Special Issue "Daily Travel and Wellbeing among the Elderly"

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Health Behavior, Chronic Disease and Health Promotion".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (15 October 2019).

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Margareta Friman
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Social and Psychological Studies, and Service Research Center, Karlstad University, Sweden
Interests: subjective wellbeing, travel, sustainability, quality
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Assoc. Prof. Lars E. Olsson
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Social and Psychological Studies, and Service Research Center, Karlstad University, Sweden
Interests: subjective wellbeing, travel behavior, decision making, sustainability
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

We are organizing a Special Issue on daily travel and wellbeing among the elderly in the International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. The venue is a peer-reviewed scientific journal that publishes articles and communications in the interdisciplinary area of environmental health sciences and public health. For detailed information on the journal, we refer you to https://www.mdpi.com/journal/ijerph.

The purpose of this Special Issue is to introduce and demonstrate the importance of daily travel in elderly people’s lives. In doing so, we wish to bring together distinguished researchers from a variety of academic backgrounds to provide reviews, conceptual papers, and empirical studies with the aim to present recent advances in this emerging field. The overall goal is to provide a broad understanding of the links between psychological wellbeing and travel; the importance of daily travel; and different evaluations and measures to assess the experience of daily travel and quality of life among the elderly.

This Special Issue is open to any subject area related to daily travel and wellbeing among the elderly. The listed keywords suggest just a few of the many possibilities.

Prof. Dr. Margareta Friman
Assoc. Prof. Lars E. Olsson
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Daily travel
  • Mode use
  • Travel behavior
  • Travel experiences
  • Aging
  • Older people
  • Subjective wellbeing
  • Psychological wellbeing
  • Life satisfaction
  • Accessibility
  • Social inclusion
  • Daily activities

Published Papers (4 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Open AccessArticle
Access to Services in Rural Areas from the Point of View of Older Population—A Case Study in Finland
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(23), 4854; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16234854 - 02 Dec 2019
Abstract
Independence and having control over one’s own life are important factors for residential satisfaction. In rural areas, the mobility of people is based on owning a private car, due to the lack of public transport. Furthermore, planning in rural municipalities is highly car [...] Read more.
Independence and having control over one’s own life are important factors for residential satisfaction. In rural areas, the mobility of people is based on owning a private car, due to the lack of public transport. Furthermore, planning in rural municipalities is highly car oriented. Small municipalities with shrinking and aging populations have many challenges to ensure access to services for their residents. This paper focuses on a case study of a small municipality with less than 2000 inhabitants. The objective of the study was to enhance sustainable change in shrinking rural areas and maintain them as good places to live even in the future. Access to local services and social activities is a major challenge for older people, who no longer have the possibility to use their own car. The problem with relocation is the lack of suitable apartments for older people. A dense and walkable municipal centre with accessible apartments may help municipalities provide for their older populations. Moreover, in Finland, second homeowners are an important resource for small municipalities. Spaces for social intercourse between residents and between permanent residents and second homeowners may enhance vitality and community building in these municipalities. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Daily Travel and Wellbeing among the Elderly)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
Perceived Accessibility, Satisfaction with Daily Travel, and Life Satisfaction among the Elderly
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(22), 4498; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16224498 - 14 Nov 2019
Abstract
People are living longer than they did previously, and the proportion of older people is increasing worldwide. This rapid development will have implications for the transport system, in general, and for travel behavior and accessibility to daily activities, in particular. In recent years, [...] Read more.
People are living longer than they did previously, and the proportion of older people is increasing worldwide. This rapid development will have implications for the transport system, in general, and for travel behavior and accessibility to daily activities, in particular. In recent years, both research and politics have drawn the attention of the public to issues affecting the opportunities of the elderly to participate in everyday life. The debate has so far mostly focused on health issues, with limited work having been done on the ability of the elderly to live the lives they want to considering how they travel. With this view, a theoretical model, grounded in a model of travel and subjective wellbeing was developed to explore the role of perceived accessibility in satisfaction with travel and life satisfaction. Empirical data were collected from a sample of 2950 respondents (aged 60–92) from five cities in Northern Europe (Stockholm, Helsinki, Oslo, Copenhagen, Bergen) and analyzed using partial least square structural equation modeling (PLS-SEM). The findings confirmed the link between perceived accessibility, travel satisfaction, and life satisfaction. The findings also showed the role of sociodemographic and travel attributes in perceived accessibility and satisfaction with travel, as well as the moderating effects of different age groups. We conclude that this moderating role played by age clearly indicates that we should not treat the elderly as a homogenous group in research and transport planning. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Daily Travel and Wellbeing among the Elderly)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
Loneliness and Life Satisfaction Explained by Public-Space Use and Mobility Patterns
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(21), 4282; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16214282 - 04 Nov 2019
Abstract
Previous research has shown that personal, neighborhood, and mobility characteristics could influence life satisfaction and loneliness of people and that exposure to public spaces, such as green spaces, may also affect the extent to which people feel lonely or satisfied with life. However, [...] Read more.
Previous research has shown that personal, neighborhood, and mobility characteristics could influence life satisfaction and loneliness of people and that exposure to public spaces, such as green spaces, may also affect the extent to which people feel lonely or satisfied with life. However, previous studies mainly focused on one of these effects, resulting in a lack of knowledge about the simultaneous effects of these characteristics on loneliness and life satisfaction. This study therefore aims to gain insights into how public-space use mediates the relations between personal, neighborhood, and mobility characteristics on the one hand and loneliness and life satisfaction on the other hand. Relationships were analyzed using a path analysis approach, based on a sample of 200 residents of three neighborhoods of the Dutch city ‘s-Hertogenbosch. The results showed that the influence of frequency of public-space use on life satisfaction and loneliness is limited. The effects of personal, neighborhood, and mobility characteristics on frequency of use of public space and on loneliness and life satisfaction were found to be significant. Age and activities of daily living (ADL) are significantly related to each other, and ADL was found to influence recreational and passive space use and loneliness and life satisfaction. Policymakers should, therefore, mainly focus on creating neighborhoods that are highly walkable and accessible, where green spaces and public-transport facilities are present, to promote physical activity among all residents. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Daily Travel and Wellbeing among the Elderly)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
Developing A Model of Mobility Capital for An Ageing Population
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(18), 3327; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16183327 - 10 Sep 2019
Abstract
Driving a car meets older people’s needs, providing utility (getting from A to B), psychosocial (providing identity and roles and feelings of independence and normality) and aesthetic (mobility for its own sake) mobilities. Giving up driving is related to poorer health and wellbeing. [...] Read more.
Driving a car meets older people’s needs, providing utility (getting from A to B), psychosocial (providing identity and roles and feelings of independence and normality) and aesthetic (mobility for its own sake) mobilities. Giving up driving is related to poorer health and wellbeing. This paper addresses how older people cope when they give up driving, using Bourdieu’s theory of capital as a way of categorising different barriers and enablers to managing without a car in a hypermobile society. Older people are most likely to mention barriers and enablers to mobility relating to infrastructure capital (technology, services, roads, pavements, finance and economics), followed by social capital (friends, family, neighbourhood and community). Cultural capital (norms, expectations, rules, laws) and individual capital (skills, abilities, resilience, adaptation and desire and willingness to change) are less important but still significantly contribute to older people’s mobility. Implications for policy and practice suggest that provision for older people beyond the car must explore capital across all four of the domains. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Daily Travel and Wellbeing among the Elderly)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop