Special Issue "Advancements and New Technologies in Clinical Dentistry"

A special issue of Journal of Clinical Medicine (ISSN 2077-0383). This special issue belongs to the section "Stomatology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 May 2021.

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Rosalia Maria Leonardi
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of General Surgery and Surgical-Medical Specialties, School of Dentistry, University of Catania, Catania, Italy
Interests: digital dentistry; imaging; orthodontics; TMJ disorders; oral pathology; oral cancer; orofacial pain; craniofacial growth; oral health; general health; quality of life
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The continuous research and updates in medical technology are irreversibly changing the approach of dentists to the diagnosis, treatment plan strategies, and decision-making processes. With the new available technologies and equipment, it is now easier to reach a comprehensive approach to rehabilitative planning involving different dental specialists as well as improve the effectiveness and efficiency of the treatment, optimize the patient experience, and streamline operations in dental practice.

This Special Issue aims to update the current clinical approaches with new innovative advances and knowledge in the field of dentistry. Potential topics in this Special Issue include but are not limited to in vivo and in vitro studies involving innovative technologies and materials, such as digital equipment, CAD-CAM systems, robot dentists, Artificial Intelligence (AI) and Robotics, natural dental products, custom implant using threedimensional printing (3DP), high-tech radiology, and new techniques and materials for functional and aesthetic facial and dental rehabilitations.

We especially welcome interventional studies aiming at improving the knowledge of new techniques/advances in clinical dentistry. Studies incorporating new clinical approaches or providing novel information are of higher priority. Reviews including studies using conceptual frameworks on any of the aforementioned topics will also be welcomed.

Prof. Rosalia Maria Leonardi
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Journal of Clinical Medicine is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2200 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • digital dentistry
  • dental imaging
  • oral pathology
  • oral cancer
  • TMJ disorders
  • orofacial pain
  • new technologies in orthodontics

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle
Vertical Bite Rehabilitation of Severely Worn Dentitions with Direct Composite Restorations: Clinical Performance up to 11 Years
J. Clin. Med. 2021, 10(8), 1732; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm10081732 - 16 Apr 2021
Viewed by 163
Abstract
Our aim was to evaluate the clinical performance of direct composite restorations placed in patients with severely worn dentitions at an increased vertical dimension of occlusion, after up to 11 years. One hundred and sixty-four teeth in 13 patients with severely worn dentitions [...] Read more.
Our aim was to evaluate the clinical performance of direct composite restorations placed in patients with severely worn dentitions at an increased vertical dimension of occlusion, after up to 11 years. One hundred and sixty-four teeth in 13 patients with severely worn dentitions had been reconstructed with either microhybrid (first cohort; n = 59) or nanofilled (second cohort; n = 105) composite restorations at increased vertical dimension of occlusion using a wax-up-based template-aided placement technique. From the dental records, information about repair and replacement of restorations was obtained. Patients were clinically examined after a mean follow-up time of 10.7 years (first cohort) or 5.2 years (second cohort) using United States Public Health Service (USPHS) criteria. Subjective patient satisfaction was also recorded using visual analogue scales (VAS). The overall quality of the restorations was good with predominantly ‘Alpha’ and ‘Bravo’ scores, respectively. Nanofilled composite showed less surface degradation and better margin qualities than microhybrid composite. Of the 59 restored teeth in the first cohort, 13 restorations showed unfavorable events after 10.7 years, of which ten could be repaired. In the second cohort, 23 of 105 restorations showed unfavorable events, which could all be repaired. VAS scores revealed high patient satisfaction with the treatment approach. In conclusion, direct composite restorations placed at an increased vertical dimension of occlusion show good clinical long-term performance in patients with severe tooth wear. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advancements and New Technologies in Clinical Dentistry)
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Open AccessArticle
Digital Assessment of Gingival Dimensions of Healthy Periodontium
J. Clin. Med. 2021, 10(8), 1550; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm10081550 - 07 Apr 2021
Viewed by 293
Abstract
The aim of the present study was to re-visit the gingival dimension using digital scanning in a healthy Korean population. Forty-eight periodontally healthy volunteers (38 males and 10 females, mean age: 24.3 ± 2.2 years) were included. The mucogingival junction was highlighted using [...] Read more.
The aim of the present study was to re-visit the gingival dimension using digital scanning in a healthy Korean population. Forty-eight periodontally healthy volunteers (38 males and 10 females, mean age: 24.3 ± 2.2 years) were included. The mucogingival junction was highlighted using 2.5% diluted iodine solution. Then, the facial gingiva and mucosa of both jaws were digitally scanned using an intraoral digital scanner. Using computer software and periodontal probing, the heights and areas of keratinized gingiva (KG) and attached gingiva (AG) were measured. Similar distribution patterns in the gingival heights were noted in the maxilla and mandible. The maxilla showed substantially greater gingival values than the mandible. The heights of the KG and AG were notably smaller on the mandibular first premolar (2.37 mm and 1.07 mm, median value) and second molar (3.28 mm and 1.78 mm) than on the other teeth. The area of the KG was the largest in the canine (63.74 mm2 and 46.85 mm2) and first molar (64.14 mm2 and 58.82 mm2) in each jaw. Mandibular first and second molars, mandibular canine, and maxillary canine showed the highest value of the area under the receiver operation characteristics curve (>0.7) for differentiating between males and females. The gingival dimensions recorded using intraoral scanner demonstrated similar distribution patterns as in previous studies. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advancements and New Technologies in Clinical Dentistry)
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Open AccessArticle
Stannous Fluoride Preventive Effect on Enamel Erosion: An In Vitro Study
J. Clin. Med. 2020, 9(9), 2755; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm9092755 - 26 Aug 2020
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Abstract
The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the effects of a single dose application of two daily toothpastes on enamel exposed to acid attack. The research was conducted on human molars enamel fragments (n = 72). The two different [...] Read more.
The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the effects of a single dose application of two daily toothpastes on enamel exposed to acid attack. The research was conducted on human molars enamel fragments (n = 72). The two different toothpastes active ingredients were sodium fluoride (NaF) and stannous fluoride (SnF2). They were compared in protecting the surface of the enamel exposed to three acids: citric acid, lactic acid and hydrochloric acid. A spectrophotometer was used to measure the calcium ions and phosphate released in the solutions by the enamel specimens. Afterward, ionic concentrations were analyzed through the t-Student test, in order to estimate the significance level (p < 0.05) of the solubility differences obtained between the treatment and control groups. Finally, sample surfaces were analyzed with scanning electron microscopy and X-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy (SEM/EDX). The two analyzed toothpastes did not reveal any statistically significant variation in the release of calcium and phosphate (p > 0.05). Nevertheless, acid-resistant deposits were detected in samples treated with stannous fluoride and exposed to lactic acid, though the presence of tin ion deposits on samples treated with stannous fluoride was not shown. A single dose of a fluoride-based toothpaste before different acids attack, in simulated oral cavity conditions, did not show a significant preventive effect. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advancements and New Technologies in Clinical Dentistry)
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Review

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Open AccessReview
Conceptual Model for Using Imidazoline Derivative Solutions in Pulpal Management
J. Clin. Med. 2021, 10(6), 1212; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm10061212 - 15 Mar 2021
Viewed by 246
Abstract
Alpha-adrenergic agonists, such as the Imidazoline derivatives (ImDs) of oxymetazoline and xylometazoline, are highly effective hemostatic agents. ImDs have not been widely used in dentistry but their use in medicine, specifically in ophthalmology and otolaryngology, warrants consideration for pulpal hemostasis. This review presents [...] Read more.
Alpha-adrenergic agonists, such as the Imidazoline derivatives (ImDs) of oxymetazoline and xylometazoline, are highly effective hemostatic agents. ImDs have not been widely used in dentistry but their use in medicine, specifically in ophthalmology and otolaryngology, warrants consideration for pulpal hemostasis. This review presents dental healthcare professionals with an overview of ImDs in medicine. ImD solutions have the potential to be more effective and biocompatible than existing topical hemostatic compounds in pulpal management. Through a comprehensive analysis of the pharmacology of ImDs and the microphysiology of hemostasis regulation in oral tissues, a conceptual model of pulpal management by ImD solutions is presented. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advancements and New Technologies in Clinical Dentistry)
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