Hepatology

A section of Medicina (ISSN 1010-660X).

Section Information

“Hepatology ” is an old specialty that involves caring for patients suffering from acute and chronic liver diseases, among the main causes of mortality, including viral, autoimmune, metabolic, and genetic illnesses. Due to the skyrocketing availability of new diagnostic tools and therapeutical approaches, these illnesses require increased attention. Therefore, physicians dealing with hepato-patients require a broad field of knowledge of diagnostic procedures including liver biopsy, ultrasound, TAC, RMN, elastography, EGDS as well as an understanding of surgical methods for shunting and/or liver transplantation, of invasive approaches for hepatocarcinoma, and finally of antiviral therapy. Last but not least, hepatologists should have a multidisciplinary and interprofessional environment to support top-quality care.

The section “Hepatology” of the journal Medicina is devoted to the propagation of novel findings and state-of-the-art knowledge in the field of liver disease of every etiology.

The main aim is advancing the growth of diagnosis and therapy of the non-alcoholic liver disease (NAFLD), which, due to the obesity pandemic, has surged to unprecedented levels and is one of the most frequent motivations for liver transplantation and causes of hepatocarcinoma, deepening its spectrum, i.e., simple fatty liver, nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), and cirrhosis post-NASH.

Topics of interest for this section include, but are not limited, to the following:

  • Basic and clinical research in NAFLD diagnosis and therapy;
  • Therapy and follow-up of patients suffering from viral infections (HBV, HBV, HDV);
  • Early diagnosis of hepatocarcinoma; strategies to cure hepatocarcinoma
  • Liver cirrhosis with its complications (portal hypertension, ascites, hemorrhage, hepato-renal syndrome, hepatic encephalopathy).

Keywords

NAFLD; hepatocarcinoma; HBV; HCV; HDV; liver transplantation; hemochromatosis; primitive biliary cirrhosis; Wilson’s disease; alpha1 antitrypsin deficit

Editorial Board

Papers Published

Back to TopTop