molecules-logo

Journal Browser

Journal Browser

Special Issue "Polysaccharides: Structure-Function Relationships"

A special issue of Molecules (ISSN 1420-3049). This special issue belongs to the section "Bioorganic Chemistry".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 15 November 2020.

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Gordon Morris
Website
Guest Editor
Department of Chemical Sciences, University of Huddersfield, Huddersfield, United Kingdom
Interests: hydrocolloids; chitosan; pectins; molecular weight; glycosaminoglycans

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Polysaccharides are carbohydrate polymers composed of long chains of monosaccharide units linked via glycosidic bonds. In recent years, polysaccharides have been widely used as, for example, food ingredients, drug delivery vehicles, or in wound healing applications. Polysaccharides have also demonstrated a wide range of bioactivities, and are found in a number of ethnopharmacological formulations. In each of these applications, polysaccharide functionality depends on their chemical structure, physical properties, and conformation, which are themselves dependent on several factors, such as genetic variations, growing conditions, and extraction conditions. This Special Edition of Molecules is aimed at covering the recent advances in the physico-chemical characterization and functional properties of polysaccharides. Articles that attempt to understand the relationship between polysaccharide structure and functionality are particularly encouraged. Review articles are also welcome.

Prof. Gordon A. Morris
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Molecules is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Polysaccharides
  • Structure–function
  • Molecular weight
  • Ethnopharmacology
  • Rheology
  • Controlled release
  • Solution conformation
  • Emulsions
  • Mucoadhesion
  • Drug delivery

Published Papers (3 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Jump to: Review

Open AccessArticle
Influence of Partial Acid Hydrolysis on Size, Dispersity, Monosaccharide Composition, and Conformation of Linearly-Branched Water-Soluble Polysaccharides
Molecules 2020, 25(13), 2982; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules25132982 - 29 Jun 2020
Abstract
The effect of partial acid hydrolysis on the physical and chemical properties of galactomannan, arabinoxylan, and xyloglucan was investigated. Polysaccharides were treated at 50 °C with hydrochloric acid for 3–48 h. Portions of isopropanol (i-PrOH) were added sequentially to the hydrolyzates, [...] Read more.
The effect of partial acid hydrolysis on the physical and chemical properties of galactomannan, arabinoxylan, and xyloglucan was investigated. Polysaccharides were treated at 50 °C with hydrochloric acid for 3–48 h. Portions of isopropanol (i-PrOH) were added sequentially to the hydrolyzates, resulting in fractions that were collected by centrifugation. As expected, a significant reduction of weight-average molecular weight (Mw) was observed with increasing hydrolysis time. Fractional precipitation was successfully applied to collect at least one polymer fraction with dispersity (Đ) close to one for each polysaccharide. The monosaccharide composition analysis showed that the partial hydrolysis usually lowered the relative amount of side chains, with the exception of galactomannan, where the composition remained largely unaffected. Estimation of the polymer conformation in solution, through evaluation of the Mark-Houwink parameter coefficient (α), confirmed that acid hydrolysis influenced the polysaccharides’ conformation. It was demonstrated that acid treatment in dilute solution followed by fractional isopropanol precipitation is a method, extendible to a variety of polysaccharides, to obtain materials of decreased molecular weight and low dispersity with slightly altered overall composition and conformation. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Polysaccharides: Structure-Function Relationships)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
Immunomodulatory Effects of Lycium barbarum Polysaccharide Extract and Its Uptake Behaviors at the Cellular Level
Molecules 2020, 25(6), 1351; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules25061351 - 16 Mar 2020
Abstract
Lycium barbarum L. is a widely used functional food and medicinal herb in Asian countries. L. barbarium polysaccharides (LBP) are considered as one of the major medicinal components of L. barbarium fruit and exhibits a wide range of biological activities. Here, we investigated [...] Read more.
Lycium barbarum L. is a widely used functional food and medicinal herb in Asian countries. L. barbarium polysaccharides (LBP) are considered as one of the major medicinal components of L. barbarium fruit and exhibits a wide range of biological activities. Here, we investigated the immunomodulatory effects of LBP and its uptake behaviors at the cellular level. LBP was prepared by water extraction and ethanol precipitation, and divided into two fractions based on the molecular weight distribution by ultrafiltration (LBP > 10 kDa and LBP < 10 kDa). The physicochemical properties of LBP and LBP fractions were well characterized. The LBP > 10 kDa fraction greatly enhanced the viability of macrophages RAW264.7 cells and induced cell polarization, but had weak effects to other tested tumor cell lines and normal cell line. This fraction could regulate the production of NO, TNF-α, IL-6 and ROS in RAW264.7 cells, suggesting both pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory effects. The dye-labeled LBP could be internalized into all tested cell lines and accumulated in lysosomes. The internalization of LBP in RAW264.7 cells is mainly through the clathrin-mediated endocytosis pathway. The Caco-2 intestinal transport experiment demonstrated that the dye labeled LBP could be transported through the Caco-2 cell monolayer (mimic intestinal epithelium) through clathrin-mediated endocytosis. These results demonstrate the immunomodulatory effects of LBP and its effective uptake by macrophages and intestine. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Polysaccharides: Structure-Function Relationships)
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

Review

Jump to: Research

Open AccessReview
Multivalent Ions as Reactive Crosslinkers for Biopolymers—A Review
Molecules 2020, 25(8), 1840; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules25081840 - 16 Apr 2020
Abstract
Many biopolymers exhibit a strong complexing ability for multivalent ions. Often such ions form ionic bridges between the polymer chains. This leads to the formation of ionic cross linked networks and supermolecular structures, thus promoting the modification of the behavior of solid and [...] Read more.
Many biopolymers exhibit a strong complexing ability for multivalent ions. Often such ions form ionic bridges between the polymer chains. This leads to the formation of ionic cross linked networks and supermolecular structures, thus promoting the modification of the behavior of solid and gel polymer networks. Sorption of biopolymers on fiber surfaces and interfaces increases substantially in the case of multivalent ions, e.g., calcium being available for ionic crosslinking. Through controlled adsorption and ionic crosslinking surface modification of textile fibers with biopolymers can be achieved, thus altering the characteristics at the interface between fiber and surrounding matrices. A brief introduction on the differences deriving from the biopolymers, as their interaction with other compounds, is given. Functional models are presented and specified by several examples from previous and recent studies. The relevance of ionic crosslinks in biopolymers is discussed by means of selected examples of wider use. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Polysaccharides: Structure-Function Relationships)
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

Back to TopTop