Special Issue "Reoviruses and the Interferon Response"

A special issue of Pathogens (ISSN 2076-0817).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 15 September 2020.

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Guy Lemay
Website
Guest Editor
Département de microbiologie, infectiologie et immunologie, Université de Montréal, Montréal, Québec H3C 3J7, Canada
Interests: Reovirus; Interferon; Oncolytic viruses; Viral genetics

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The Orthoreovirus genus of the Reoviridae family encompasses a large group of viruses that infect not only humans but a large array of mammals, birds, and reptiles. They are also closely related to Aquareoviruses that are important fish pathogens. Although the classical mammalian reoviruses have been mostly studied in the past, there has been important progress in our understanding of all these viruses in the last decade. The development of reverse genetics for some of these viruses was certainly essential in recent progress. Furthermore, although mammalian reoviruses are generally considered as minor pathogens in humans, recent data suggest their involvement in chronic diseases such as celiac disease, while the emergence of new pathogenic strains remains possible. Finally, mammalian reoviruses are among a plethora of viruses presently under study as oncolytic agents against cancers of humans or animals. The importance of the interferon response, and the ability of a virus to control it, does not need to be proven. Not only is it involved in the pathogenicity of the infectious agent, but it can also affect its ability to infect given cell types, such as cancer cells.

In this Special Issue, we would like to invite the submission of original research or review manuscripts that cover these different aspects of the interactions between Orthoreovirus or Aquareovirus and the interferon response network. This also includes all aspects relating to pathogenesis, disease prevention, and applied virus use, such as oncolytic activity. We hope the manuscripts from this Special Issue will provide new insights into the biology of this fascinating group of viruses. I look forward to your contribution.

Prof. Dr. Guy Lemay
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Pathogens is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Reovirus
  • Aquareovirus
  • Interferon
  • Viral pathogenesis
  • Viral oncolysis
  • Viral genetics

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Review

Open AccessReview
How Many Mammalian Reovirus Proteins are involved in the Control of the Interferon Response?
Pathogens 2019, 8(2), 83; https://doi.org/10.3390/pathogens8020083 - 21 Jun 2019
Cited by 1
Abstract
As with most viruses, mammalian reovirus can be recognized and attacked by the host-cell interferon response network. Similarly, many viruses have developed resistance mechanisms to counteract the host-cell response at different points of this response. Reflecting the complexity of the interferon signaling pathways [...] Read more.
As with most viruses, mammalian reovirus can be recognized and attacked by the host-cell interferon response network. Similarly, many viruses have developed resistance mechanisms to counteract the host-cell response at different points of this response. Reflecting the complexity of the interferon signaling pathways as well as the resulting antiviral response, viruses can—and often have—evolved many determinants to interfere with this innate immune response and allow viral replication. In the last few years, it has been evidenced that mammalian reovirus encodes many different determinants that are involved in regulating the induction of the interferon response or in interfering with the action of interferon-stimulated gene products. In this brief review, we present our current understanding of the different reovirus proteins known to be involved, introduce their postulated modes of action, and raise current questions that may lead to further investigations. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Reoviruses and the Interferon Response)
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