Special Issue "Role of Heat Shock Proteins in Immunosenescence and Disease Conditions"

A special issue of Pathogens (ISSN 2076-0817). This special issue belongs to the section "Immunological Responses and Immune Defense Mechanisms".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 20 October 2022 | Viewed by 1623

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Njemini Rose
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Gerontology (GERO) & Frailty in Ageing research (FRIA) departments, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Laarbeeklaan 103, B-1090 Brussels, Belgium
Interests: Heat shock proteins; Immunosenescence; T-cell senescence, Inflammation, Onchocerciasis, Biogerontology

Special Issue Information

Heat shock proteins (HSP) are highly essential for cell survival. They are synthesized in response to a plethora of stress signals including physical stress, oxidative stress, immune activation, and various disease states. Intracellular functions of HSP include both specific biological actions that are linked to a particular HSP and more general chaperone activities that result in the resumption of normal cellular metabolism. HSP have been implicated in diverse pathophysiological conditions like cardiovascular diseases, cancer, aging, diabetes, obesity, malaria, Chagas’ disease, schistosomiasis, and many bacterial and viral infections. Scientific evidence indicates that if HSP expression falls below a certain level, cells become sensitive to oxidative damage that accelerates aging and protein aggregation diseases. Meanwhile, persistently enhanced levels of HSP can lead to inflammatory and oncogenic changes. Although changes in HSP expression are associated with certain diseases, the question as to whether this is an adaptation to a particular pathophysiologic state, or a reflection of the suboptimal cellular environment associated with the disease remains open.

On the other hand, there are indications that HSP – due to their cytoprotective nature – may enhance the survival and persistence of senescent immune cells that underlie immunosenescence and its related negative health outcomes. Indeed, some excellent studies in murine models, in which senescent cells were targeted in different ways, found that clearance of senescent cells in skeletal muscle, eye, and fat, significantly attenuated the onset of age-related pathologies – as well as the progression of already established age-related diseases – in these tissues. Moreover, impairment of the immune system due to an increasing number of senescent T-cells with age has been reported to potentially promote progression of malignant tumors in older persons. Despite the current body of evidence, the role of HSP in immunosenescence and, more specifically, in T-cell senescence has not been completely investigated.

Therefore, a Special Issue of Pathogens is planned that will focus on the "role of HSP in immunosenescence and related diseases”. For this Special Issue, we invite you to contribute original research articles, review articles, short notes, as well as communications that could contribute to a better understanding of the role of the HSP in immunosenescence and its related diseases. Potential topics will also include innovative methods that might facilitate the investigation of HSP. We look forward to publishing your contribution.

Prof. Dr. Njemini Rose
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Pathogens is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2200 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Heat shock proteins
  • Immunosenescence
  • T-cell senescence
  • Diseases

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Article
A Novel Bead-Based Immunoassay for the Measurement of Heat Shock Proteins 27 and 70
Pathogens 2020, 9(11), 863; https://doi.org/10.3390/pathogens9110863 - 22 Oct 2020
Viewed by 1213
Abstract
Heat shock proteins (HSPs) play an essential role in protecting proteins from denaturation and are implicated in diverse pathophysiological conditions like cardiovascular diseases, cancer, infections, and neurodegenerative diseases. Scientific evidence indicates that if HSP expression falls below a certain level, cells become sensitive [...] Read more.
Heat shock proteins (HSPs) play an essential role in protecting proteins from denaturation and are implicated in diverse pathophysiological conditions like cardiovascular diseases, cancer, infections, and neurodegenerative diseases. Scientific evidence indicates that if HSP expression falls below a certain level, cells become sensitive to oxidative damage that accelerates protein aggregation diseases. On the other hand, persistently enhanced levels of HSP can lead to inflammatory and oncogenic changes. To date, although techniques for measuring HSPs exist, these assays are limited for use in specific sample types or are time consuming. Therefore, in the present study, we developed a single-molecule assay digital ELISA technology (Single Molecule Array—SIMOA) for the measurement of HSPs, which is time effective and can be adapted to measure multiple analytes simultaneously from a single sample. This technique combines two distinct HSP-specific antibodies that recognize different epitopes on the HSP molecule. A recombinant human HSP protein was used as the standard material. The assay performance characteristics were evaluated by repeated testing of samples spiked with HSP peptide at different levels. The limit of detection was 0.16 and 2 ng/mL for HSP27 and HSP70, respectively. The inter- and intra-assay coefficients of variation were less than 20% in all tested conditions for both HSPs. The HSP levels assayed after serial dilution of samples portrayed dilutional linearity (on average 109%, R2 = 0.998, p < 0.001, for HSP27 and 93%, R2 = 0.994, p < 0.001, for HSP70). A high linear response was also demonstrated with admixtures of plasma exhibiting relatively very low and high levels of HSP70 (R2 = 0.982, p < 0.001). Analyte spike recovery varied between 57% and 95%. Moreover, the relative HSP values obtained using Western blotting correlated significantly with HSP values obtained with the newly developed SIMOA assay (r = 0.815, p < 0.001 and r = 0.895, p < 0.001 for HSP70 and HSP27, respectively), indicating that our method is reliable. In conclusion, the assay demonstrates analytical performance for the accurate assessment of HSPs in various sample types and offers the advantage of a huge range of dilution linearity, indicating that samples with HSP concentration highly above the calibration range can be diluted into range without affecting the precision of the assay. Full article
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