Special Issue "Freshwater Wetland Soil Microbiology"

A special issue of Microorganisms (ISSN 2076-2607). This special issue belongs to the section "Environmental Microbiology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 July 2019

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Bruce H. Bleakley

Biology/Microbiology Dept. and Agronomy, Horticulture & Plant Science Dept., South Dakota State University, Brookings, SD 57007, USA
Website | E-Mail
Interests: nitrogen cycle microorganisms; wetland microbiology; biological control of crop pests; fecal coliforms in the environment; terrestrial microbiomes
Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Rebecca Lee Phillips

Ecological Insights Corporation, 130 69th Street SE; Hazelton, ND 58544, USA
Website | E-Mail
Interests: carbon and nitrogen biogeochemistry; prairie pothole wetlands; terrestrial microbiomes; ecosystem ecology

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

As research in disciplines including soil and water quality, and sustainability of soil and other resources, continues to advance, the contribution of freshwater wetland soils and their microorganisms to these disciplines should not be overlooked. Microorganisms of freshwater wetland soils impact ecosystem services; water quality; biogeochemical cycling of C, N, and P; and greenhouse gas emissions in many terrestrial environments. There is a need for more information about freshwater wetland soil microorganisms, their attendant biogeochemical and other activities, and their relationships to the plants and animals they associate with, to help us better understand wetland soil biology/microbiology, to conserve wetland resources, and to better plan and implement agricultural and other practices on the terrestrial landscape. 

For this Special Issue of Microorganisms, we invite you to send contributions concerning any aspect of freshwater wetland soil microbiology and attendant biogeochemistry.

Prof. Dr. Bruce H. Bleakley
Prof. Dr. Rebecca Lee Phillips
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Microorganisms is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • freshwater wetland soil
  • freshwater wetland soil microorganism
  • freshwater wetland soil biogeochemistry
  • freshwater wetland soil nitrogen
  • freshwater wetland soil sulfur
  • freshwater wetland soil carbon
  • freshwater wetland soil methane
  • freshwater wetland greenhouse gas

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Open AccessArticle Urbanization Altered Bacterial and Archaeal Composition in Tidal Freshwater Wetlands Near Washington DC, USA, and Buenos Aires, Argentina
Microorganisms 2019, 7(3), 72; https://doi.org/10.3390/microorganisms7030072
Received: 12 December 2018 / Revised: 14 February 2019 / Accepted: 2 March 2019 / Published: 6 March 2019
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Abstract
Urban expansion causes coastal wetland loss, and environmental stressors associated with development can lead to wetland degradation and loss of ecosystem services. This study investigated the effect of urbanization on prokaryotic community composition in tidal freshwater wetlands. Sites in an urban, suburban, and [...] Read more.
Urban expansion causes coastal wetland loss, and environmental stressors associated with development can lead to wetland degradation and loss of ecosystem services. This study investigated the effect of urbanization on prokaryotic community composition in tidal freshwater wetlands. Sites in an urban, suburban, and rural setting were located near Buenos Aires, Argentina, and Washington D.C., USA. We sampled soil associated with two pairs of functionally similar plant species, and used Illumina sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene to examine changes in prokaryotic communities. Urban stressors included raw sewage inputs, nutrient pollution, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. Prokaryotic communities changed along the gradient (nested PerMANOVA, Buenos Aires: p = 0.005; Washington D.C.: p = 0.001), but did not differ between plant species within sites. Indicator taxa included Methanobacteria in rural sites, and nitrifying bacteria in urban sites, and we observed a decrease in methanogens and an increase in ammonia-oxidizers from rural to urban sites. Functional profiles in the Buenos Aires communities showed higher abundance of pathways related to nitrification and xenobiotic degradation in the urban site. These results suggest that changes in prokaryotic taxa across the gradient were due to surrounding stressors, and communities in urban and rural wetlands are likely carrying out different functions. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Freshwater Wetland Soil Microbiology)
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