Special Issue "Novel Methods and Applications for Mineral Exploration"

A special issue of Minerals (ISSN 2075-163X).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 24 January 2020.

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Paul Alexandre
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Geology, Brandon University, John R. Brodie Science Centre, 270–18th Street, Brandon, Manitoba, R7A 6A9, Canada
Interests: geochemical exploration; metallogeny; geostatistics; mineralogy; geochronology
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

As the mineral exploration industry faces new challenges (deeper deposits with lower grades in more remote regions), exploration geoscientists strive to develop novel exploration methods, techniques, and applications. These efforts affect the main fields of geophysics (e.g., ZTEM) and geochemistry (e.g., isotopes), but we also see the emergence of novel exploration methods or revival and redevelopment of established methods.

Submissions are invited for a Special Issue of Minerals reflecting on these recent developments. Of particular interest are manuscripts describing a novel exploration method or technique, or the novel application or a standards method, or case studies and success stories. A broad range of deposit types, commodities, and geographic regions will be considered. The intent is to achieve a comprehensive and timely anthology of the most advanced and recent developments in mineral exploration.

Dr. Paul Alexandre
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Minerals is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • mineral exploration
  • economic geology
  • exploration methodology
  • geochemical exploration
  • geophysical exploration
  • novel exploration techniques
  • modern exploration techniques

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle
Joint Inversion of 2D Gravity Gradiometry and Magnetotelluric Data in Mineral Exploration
Minerals 2019, 9(9), 541; https://doi.org/10.3390/min9090541 - 07 Sep 2019
Abstract
We have developed a mineral exploration method for the joint inversion of 2D gravity gradiometry and magnetotelluric (MT) data based on data-space and normalized cross-gradient constraints. To accurately explore the underground structure of complex mineral deposits and solve the problems such as the [...] Read more.
We have developed a mineral exploration method for the joint inversion of 2D gravity gradiometry and magnetotelluric (MT) data based on data-space and normalized cross-gradient constraints. To accurately explore the underground structure of complex mineral deposits and solve the problems such as the non-uniqueness and inconsistency of the single parameter inversion model, it is now common practice to perform collocated MT and gravity surveys that complement each other in the search. Although conventional joint inversion of MT and gravity using model-space can be diagnostic, we posit that better results can be derived from the joint inversion of the MT and gravity gradiometry data using data-space. Gravity gradiometry data contains more abundant component information than traditional gravity data and can be used to classify the spatial structure and location of underground structures and field sources more accurately and finely, and the data-space method consumes less memory and has a shorter computation time for our particular inversion iteration algorithm. We verify our proposed method with synthetic models. The experimental results prove that our proposed method leads to models with remarkable structural resemblance and improved estimates of electrical resistivity and density and requires shorter computation time and less memory. We also apply the method to field data to test its potential use for subsurface lithofacies discrimination or structural classification. Our results suggest that the imaging method leads to improved characterization of geological targets, which is more conducive to geological interpretation and the exploration of mineral resources. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Novel Methods and Applications for Mineral Exploration)
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Open AccessArticle
Joint MT and Gravity Inversion Using Structural Constraints: A Case Study from the Linjiang Copper Mining Area, Jilin, China
Minerals 2019, 9(7), 407; https://doi.org/10.3390/min9070407 - 02 Jul 2019
Cited by 1
Abstract
We present a joint 2D inversion approach for magnetotelluric (MT) and gravity data with elastic-net regularization and cross-gradient constraints. We describe the main features of the approach and verify the inversion results against a synthetic model. The results indicate that the best fit [...] Read more.
We present a joint 2D inversion approach for magnetotelluric (MT) and gravity data with elastic-net regularization and cross-gradient constraints. We describe the main features of the approach and verify the inversion results against a synthetic model. The results indicate that the best fit solution using the L2 is overly smooth, while the best fit solution for the L1 norm is too sparse. However, the elastic-net regularization method, a convex combination term of L2 norm and L1 norm, can not only enforce the stability to preserve local smoothness, but can also enforce the sparsity to preserve sharp boundaries. Cross-gradient constraints lead to models with close structural resemblance and improve the estimates of the resistivity and density of the synthetic dataset. We apply the novel approach to field datasets from a copper mining area in the northeast of China. Our results show that the method can generate much more detail and a sharper boundary as well as better depth resolution. Relative to the existing solution, the large area divergence phenomenon under the anomalous bodies is eliminated, and the fine anomalous bodies boundary appeared in the smooth region. This method can provide important technical support for detecting deep concealed deposits. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Novel Methods and Applications for Mineral Exploration)
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Open AccessArticle
A Bat-Optimized One-Class Support Vector Machine for Mineral Prospectivity Mapping
Minerals 2019, 9(5), 317; https://doi.org/10.3390/min9050317 - 23 May 2019
Abstract
One-class support vector machine (OCSVM) is an efficient data-driven mineral prospectivity mapping model. Since the parameters of OCSVM directly affect the performance of the model, it is necessary to optimize the parameters of OCSVM in mineral prospectivity mapping. Trial and error method is [...] Read more.
One-class support vector machine (OCSVM) is an efficient data-driven mineral prospectivity mapping model. Since the parameters of OCSVM directly affect the performance of the model, it is necessary to optimize the parameters of OCSVM in mineral prospectivity mapping. Trial and error method is usually used to determine the “optimal” parameters of OCSVM. However, it is difficult to find the globally optimal parameters by the trial and error method. By combining OCSVM with the bat algorithm, the intialization parameters of the OCSVM can be automatically optimized. The combined model is called bat-optimized OCSVM. In this model, the area under the curve (AUC) of OCSVM is taken as the fitness value of the objective function optimized by the bat algorithm, the value ranges of the initialization parameters of OCSVM are used to specify the search space of bat population, and the optimal parameters of OCSVM are automatically determined through the iterative search process of the bat algorithm. The bat-optimized OCSVMs were used to map mineral prospectivity of the Helong district, Jilin Province, China, and compared with the OCSVM initialized by the default parameters (i.e., common OCSVM) and the OCSVM optimized by trial and error. The results show that (a) the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve of the trial and error-optimized OCSVM is intersected with those of the bat-optimized OCSVMs and (b) the ROC curves of the optimized OCSVMs slightly dominate that of the common OCSVM in the ROC space. The area under the curves (AUCs) of the common and trial and error-optimized OCSVMs (0.8268 and 0.8566) are smaller than those of the bat-optimized ones (0.8649 and 0.8644). The optimal threshold for extracting mineral targets was determined by using the Youden index. The mineral targets predicted by the common and trial and error-optimized OCSVMs account for 29.61% and 18.66% of the study area respectively, and contain 93% and 86% of the known mineral deposits. The mineral targets predicted by the bat-optimized OCSVMs account for 19.84% and 14.22% of the study area respectively, and also contain 93% and 86% of the known mineral deposits. Therefore, we have 0.93/0.2961 = 3.1408 < 0.86/0.1866 = 4.6088 < 0.93/0.1984 = 4.6875 < 0.86/0.1422 = 6.0478, indicating that the bat-optimized OCSVMs perform slightly better than the common and trial and error-optimized OCSVMs in mineral prospectivity mapping. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Novel Methods and Applications for Mineral Exploration)
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Review

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Open AccessReview
Tools and Workflows for Grassroots Li–Cs–Ta (LCT) Pegmatite Exploration
Minerals 2019, 9(8), 499; https://doi.org/10.3390/min9080499 - 20 Aug 2019
Abstract
The increasing demand for green technology and battery metals necessitates a review of geological exploration techniques for Li–Cs–Ta (LCT) pegmatites, which is applicable to the work of mining companies. This paper reviews the main controls of LCT pegmatite genesis relevant to mineral exploration [...] Read more.
The increasing demand for green technology and battery metals necessitates a review of geological exploration techniques for Li–Cs–Ta (LCT) pegmatites, which is applicable to the work of mining companies. This paper reviews the main controls of LCT pegmatite genesis relevant to mineral exploration programs and presents a workflow of grassroots exploration techniques, supported by examples from central Europe and Africa. Geological exploration commonly begins with information gathering, desktop studies and Geographic Information System (GIS) data reviews. Following the identification of prospective regional areas, initial targets are verified in the field by geological mapping and geochemical sampling. Detailed mineralogical analysis and geochemical sampling of rock, soil and stream sediments represent the most important tools for providing vectors to LCT pegmatites, since the interpretation of mineralogical phases, deportment and liberation characteristics along with geochemical K/Rb, Nb/Ta and Zr/Hf metallogenic markers can detect highly evolved rocks enriched in incompatible elements of economic interest. The importance of JORC (Joint Ore Reserves Committee) 2012 guidelines with regards to obtaining geological, mineralogical and drilling data is discussed and contextualised, with the requirement of treating LCT pegmatites as industrial mineral deposits. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Novel Methods and Applications for Mineral Exploration)
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Planned Papers

The below list represents only planned manuscripts. Some of these manuscripts have not been received by the Editorial Office yet. Papers submitted to MDPI journals are subject to peer-review.


 

 

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