribute to the divergence among F. circinatum and other members of this economically important group of fungi. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biological Systematics of Tree Pathogenic Fungi)
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