Special Issue "The Global Burden of Occupational Noise Exposure"

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Occupational Safety and Health".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 September 2020.

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Massimo Ralli
Website
Guest Editor
Sapienza Università di Roma, Roma, Italy
Interests: head and neck cancer; autoimmunity in cancer; mechanisms of invasion; laryngeal cancer surgery; electrochemotherapy
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Prof. Richard Salvi
Website
Guest Editor
State University of New York at Buffalo, United States
Interests: tinnitus; hearing; noise-induced hearing loss; hyperacusis; central auditory system
Dr. Adam Sheppard
Website
Guest Editor
State University of New York at Buffalo, United States
Interests: hearing loss; noise exposure; otoacoustic emissions; tinnitus

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Occupational noise exposure is a global health hazard with considerable social and physiological impacts; it is estimated that in the United States only, over 22 million workers are exposed to hazardous noise at work.

Elevated workplace noise can cause hearing loss, tinnitus, hypertension, cardiovascular diseases, performance decrement, stress, annoyance, sleep disorders, reduced temporal processing skills, immunodepression, and birth defects. Furthermore, evidence suggests an association between occupational noise and increased accident and injury risk following distraction, irritability, increased fatigue and prolonged reaction time.

An increasing number of studies suggests that adverse effects of occupational noise exposure can occur with exposures lower than many current occupational noise exposure limits. Therefore, it is important to focus attention on this public health threat and on its consequences in the medium and long term.

This Special Issue welcomes original and review studies in any subject area related to the effects of occupational exposure on human health, with a special focus on its impact on quality of life.

Dr. Massimo Ralli
Prof. Richard Salvi
Dr. Adam Sheppard
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2300 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • noise
  • occupational noise exposure
  • quality of life
  • noise-induced hearing loss
  • tinnitus
  • hypertension
  • ischemic heart disease
  • sleep disorders
  • occupational injury
  • immunodepression

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Productivity Burden of Occupational Noise-Induced Hearing Loss in Australia: A Life Table Modelling Study
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(13), 4667; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17134667 - 29 Jun 2020
Abstract
Background: Occupational noise-induced hearing loss (ONIHL) is one of the most common yet preventable occupational diseases. The aim of this study was to estimate the economic burden of ONIHL in the Australian working population by quantifying and monetising ONIHL—related loss of Quality Adjusted [...] Read more.
Background: Occupational noise-induced hearing loss (ONIHL) is one of the most common yet preventable occupational diseases. The aim of this study was to estimate the economic burden of ONIHL in the Australian working population by quantifying and monetising ONIHL—related loss of Quality Adjusted Life Years (QALY) and Productivity Adjusted Life Years (PALYs). Methods: We simulated the number of moderate-to-severe ONIHL by multiplying the age-specific prevalence of occupational noise exposure by the excess risks of ONIHL. Life table modelling was applied to workers with ONIHL. The QALY and PALY weights attributable to hearing loss were sourced from published data. The 2016 Gross Domestic Product per full-time equivalent worker in Australia was used to estimate the cost of productivity loss due to ONIHL. The cost due to the loss of well-being was quantified using willingness to pay thresholds derived from an Australian longitudinal study. Results: Under current occupational noise exposure levels in Australia, we estimated that over 80,000 male workers and over 31,000 female workers would develop ONIHL over 10 years of exposure. Following this cohort until the age of 65 years, the estimated loss of QALYs and PALYs were 62,218 and 135,561 respectively, with a projected loss of AUD 5.5 billion and AUD 21.3 billion due to well-being and productivity loss, respectively. Reducing noise exposure at work would substantially reduce the economic burden of ONIHL. Conclusion: ONIHL imposes substantial burden on Australian economy. Interventions to reduce occupational noise exposure are warranted. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Global Burden of Occupational Noise Exposure)
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