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Emerging Issues in Metals Toxicology

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Environmental Science and Engineering".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 December 2021)

Image courtesy of Jacques Gardon

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
1. Division of Occupational & Environmental Medicine, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21201, USA
2. Department of Chemistry, Center for Chemical Sensors—Chemical Imaging and Surface Analysis Center, University of Puerto Rico at Mayaguez, Mayaguez, PR 00681, USA
Interests: metals toxicology; environmental and toxicological pathology; occupational and forensic toxicology of metals; biomonitoring to metal exposures; human health and risk assessment to metal exposures; medical geology; metalloids and health effects; metals used in medical devices; biocompatibility of metals; regulatory sciences
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Metals (such as aluminum, chromium, copper, zinc), metalloids (such as arsenic), and metal alloys (a combination of metal elements) have been used in a wide range of industrial, commercial, medical, and consumer product applications. Additionally, concerns about exposures to toxic metals from natural geochemical sources such as soils, dust, and contaminated water have been the subject of numerous environmental, geochemical, and medical geology investigations, and many studies have been published describing the acute and/or chronic effects of high-level exposures to these types of agents and potential organ injury (e.g., cancer). Some of these studies have even raised concerns over the association of elevated metal ion levels with neurological and immune system events. Therefore, understanding the biological responses, toxicology, and environmental impact of metal ion exposure is of paramount importance in developing a comprehensive public health agenda.

This Special Issue of the International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (IJERPH) focuses on the current state of the art on emerging issues on metals toxicology. Original manuscripts and review articles are welcome, covering, but not limited to the following areas:

  • Biological responses and health effects from exposure to trace metals and metalloids
  • Novel analytical approaches for the analysis, speciation, and assessment of trace metals
  • Risk management, risk communication, and risk mitigation on toxic metal exposure
  • Epidemiology, occupational medicine, and forensic toxicology of metals
  • Novel clinical therapies and toxicological research on biomarkers of exposure
  • Biosurveillance and biomonitoring studies
  • Hydrogeology, water quality, and metals
  • Medical geology and metals
  • Nanotechnology and metals
  • Use of metals in medical devices
  • Bacterial-metal interactions
  • Geochemistry and environmental management of metals

Original research on these topics will be welcome for this Special Issue.

Dr. Jose A. Centeno
Dr. Jacques Gardon
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2500 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Toxicology and health effects of metals and metalloids
  • Environmental and occupational medicine of metals
  • Environmental pathology of metals
  • Biology and biocompatibility of metals used in medical devices
  • Biomonitoring, biosurveillance, and clinical research of metals
  • Medical geology research on metals
  • Bacterial-metal interactions
  • Geochemistry, hydrogeology and environmental management of metals

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

12 pages, 1253 KiB  
Article
Impact of Cations (Na+, K+, Mg+2) and Anions (F, Cl, SO42−) Leaching from Filters Packed with Natural Zeolite and Ferric Nanoparticles for Wastewater Treatment
by Evelyn Maria Miramontes-Gutierrez, Jesus Manuel Ochoa-Rivero, Hector Osbaldo Rubio-Arias, Lourdes Ballinas-Casarrubias and Beatriz Adriana Rocha-Gutiérrez
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(16), 8525; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18168525 - 12 Aug 2021
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1879
Abstract
Natural zeolites have been employed to adsorb contaminants in water. This study is aimed to evaluate the cation and anion leaching from the zeolite after the wastewater was passed through filters packed with a natural zeolite (heulandite-CaAl2Si7O18·6H [...] Read more.
Natural zeolites have been employed to adsorb contaminants in water. This study is aimed to evaluate the cation and anion leaching from the zeolite after the wastewater was passed through filters packed with a natural zeolite (heulandite-CaAl2Si7O18·6H2O). Eight treatments were evaluated in a 2 × 2 × 2 factorial treatment design. Factor A was the zeolite with two levels: 127 g and 80.4 g. Factor B was the nanoparticles with two levels: one bag (3.19 g) and two bags (6.39 g); and Factor C was the use of a magnet: with and without. There were two replications; hence, a total of 16 filters were employed. The water was obtained from a municipal wastewater treatment plant (MWTP). The cations (Na+, K+; Mg+2 and Ca+2) and anions (F, Cl and SO42−) were measured before (influent = IW) and after filtering (effluent = EW) three times. All treatments leached the cations Na+ (EW in a range of 175 to 232 ppm), K+ (EW in a range of 15.4 to 33.2 ppm), and Mg+2 (EW in a range of 7.40 to 10.8 ppm) but did not leach Ca+2. Likewise, the treatments leached the anions F (EW in a range of 7.59 to 8.87 ppm), Cl (EW in a range of 85.9 to 120 ppm), and SO42− (EW in a range of 139 to 146 ppm). We conclude that this natural zeolite leaches cations (except Ca+2) and anions in MWTP passed through filters. Therefore, its application in wastewater treatment should be considered for purposes such as agriculture and animal production and not for drinking water. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Emerging Issues in Metals Toxicology)
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15 pages, 1247 KiB  
Article
Issues and Challenges in the Application of the IEUBK Model in the Health Risk Assessment of Lead: A Case Study from Blantyre Malawi
by Wells Utembe and Mary Gulumian
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(15), 8207; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18158207 - 03 Aug 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1992
Abstract
The risk assessment of lead (Pb) requires the use of biokinetic models to translate measured concentrations of Pb in food and environmental media into blood lead (BPb). The aim of this study was to assess the applicability of the Integrated Exposure Uptake Biokinetic [...] Read more.
The risk assessment of lead (Pb) requires the use of biokinetic models to translate measured concentrations of Pb in food and environmental media into blood lead (BPb). The aim of this study was to assess the applicability of the Integrated Exposure Uptake Biokinetic (IEUBK) model in the health risk assessment of Pb among children in Blantyre. Children (152) aged 1–6 years were recruited into this cross-sectional study, and foods, house dust, playground soil, water, and venous blood (1 mL) were collected and analyzed for Pb. A seven-day food frequency questionnaire (FFQ) was used to collect food consumption data. The concentrations of Pb ranged from 0.01 to 3.3 mg/kg in food, 2.3 to 265 mg/kg and 1.5 to 482 mg/kg in house dust and playground soil, respectively, as well as 2.0 µg/dL to 50.4 µg/dL and 6.8 to 39.2 µg/dL for measured and predicted BPb, respectively. Various statistical tests indicated less than satisfactory agreement between measured and predicted BPb values. Despite the lack of reliable food consumption data and other limitations, both the predicted and measured BPb values indicate that children in Blantyre are exposed to high levels of Pb, largely through food and soil as a minor source. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Emerging Issues in Metals Toxicology)
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11 pages, 1477 KiB  
Article
A Case of Silicone and Sarcoid Granulomas in a Patient with “Highly Cohesive” Silicone Breast Implants: A Histopathologic and Laser Raman Microprobe Analysis
by Todor I. Todorov, Erik de Bakker, Diane Smith, Lisette C. Langenberg, Linda A. Murakata, Mark H. H. Kramer, Jose A. Centeno and Prabath W. B. Nanayakkara
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(9), 4526; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18094526 - 24 Apr 2021
Cited by 10 | Viewed by 5539
Abstract
Foreign body giant cell (FBGC) reaction to silicone material in the lymph nodes of patients with silicone breast implants has been documented in the literature, with a number of case reports dating back to 1978. Many of these case reports describe histologic features [...] Read more.
Foreign body giant cell (FBGC) reaction to silicone material in the lymph nodes of patients with silicone breast implants has been documented in the literature, with a number of case reports dating back to 1978. Many of these case reports describe histologic features of silicone lymphadenopathy in regional lymph nodes from patients with multiple sets of different types of implants, including single lumen smooth surface gel, single lumen textured surface gel, single lumen with polyethylene terephthalate patch, single lumen with polyurethane coating, and double lumen smooth surface. Only one other case report described a patient with highly-cohesive breast implants and silicone granulomas of the skin. In this article, we describe a patient with a clinical presentation of systemic sarcoidosis following highly cohesive breast implant placement. Histopathologic analysis and Confocal Laser Raman Microprobe (CLRM) examination were used to confirm the presence of silicone in the axillary lymph node and capsular tissues. This is the first report where chemical spectroscopic mapping has been used to establish and identify the coexistence of Schaumann bodies, consisting of calcium oxalate and calcium phosphate minerals, together with silicone implant material. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Emerging Issues in Metals Toxicology)
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