Special Issue "Molecular Self-Assembly in Nanotechnology"

A special issue of Nanomaterials (ISSN 2079-4991). This special issue belongs to the section "Synthesis, Interfaces and Nanostructures".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 15 March 2021.

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Fabien Silly
Website
Guest Editor
CEA Saclay, 91191 Gif sur Yvette, France
Interests: two-dimensional nanoarchitecture; nanomaterials; surface; interface; self-assembly; scanning tunneling microscopy

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Molecular-self-assembly is a powerful method for engineering carbon-based nanoarchitectures at a molecular scale. This technique has received tremendous attention because of the multiple directions it offers to govern the arrangement of the molecules. Self-assembled organic nanostructures can be tailored at the atomic scale by exploiting numerous directional intermolecular interactions, such as hydrogen and halogen bonds. Specific hybrid organic architectures can also be engineered, taking advantage of metal-coordinated and organic–ionic compound interactions. In addition, several intermolecular reactions have also been identified to generate carbon nanoarchitectures via surface-assisted intermolecular covalent C−C coupling. The molecular shape, size, structure, nature, and position of the substituent groups, as well as the temperature, are thus the key parameters governing the self-assembly of nanoarchitectures. These multiple parameters offer nearly endless possibilities to engineer original and novel nanoarchitectures tailored at an atomic scale. The aim of this research is to create new nanomaterials with original internal structures and enhanced electronic properties for applications in nanotechnology, as nanoelectronics, gas sensing, photovoltaic, spintronics, and so on.

This Special Issue of Nanomaterials attempts to cover the most recent advances in molecular-self-assembly, concerning not only concepts for synthesizing and engineering novel organic nanoarchitetctures, but also reports on the specific electronic properties of these systems and their applications in nanotechnology. The investigations focus on elucidating the interactions driving the molecular assembly, and also on assessing the local properties of the organic building blocks and those of the nanoachitectures.

Dr. Fabien Silly
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Nanomaterials is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2200 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • molecule
  • self-assembly
  • interaction
  • nanoarchitectures
  • directional
  • intramolecular feature
  • covalent
  • metal-coordinated
  • hydrogen bond
  • halogen bond
  • ionic-organic interaction

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Review

Open AccessReview
Pillararenes Trimer for Self-Assembly
Nanomaterials 2020, 10(4), 651; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano10040651 - 31 Mar 2020
Cited by 3
Abstract
Pillararenes trimer with particularly designed structural geometry and excellent capacity of recognizing guest molecules is a very efficient and attractive building block for the fabrication of advanced self-assembled materials. Pillararenes trimers could be prepared via both covalent and noncovalent bonds. The classic organic [...] Read more.
Pillararenes trimer with particularly designed structural geometry and excellent capacity of recognizing guest molecules is a very efficient and attractive building block for the fabrication of advanced self-assembled materials. Pillararenes trimers could be prepared via both covalent and noncovalent bonds. The classic organic synthesis reactions such as click reaction, palladium-catalyzed coupling reaction, amidation, esterification, and aminolysis are employed to build covalent bonds and integrate three pieces of pillararenes subunits together into the “star-shaped” trimers and linear foldamers. Alternatively, pillararenes trimers could also be assembled in the form of host-guest inclusions and mechanically interlocked molecules via noncovalent interactions, and during those procedures, pillararenes units contribute the cavity for recognizing guest molecules and act as a “wheel” subunit, respectively. By fully utilizing the driving forces such as host-guest interactions, charge transfer, hydrophobic, hydrogen bonding, and C–Hπ and π–π stacking interactions, pillararenes trimers-based supramolecular self-assemblies provide a possibility in the construction of multi-dimensional materials such as vesicular and tubular aggregates, layered networks, as well as frameworks. Interestingly, those assembled materials exhibit interesting external stimuli responsiveness to e.g., variable concentrations, changed pH values, different temperature, as well as the addition/removal of competition guests and ions. Thus, they could further be used for diverse applications such as detection, sorption, and separation of significant multi-analytes including metal cations, anions, and amino acids. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Molecular Self-Assembly in Nanotechnology)
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