Special Issue "Inactivate Bacterial Resistance Mechanisms"

A special issue of Pathogens (ISSN 2076-0817).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 October 2018).

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Murugan Subbiah
Website
Guest Editor
School for Global Animal Health, Washington State University,Pullman, Washington, USA
Interests: the mechanisms of antimicrobial resistance and how to preserve the effectiveness of current antibiotics; target-oriented intervention strategies to diminish or eliminate antibiotic resistance reservoirs in food-animal production systems; the contribution of food-animal-originated antibiotic resistant bacteria in the etiology of non-enteric diseases in people; innovative strategies to inactivate bacterial resistance mechanisms and thus protect the life-saving antibiotics for future generations

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Research into all aspects of antimicrobial resistance (AMR) is on the rise across the globe. The fight against challenges caused by AMR requires a better understanding of the “drivers” of AMR prevalence and mechanisms behind the transmission of resistant genes among bacterial populations in different ecosystems. Nevertheless, most of the research is merely focused on estimating the prevalence of AMR phenotypes and genotypes. Although, these studies are helpful, research works with the objectives of identifying and neutralizing those risk factors that select resistant bacterial populations and mechanisms of how AMR genes are transmitted within and between bacterial populations in different niches should be encouraged. Findings from these studies will encourage implementing novel intervention strategies to reduce the emergence and prevent the transmission of AMR. For this Special Issue of Pathogens, we invite you to submit research or review article related to intervention strategies applied to neutralize the AMR reservoirs in healthcare, food-animal production systems and community settings, and the molecular mechanisms by which AMR genes are transmitted within and between bacterial hosts. We look forward to your contribution.

Dr. Murugan Subbiah
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Pathogens is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Antimicrobial resistance
  • Antimicrobial reservoirs
  • Resistant bacteria
  • Molecular mechanism of antimicrobial resistance
  • Interventions to neutralize AMR reservoirs

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Epigallocatechin Gallate Remodelling of Hfq Amyloid-Like Region Affects Escherichia coli Survival
Pathogens 2018, 7(4), 95; https://doi.org/10.3390/pathogens7040095 - 01 Dec 2018
Cited by 1
Abstract
Hfq is a pleiotropic regulator that has key roles in the control of genetic expression. The protein noticeably regulates translation efficiency and RNA decay in Gram-negative bacteria, due to the Hfq-mediated interaction between small regulatory noncoding RNA and mRNA. This property is of [...] Read more.
Hfq is a pleiotropic regulator that has key roles in the control of genetic expression. The protein noticeably regulates translation efficiency and RNA decay in Gram-negative bacteria, due to the Hfq-mediated interaction between small regulatory noncoding RNA and mRNA. This property is of primary importance for bacterial adaptation and virulence. We have previously shown that the Hfq E. coli protein, and more precisely its C-terminal region (CTR), self-assembles into an amyloid-like structure. In the present work, we demonstrate that epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG), a major green tea polyphenol compound, targets the Hfq amyloid region and can be used as a potential antibacterial agent. We analysed the effect of this compound on Hfq amyloid fibril stability and show that EGCG both disrupts Hfq-CTR fibrils and inhibits their formation. We show that, even if EGCG affects other bacterial amyloids, it also specifically targets Hfq-CTR in vivo. Our results provide an alternative approach for the utilisation of EGCG that may be used synergistically with conventional antibiotics to block bacterial adaptation and treat infections. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Inactivate Bacterial Resistance Mechanisms)
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