Special Issue "Methodologies and Applications of Geographic Information Science and Spatial Statistical Analysis in Public Health"

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Global Health".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 15 November 2019.

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Jane Law
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
1. School of Public Health and Health Systems, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, ON N2L 3G1, Canada
2. School of Planning, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, ON N2L 3G1, Canada
Prof. Henry Hui Luan
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Geography, College of Arts and Sciences, University of Oregon, Eugene, OR 97403, USA

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The use of Geographic Information Sciences (GIScience) and spatial statistical analysis has emerged as an innovative component in the field of Public Health. Great attention has been paid to analyzing spatial and spatiotemporal data; locations; and spatial interaction in understanding public health issues. Applying GIScience or/and spatial statistics, spatial epidemiologists, health geographers, biostatisticians and public health professionals have made significant contributions in understanding problems such as disease clusters and environmental risk factors, and targeting interventions to improve public health. Through analysis and mapping of spatial data from single or multiple sources, GIScience and spatial statistical analysis have been shown as effective tools for assisting policymakers to study diseases, environmental problems, health inequity, and health care in public health.

This Special Issue seeks papers that demonstrate original research with innovative methodologies and applications of GIScience and spatial statistical analysis in the field of public health. The aim of this call is to provide a strong overview of the GIScience and technological advances of spatial methodology in public health, invoke new ways of thinking about how public health programs can be better accomplished, and stimulate new ideas to use GIScience and spatial statistics in public health. Both methodologies for analyzing spatial data and their applications in public health will be considered for this special issue.

Prof. Jane Law
Prof. Henry Hui Luan
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Geographic Information Systems (GIS)
  • Spatial and spatiotemporal epidemiology
  • Community/Neighborhood health
  • GIS applications in epidemiology and public health research
  • Bayesian disease mapping
  • Health geomatics
  • Health inequities
  • Health geography
  • Health surveillance
  • Public health intervention
  • Healthcare planning

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Mapping Variation in Breast Cancer Screening: Where to Intervene?
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(13), 2274; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16132274 - 27 Jun 2019
Abstract
Small geographic areas with lower mammography screening participation rates may reflect gaps in screening efforts. Our objective was to use spatial analyses to understand disparities in mammography screening use and to identify factors to increase its uptake in areas that need it in [...] Read more.
Small geographic areas with lower mammography screening participation rates may reflect gaps in screening efforts. Our objective was to use spatial analyses to understand disparities in mammography screening use and to identify factors to increase its uptake in areas that need it in Lyon metropolitan area, France. Data for screened women between the ages of 50 and 74 were analyzed. Census blocks of screened and non screened women were extracted from the mammography screening programme 2015–2016 dataset. We used spatial regression models, within a generalized additive framework to determine clusters of census blocks with significantly higher prevalence of non-participation of mammography screening. Smoothed risk maps were crude and adjusted on the following covariates: deprivation index and opportunistic screening. Among 178,002 women aged 50 to 74, 49.9% received mammography screening. As hypothesized, women living in highly deprived census blocks had lower participation rates compared to less deprived blocks, 45.2% vs. 51.4% p < 0.001. Spatial analyses identified four clusters, one located in an urban area and three in suburban areas. Moreover, depending on the location of the cluster, the influence came from different variables. Knowing the impact of site-specific risk factors seems to be important for implementing an appropriate prevention intervention. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Spatiotemporal Heterogeneity in the Distribution of Chikungunya and Zika Virus Case Incidences during their 2014 to 2016 Epidemics in Barranquilla, Colombia
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(10), 1759; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16101759 - 18 May 2019
Abstract
Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) and Zika virus (ZIKV) have recently emerged as globally important infections. This study aimed to explore the spatiotemporal heterogeneity in the occurrence of CHIKV and ZIKV outbreaks throughout the major international seaport city of Barranquilla, Colombia in 2014 and 2016 [...] Read more.
Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) and Zika virus (ZIKV) have recently emerged as globally important infections. This study aimed to explore the spatiotemporal heterogeneity in the occurrence of CHIKV and ZIKV outbreaks throughout the major international seaport city of Barranquilla, Colombia in 2014 and 2016 and the potential for clustering. Incidence data were fitted using multiple Bayesian Poisson models based on multiple explanatory variables as potential risk factors identified from other studies and options for random effects. A best fit model was used to analyse their case incidence risks and identify any risk factors during their epidemics. Neighbourhoods in the northern region were hotspots for both CHIKV and ZIKV outbreaks. Additional hotspots occurred in the southwestern and some eastern/southeastern areas during their outbreaks containing part of, or immediately adjacent to, the major circular city road with its import/export cargo warehouses and harbour area. Multivariate conditional autoregressive models strongly identified higher socioeconomic strata and living in a neighbourhood near a major road as risk factors for ZIKV case incidences. These findings will help to appropriately focus vector control efforts but also challenge the belief that these infections are driven by social vulnerability and merit further study both in Barranquilla and throughout the world’s tropical and subtropical regions. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
A Time-Based Objective Measure of Exposure to the Food Environment
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(7), 1180; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16071180 - 02 Apr 2019
Cited by 1
Abstract
Exposure to food environments has mainly been limited to counting food outlets near participants’ homes. This study considers food environment exposures in time and space using global positioning systems (GPS) records and fast food restaurants (FFRs) as the environment of interest. Data came [...] Read more.
Exposure to food environments has mainly been limited to counting food outlets near participants’ homes. This study considers food environment exposures in time and space using global positioning systems (GPS) records and fast food restaurants (FFRs) as the environment of interest. Data came from 412 participants (median participant age of 45) in the Seattle Obesity Study II who completed a survey, wore GPS receivers, and filled out travel logs for seven days. FFR locations were obtained from Public Health Seattle King County and geocoded. Exposure was conceptualized as contact between stressors (FFRs) and receptors (participants’ mobility records from GPS data) using four proximities: 21 m, 100 m, 500 m, and ½ mile. Measures included count of proximal FFRs, time duration in proximity to ≥1 FFR, and time duration in proximity to FFRs weighted by FFR counts. Self-reported exposures (FFR visits) were excluded from these measures. Logistic regressions tested associations between one or more reported FFR visits and the three exposure measures at the four proximities. Time spent in proximity to an FFR was associated with significantly higher odds of FFR visits at all proximities. Weighted duration also showed positive associations with FFR visits at 21-m and 100-m proximities. FFR counts were not associated with FFR visits. Duration of exposure helps measure the relationship between the food environment, mobility patterns, and health behaviors. The stronger associations between exposure and outcome found at closer proximities (<100 m) need further research. Full article
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