Special Issue "Type I Diabetes in Children and Adolescents"

A special issue of Healthcare (ISSN 2227-9032). This special issue belongs to the section "School Health".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 April 2021.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Biagio Rapone
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Leading Guest Editor
Department of Basic Medical Sciences, Neurosciences and Sense Organs, Bari, Italy; “Aldo Moro” University of Bari, 70122 Bari, Italy
Interests: type I Diabetes; childood; adolescence; pediatric diabetes; systemic inflammation; peripheral inflammation; dentistry; malignant tumours; endocrine system; endocrinology; tumor aggressiveness
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. Maurizio Delvecchio
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Guest Editor
Department of Metabolic and Genetic Diseases, Giovanni XXIII Children's Hospital, 70126 Bari, Italy
Interests: type I Diabetes; childood; pediatric diabetes; systemic inflammation; peripheral inflammation; endocrine system; endocrinology
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. Antonio Gnoni

Guest Editor
Università degli Studi di Bari, Bari, Italy
Interests: type I Diabetes; childood; pediatric diabetes; systemic inflammation; peripheral inflammation; endocrine system; endocrinology
Dr. Elisabetta Ferrara

Guest Editor
SS Annunziata Hospital, Chieti, Italy
Interests: type I Diabetes; childood; pediatric diabetes; systemic inflammation; peripheral inflammation; endocrine system; endocrinology

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

As a key contributor to metabolic diseases, the pro-inflammatory response is the focal point of the area of metabolic inflammation research. Particularly, children and adolescents affected by type I diabetes are exposed to a high risk of systemic complications and require multifactorial risk-reduction strategies beyond glycemic control. The advances in research, combined with the evolution of treatment planning, may empower clinicians with enhanced findings. This concept allows for a new paradigm to be developed, which may integrate current diagnostic and therapeutic approaches. Future investigation is experiencing a huge increase in the use of data driven by peripheral inflammation examination that may increase the systemic response. There are increasingly complex questions, with a need to leverage data to identify risk factors and potential correlations between type 1 diabetes in childhood and adolescence. This Special Issue focuses on high-quality research papers that address significant developments in the emerging knowledge about type I diabetes in childhood and adolescence. It invites high-quality research contributions from a wide range of professions. Original research papers and state-of-the-art reviews will be accepted. Suggested topics include: current concepts about the role of inflammation in diabetic children and adolescents; the development of new treatment strategies for type I diabetes; and the systemic effect of peripheral inflammation in pediatric diabetes.

Dr. Biagio Rapone
Dr. Maurizio Delvecchio
Dr. Antonio Gnoni
Dr. Elisabetta Ferrara
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Healthcare is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • type I diabetes
  • childhood
  • adolescence
  • pediatric diabetes
  • systemic inflammation
  • peripheral inflammation

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Long-Term HbA1c, Physical Fitness, Nerve Conduction Velocities, and Quality of Life in Children with Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus—A Pilot Study
Healthcare 2020, 8(4), 384; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare8040384 - 03 Oct 2020
Abstract
Objective: The aim of this study was to examine a possible association of HbA1c, quality of life (QoL), fitness, and electrophysiological parameters in children with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM). Methods: The study population (n = 34) consisted of patients with [...] Read more.
Objective: The aim of this study was to examine a possible association of HbA1c, quality of life (QoL), fitness, and electrophysiological parameters in children with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM). Methods: The study population (n = 34) consisted of patients with T1DM (n = 17) and an age-, sex-, and BMI-matched healthy control group (n = 17). HbA1c was obtained from patients with T1DM at time of diagnosis (T0), at 6 months (T6), at 12 months (T12), and at time of study inclusion (Tstudy). QoL was determined with a standardized questionnaire (KINDL-R). All children completed a 6-min walk test (6MWT) to evaluate their fitness level. Electrodiagnostic studies established upper and lower limb motor and sensory nerve conduction velocities (NCV). Results: Higher HbA1c (Tstudy) was associated with lower QoL showing in the subscales self-esteem, friends, and school. Higher HbA1c at (T6) and (T12) was associated with lower QoL in the subscale self-esteem. Based on various subscales, perceived problem areas differed significantly between children and their parents. No differences in fitness level and NCV were found between patients and controls except for a significantly slower median motor NCV in patients. HbA1c was not associated with NCVs at this early stage of disease. Conclusions: Good metabolic control reflected by adequate HbA1c values seems to be important for a good QoL in children with T1DM. Early HbA1c might be associated with QoL during follow-up. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Type I Diabetes in Children and Adolescents)
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