Special Issue "Innovations in the Emergency Department"

A special issue of Healthcare (ISSN 2227-9032). This special issue belongs to the section "Healthcare Quality and Patient Safety".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 May 2021.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Kimberly Won
Website
Guest Editor
Department of Pharmacy Practice, Chapman University School of Pharmacy; Department of MMS Physician Assistant Studies, Chapman University Crean College of Health and Behavioral Sciences, Irvine, CA, USA; Providence St. Joseph Mission Hospital, Mission Viejo, CA, USA
Interests: emergency medicine; critical care; toxicology; acute pain management; interprofessional education; simulation; instructional technologies
Dr. Alisa Wray
Website
Guest Editor
Department of Emergency Medicine; University of California, Irvine, CA, USA;
Director of Clinical Skills Assessment, University of California Irvine School of Medicine, Irvine, CA, USA
Interests: instructional design; instructional technologies; asynchronous learning; flipped curricula; team-based learning; problem-based learning; curriculum development; emergency medicine resident education; emergency medicine medical student education; undergraduate medical education; undergraduate medical student clinical skills; clinical skills; simulation; standardized patients; professional development; mentoring

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The emergency department (ED) is a busy healthcare setting that sees a wide array of varying acuity patients with a variety of chief complaints. This Special Issue of Healthcare will focus on innovations in the ED, including, but not limited to: technology in the ED, innovative strategies to improve patient flow in an overburdened healthcare system, public health initiatives in/from the ED, implementation of new protocols/procedures/teams to improve patient-centered outcomes, development of innovative tools/resources, interprofessional team development and/or collaboration, etc. We will mainly feature original research, including short reports, reviews, and clinical studies, but will also welcome case reports, descriptive/how-to, and commentary submissions for consideration.

Dr. Kimberly Won
Dr. Alisa Wray
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Healthcare is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Emergency department
  • Technology
  • Innovation
  • Patient-centered outcomes
  • Patient safety
  • Public health
  • Quality improvement

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
The Meaning of Boarding in a Swedish Accident & Emergency Department: A Qualitative Study on Patients’ Experiences of Awaiting Admission
Healthcare 2021, 9(1), 66; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare9010066 - 12 Jan 2021
Viewed by 355
Abstract
The number of in-hospital beds in Sweden has decreased during recent decades, resulting in the smallest number (2.2 available beds/1000 inhabitants) within the European Union. At the same time, the number of patients attending Accident and Emergency (A&E) departments has increased, resulting in [...] Read more.
The number of in-hospital beds in Sweden has decreased during recent decades, resulting in the smallest number (2.2 available beds/1000 inhabitants) within the European Union. At the same time, the number of patients attending Accident and Emergency (A&E) departments has increased, resulting in overcrowding and boarding. The aim of this study was to explore the meaning of being subjected to boarding at an A&E department, as experienced by patients. A phenomenological-hermeneutic approach was chosen to interpret and understand the meaning of boarding at A&E. The study was carried out at a hospital in the south of Sweden. Seventeen participants with a mean age of 64 years (range: 35–86 years) were interviewed. The thematic structural analysis covers seven themes: Being in a state of uncertainty, Feeling abandoned, Fearing death, Enduring, Adjusting to the circumstances, Being a visitor in an unsafe place, and Acknowledging the staff, all illustrating that the participants were in a state of constant uncertainty and felt abandoned with no guidance or support from the clinicians. The conclusion is that the situation where patients are forced to wait in A&E, i.e., boarding, violates all conditions for professional ethics, presumably causing profound ethical stress in the healthcare professionals involved. Thus, boarding should be avoided. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Innovations in the Emergency Department)
Open AccessArticle
Comparison of Long-Term Effects between Chest Compression-Only CPR Training and Conventional CPR Training on CPR Skills among Police Officers
Healthcare 2021, 9(1), 34; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare9010034 - 02 Jan 2021
Viewed by 328
Abstract
Despite of the changes of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) survival rise when bystander CPR is provided, this was only conducted in about 23% of OHCA patients in Korea in 2018. Police officers acting as first responders have a high chance of witnessing situations [...] Read more.
Despite of the changes of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) survival rise when bystander CPR is provided, this was only conducted in about 23% of OHCA patients in Korea in 2018. Police officers acting as first responders have a high chance of witnessing situations requiring CPR. We investigated long-term effects on CPR quality between chest compression-only CPR training and conventional CPR training in police officers to find an efficient CPR training method in a prospective, randomized, controlled trial. Police officers underwent randomization and received different CPR training. With the Brayden Pro application, we compared the accuracy of CPR skills immediately after training and the one after 3 months. Right after training, the conventional CPR group presented the accuracy of the CPR skills (compression rate: 74.6%, compression depth: 66.0%, recoil: 78.0%, compression position: 96.1%) and chest compression-only CPR group presented the accuracy of the CPR skills (compression rate: 74.5%, compression depth: 71.6%, recoil: 79.2%, compression position: 99.0%). Overall, both groups showed the good quality of CPR skills and had no meaningful difference right after the training. However, three months after training, overall accuracy of CPR skills decreased, a significant difference between two groups was observed for compression position (conventional CPR: 80.0%, chest compression only CPR: 95.0%). In multiple linear regression analysis, three months after CPR training, chest compression-only CPR training made CPR skills accuracy 28.5% higher. In conclusion, police officers showed good-quality CPR right after CPR training in both groups. But three months later, chest compression-only CPR training group had better retention of CPR skills. Therefore, chest compression-only CPR training is better to be a standard training method for police officers as first responders. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Innovations in the Emergency Department)
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