Multi-Omics Approaches in Microbial Research

A special issue of Microorganisms (ISSN 2076-2607). This special issue belongs to the section "Microbial Biotechnology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 June 2023) | Viewed by 2542

Special Issue Editor

1. Nutrition and Health Unit, Eurecat Technology Center of Catalonia, 43204 Reus, Catalonia, Spain
2. Department of Biochemistry and Biotechnology, University Rovira i Virgili, 43007 Tarragona, Catalonia, Spain
3. Department of Biology, University of Turku, 20500 Turku, Finland
Interests: computational biology; microbial evolution; evolutionary genomics; phylogenomics diversity; genome dynamics; prokaryotes; viruses
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Multi-omics approaches utilize a combined set of omics analyses (including genomics, transcriptomics, proteomics, and metabolomics) for the same experiment or group of samples. Advances in high-throughput sequencing of microbiomes, together with the development of novel bioinformatics tools to efficiently associate the results of several omics data, have become increasingly significant in microbial research. Moreover, the growing adoption of metagenomics approaches, over 16S rRNA-like biomarkers, allows functional characterizations at the community level. An important challenge in microbial research is how to translate multi-omics measurements into biological insights.

This Special Issue welcomes seminal articles on Multi-omics Approaches in Microbial Research for the identification of health, ecological, and biotechnological associations. Multi-omics approaches considering both community and single-cell metagenomics are welcome. This SI is open to original research articles and reviews covering multi-omics approaches on all sorts of microorganisms (including free-living, host-associated, parasites, domesticated, and probiotics) and microbial communities (including human, animal, plants and environmental microbiomes). Strong methodological articles are also welcome but must be accompanied by a compelling example or case study to demonstrate their applicability in microbial research.

Dr. Pere Puigbò
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • multi-omics research
  • omics data integration
  • association studies
  • ecological associations
  • health associations
  • microbiome
  • microbial communities
  • genomics
  • transcriptomics
  • metagenomics
  • proteomics
  • metabolomics
  • host-associated microbes
  • plant-associated microbes
  • free-living microbes
  • domesticated microbes
  • gut microbiome
  • dysbiosis
  • antimicrobials
  • antibiotic resistance
  • plant microbiome
  • human microbiome
  • animal microbiome
  • parasites
  • bacteria
  • archaea
  • fungi
  • viruses
  • probiotics

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

19 pages, 2649 KiB  
Article
Marine-Derived Streptomyces sennicomposti GMY01 with Anti-Plasmodial and Anticancer Activities: Genome Analysis, In Vitro Bioassay, Metabolite Profiling, and Molecular Docking
Microorganisms 2023, 11(8), 1930; https://doi.org/10.3390/microorganisms11081930 - 28 Jul 2023
Viewed by 1109
Abstract
To discover novel antimalarial and anticancer compounds, we carried out a genome analysis, bioassay, metabolite profiling, and molecular docking of marine sediment actinobacteria strain GMY01. The whole-genome sequence analysis revealed that Streptomyces sp. GMY01 (7.9 Mbp) is most similar to Streptomyces sennicomposti strain [...] Read more.
To discover novel antimalarial and anticancer compounds, we carried out a genome analysis, bioassay, metabolite profiling, and molecular docking of marine sediment actinobacteria strain GMY01. The whole-genome sequence analysis revealed that Streptomyces sp. GMY01 (7.9 Mbp) is most similar to Streptomyces sennicomposti strain RCPT1-4T with an average nucleotide identity (ANI) and ANI based on BLAST+ (ANIb) values of 98.09 and 97.33% (>95%). An in vitro bioassay of the GMY01 bioactive on Plasmodium falciparum FCR3, cervical carcinoma of HeLa cell and lung carcinoma of HTB cells exhibited moderate activity (IC50 value of 46.06; 27.31 and 33.75 µg/mL) with low toxicity on Vero cells as a normal cell (IC50 value of 823.3 µg/mL). Metabolite profiling by LC-MS/MS analysis revealed that the active fraction of GMY01 contained carbohydrate-based compounds, C17H29NO14 (471.15880 Da) as a major compound (97.50%) and mannotriose (C18H32O16; 504.16903 Da, 1.96%) as a minor compound. Molecular docking analysis showed that mannotriose has a binding affinity on glutathione reductase (GR) and glutathione-S-transferase (GST) of P. falciparum and on autophagy proteins (mTORC1 and mTORC2) of cancer cells. Streptomyces sennicomposti GMY01 is a potential bacterium producing carbohydrate-based bioactive compounds with anti-plasmodial and anticancer activities and with low toxicity to normal cells. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Multi-Omics Approaches in Microbial Research)
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