Special Issue "Microbial Biofilms-Implications for Healthcare and Environment"

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Infectious Disease Epidemiology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 1 March 2022.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Ayesha Rahman
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
School of Pharmacy, Faculty of Science and Engineering, University of Wolverhampton, Wolverhampton WV1 1LY, UK
Interests: To implement a holistic approach to study and address the threat of antimicrobial resistance (AMR) by developing novel antimicrobial agents (synthesis and characterisation of heterocyclic compounds) and adjuvants (amino acids) that enhance antimicrobial efficacy of existing antibiotics, particularly against biofilms; To study the clinical effectiveness of antibiotics, used therapeutically and prophylactically, by undertaking systematic reviews and metaanalyses of existing clinical evidence
Dr. Hazel Gibson
E-Mail Website
Assistant Guest Editor
School of Sciences, Faculty of Science and Engineering, University of Wolverhampton, Wolverhampton WV1 1LY, UK
Interests: investigating the attachment and inactivation of pathogens by a range of antimicrobial agents including disinfectants, antibiotics and natural antimicrobials such as spices and components; studies on the removal and inactivation of biofilms; optimization of antimicrobial effectiveness through combinations of treatments to enhance dispersal and/or increase susceptibility; development and assessment of the effectiveness of novel antimicrobial wound dressings using bacterial cellulose
Dr. Shivanthi Samarasinghe
E-Mail Website
Assistant Guest Editor
Leicester School of Allied Health Sciences, Faculty of Health Sciences, De Montfort University, The Gateway, Leicester LE1 9BH, UK
Interests: understand the prevalence, virulence characteristic of biofilm development, quorum sensing (bacterial communication), and mechanisms of resistance (Extended-spectrum Beta-Lactamase and Carbapenum producing) of Enterobacterales associated with common bacterial infections; pathogenic role of oral microbes and assess the susceptibility/resistance development; whole Genome Sequencing microbial pathogens to assess the pathogenic/virulence/resistance characteristics; development of novel Quantitative Real-Time PCR-based methods to diagnose antibiotic-resistant pathogens; analysis of therapeutic potential and efficacy of the natural antimicrobials as quorum sensing/biofilm inhibitors

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Biofilms are structured consortia of bacteria surrounded by an extracellular polymeric substance (EPS) that provides resistance to antibiotics, disinfectants and the host immune response. Bacteria residing in biofilms are up to 1000 times more resistant to antibiotics than planktonic cells, which adds to the growing threat of antimicrobial resistance (AMR). Microbial biofilms play a prominent role in causing infections such as chronic cystic fibrosis (CF), chronic wound infections, urinary tract infections and medical device-related infections. Biofilms, which have clinical and environmental significance, are formed by microorganisms such as Staphylococcus spp., E.coli, Streptococcus spp., Klebsiella pneumoniae and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Besides their notoriety, biofilms are also beneficial and are used in bioremediation to degrade pollutants. Recently extensive research is being undertaken to study the impact of biofilms in healthcare settings and the environment with emphasis laid on developing novel anti-biofilm agents that disrupt or inhibit biofilms. In addition, microbial strains are employed to degrade and detoxify environmental pollutants. This Special Issue will collate and publish recent and ongoing research in these areas. Therefore, we would like to invite you to submit your unpublished work in the form of reviews, original research articles, short communications, case reports, etc.

Dr. Ayesha Rahman
Dr. Hazel Gibson
Dr. Shivanthi Samarasinghe
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2300 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Microorganisms
  • Biofilms
  • Infections
  • Healthcare
  • Environment
  • Clinical
  • Antimicrobial agents
  • Anti-biofilm agents
  • Antimicrobial resistance (AMR) and bioremediation

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Review

Review
Staphylococcus aureus Biofilm: Morphology, Genetics, Pathogenesis and Treatment Strategies
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(14), 7602; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18147602 - 16 Jul 2021
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1296
Abstract
Staphylococcus aureus is a nosocomial bacterium causing different infectious diseases, ranging from skin and soft tissue infections to more serious and life-threatening infections such as septicaemia. S. aureus forms a complex structure of extracellular polymeric biofilm that provides a fully secured and functional [...] Read more.
Staphylococcus aureus is a nosocomial bacterium causing different infectious diseases, ranging from skin and soft tissue infections to more serious and life-threatening infections such as septicaemia. S. aureus forms a complex structure of extracellular polymeric biofilm that provides a fully secured and functional environment for the formation of microcolonies, their sustenance and recolonization of sessile cells after its dispersal. Staphylococcus aureus biofilm protects the cells against hostile conditions, i.e., changes in temperature, limitations or deprivation of nutrients and dehydration, and, more importantly, protects the cells against antibacterial drugs. Drugs are increasingly becoming partially or fully inactive against S. aureus as they are either less penetrable or totally impenetrable due to the presence of biofilms surrounding the bacterial cells. Other factors, such as evasion of innate host immune system, genome plasticity and adaptability through gene evolution and exchange of genetic material, also contribute to the ineffectiveness of antibacterial drugs. This increasing tolerance to antibiotics has contributed to the emergence and rise of antimicrobial resistance (AMR), a serious problem that has resulted in increased morbidity and mortality of human and animal populations globally, in addition to causing huge financial losses to the global economy. The purpose of this review is to highlight different aspects of S. aureus biofilm formation and its overall architecture, individual biofilm constituents, clinical implications and role in pathogenesis and drug resistance. The review also discusses different techniques used in the qualitative and quantitative investigation of S. aureus biofilm and various strategies that can be employed to inhibit and eradicate S. aureus biofilm. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Microbial Biofilms-Implications for Healthcare and Environment)
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