Project Collection "Personalised Medicine–Bringing Innovation to the Healthcare System"

A project collection of Journal of Personalized Medicine (ISSN 2075-4426).

Papers displayed on this page all arise from the same project. Editorial decisions were made independently of project staff and handled by the Editor-in-Chief or qualified Editorial Board members.

Editors

Guest Editor
Dr. Denis Horgan

European Alliance for Personalised Medicine, Brussels, Belgium
Website | E-Mail
Interests: personalised medicine; incentives in healthcare; health literacy; decision making frameworks
Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Gordon McVie

Institute of Molecular Oncology (IFOM) Milan, Cancer Studies, Kings College London, UK
Website | E-Mail
Interests: cancer; communication; oncology

Project Overview

Dear Colleagues

A major pillar in bringing new, targeted medicines to patients is, of course, innovation. This, in the realm of health, means the translation of knowledge and insight into what we can call ‘value’. In addition, that value covers the value to patients, but also has to take into account value to healthcare systems, society and, of course, the manufacturers.

Of course, a personalised medicine approach is not always required. However, when it is, we should be working towards segmenting the use of even existing medicines (many of which do their job perfectly well) into responders and non-responders, which will in turn assist in the development of novel medicines.

On top of this, the technology now exists to apply the personalised medicine, genetic-based techniques in prevention, possibly via individual risk maps which may suggest specific guidance on living a healthy life.

All of this is built upon thorough research, of course. Which then needs to be translated via various process on the way to market, not least of which are regulatory approval and pricing.

This Project Collection deals with these areas.

Yours Sincerely,

Dr. Denis Horgan
Prof. Dr. Gordon McVie
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the collection website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Journal of Personalized Medicine is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 550 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Innovation
  • Healthcare professionals
  • Reimbursement
  • Access
  • Translational Research
  • Education of Healthcare Professionals
  • European Medicine Agency
  • European Union
  • healthcare system
  • Regulatory authorities

Published Papers (2 papers)

2017

Open AccessReview
Value-Based Pricing and Reimbursement in Personalised Healthcare: Introduction to the Basic Health Economics
J. Pers. Med. 2017, 7(3), 10; https://doi.org/10.3390/jpm7030010
Received: 20 July 2017 / Revised: 24 August 2017 / Accepted: 28 August 2017 / Published: 4 September 2017
Cited by 6 | PDF Full-text (524 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
‘Value-based’ outcomes, pricing, and reimbursement are widely discussed as health sector reforms these days. In this paper, we discuss their meaning and relationship in the context of personalized healthcare, defined as receipt of care conditional on the results of a biomarker-based diagnostic test. [...] Read more.
‘Value-based’ outcomes, pricing, and reimbursement are widely discussed as health sector reforms these days. In this paper, we discuss their meaning and relationship in the context of personalized healthcare, defined as receipt of care conditional on the results of a biomarker-based diagnostic test. We address the question: “What kinds of pricing and reimbursement models should be applied in personalized healthcare?” The simple answer is that competing innovators and technology adopters should have incentives that promote long-term dynamic efficiency. We argue that—to meet this social objective of optimal innovation in personalized healthcare—payers, as agents of their plan participants, should aim to send clear signals to their suppliers about what they value. We begin by revisiting the concept of value from an economic perspective, and argue that a broader concept of value is needed in the context of personalized healthcare. We discuss the market for personalized healthcare and the interplay between price and reimbursement. We close by emphasizing the potential barrier posed by inflexible or cost-based reimbursement systems, especially for biomarker-based predictive tests, and how these personalized technologies have global public goods characteristics that require global value-based differential pricing to achieve dynamic efficiency in terms of the optimal rate of innovation and adoption. Full article
Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessCommentary
Personalized Computational Models as Biomarkers
J. Pers. Med. 2017, 7(3), 9; https://doi.org/10.3390/jpm7030009
Received: 20 July 2017 / Revised: 29 August 2017 / Accepted: 30 August 2017 / Published: 1 September 2017
Cited by 3 | PDF Full-text (175 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Biomarkers are cornerstones of clinical medicine, and personalized medicine, in particular, is highly dependent on reliable and highly accurate biomarkers for individualized diagnosis and treatment choice. Modern omics technologies, such as genome sequencing, allow molecular profiling of individual patients with unprecedented resolution, but [...] Read more.
Biomarkers are cornerstones of clinical medicine, and personalized medicine, in particular, is highly dependent on reliable and highly accurate biomarkers for individualized diagnosis and treatment choice. Modern omics technologies, such as genome sequencing, allow molecular profiling of individual patients with unprecedented resolution, but biomarkers based on these technologies often lack the dynamic element to follow the progression of a disease or response to therapy. Here, we discuss computational models as a new conceptual approach to biomarker discovery and design. Being able to integrate a large amount of information, including dynamic information, computational models can simulate disease evolution and response to therapy with high sensitivity and specificity. By populating these models with personal data, they can be highly individualized and will provide a powerful new tool in the armory of personalized medicine. Full article
J. Pers. Med. EISSN 2075-4426 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
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