The 10th Anniversary of Healthcare—Family Medicine

A special issue of Healthcare (ISSN 2227-9032). This special issue belongs to the section "Family Medicine".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 December 2023) | Viewed by 5082

Special Issue Editor

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

In 2023, we will celebrate the 10th anniversary volume of the journal Healthcare (ISSN 2227-9032), and we would be thrilled if you could join us on this wonderful occasion.

Healthcare is an international, peer-reviewed, quick-refereeing, open access journal published online by MDPI, Basel, Switzerland. Healthcare is indexed by SCIE, PubMed (NLM), as well as others. The impact factor for this journal is 3.160, and it ranks 50/109 (Q2) in the category “Health Care Sciences & Services”, and 35/88 (Q2) in “Health Policy & Services” in Web of Science. The inaugural issue was released in 2013, and in 2020, we published the 1000th paper in this journal. In 2021, we have achieved our goal of publishing 1200 papers in one year. Healthcare is rapidly developing.

In recognition of this significant milestone, we are launching a Special Issue entitled “The 10th Anniversary of Healthcare—Family Medicine”.

Due to the crucial role played by family medicine in protecting and promoting population health, this Special issue aims to publish scientific evidence regarding the following topics:

  • Primary health care;
  • New challenges in relation to emerging diseases;
  • Vaccination;
  • Screening;
  • Appropriate antimicrobial prescribing;
  • Antimicrobial stewardship;
  • Tackling anti-microbial esistance (AMR);
  • Continuity of care;
  • One health.

This Special Issue will include high-quality papers on topics within the broad scope of Healthcare. It is our pleasure to invite you to contribute an original research paper or a comprehensive review article for peer review and possible publication in Healthcare.

Dr. Marco Dettori
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Healthcare is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2700 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • primary health care
  • new challenges in relation to emerging diseases
  • vaccination
  • screening
  • appropriate antimicrobial prescribing
  • antimicrobial stewardship
  • tackling anti-microbial esistance (AMR)
  • continuity of care
  • one health

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Editorial

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9 pages, 249 KiB  
Editorial
Family Medicine and Primary Healthcare: The Past, Present and Future
by Antonella Arghittu, Paolo Castiglia and Marco Dettori
Healthcare 2023, 11(15), 2128; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare11152128 - 26 Jul 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 990
Abstract
As defined by the World Health Organisation in the conference held in Alma Ata, Kazakhstan, in 1978, “Primary health care is essential health care based on practical, scientifically sound, and socially acceptable methods and technology made universally accessible to individuals and families in [...] Read more.
As defined by the World Health Organisation in the conference held in Alma Ata, Kazakhstan, in 1978, “Primary health care is essential health care based on practical, scientifically sound, and socially acceptable methods and technology made universally accessible to individuals and families in the community through their full participation and at a cost that the community and country can afford to maintain at every stage of their development in the spirit of self-reliance and self-determination” [...] Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The 10th Anniversary of Healthcare—Family Medicine)

Research

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20 pages, 690 KiB  
Article
The Predominance of the Health-Promoting Patterns of Work Behavior and Experience in General Practice Teams—Results of the IMPROVEjob Study
by Beatrice Thielmann, Anke Wagner, Arezoo Bozorgmehr, Esther Rind, Achim Siegel, Melina Hippler, Birgitta Weltermann, Lukas Degen, Julian Göbel, Karen Minder, Tanja Seifried-Dübon, Florian Junne, Anne Herrmann-Werner, Karl-Heinz Jöckel, Verena Schröder, Claudia Pieper, Anna-Lisa Eilerts, Andrea Wittich, Monika A. Rieger and Irina Böckelmann
Healthcare 2024, 12(3), 299; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare12030299 - 24 Jan 2024
Viewed by 755
Abstract
This study aims to identify the distribution of the “Work-related behavior and experience patterns” (Arbeitsbezogenes Verhaltens-und Erlebnismuster, AVEM) in general practitioners and their teams by using baseline data of the IMPROVEjob study. Members of 60 general practices with 84 physicians in a [...] Read more.
This study aims to identify the distribution of the “Work-related behavior and experience patterns” (Arbeitsbezogenes Verhaltens-und Erlebnismuster, AVEM) in general practitioners and their teams by using baseline data of the IMPROVEjob study. Members of 60 general practices with 84 physicians in a leadership position, 28 employed physicians, and 254 practice assistants participated in a survey in 2019 and 2020. In this analysis, we focused on AVEM variables. Age, practice years, work experience, and working time were used as control variables in the Spearman Rho correlations and analysis of variance. The majority of the participants (72.1%) revealed a health-promoting pattern (G or S). Three of eleven AVEM dimensions were above the norm for the professional group “employed physicians”. The AVEM dimensions “striving for perfection” (p < 0.001), “experience of success at work” (p < 0.001), “satisfaction with life” (p = 0.003), and “experience of social support” (p = 0.019) differed significantly between the groups’ practice owners and practice assistants, with the practice owners achieving the higher values, except for experience of social support. Practice affiliation had no effect on almost all AVEM dimensions. We found a high prevalence of AVEM health-promoting patterns in our sample. Nearly half of the participants in all professional groups showed an unambitious pattern (S). Adapted interventions for the represented AVEM patterns are possible and should be utilized for maintaining mental health among general practice teams. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The 10th Anniversary of Healthcare—Family Medicine)
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11 pages, 565 KiB  
Article
Exploring the Link between Family Health and Health Literacy among College Students: The Mediating Role of Psychological Resilience
by Yan-Yan Wang, Xin-Cheng Huang, Jie Yuan and Yi-Bo Wu
Healthcare 2023, 11(13), 1859; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare11131859 - 26 Jun 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1613
Abstract
Enhancing health literacy is of the utmost importance to enhance the physical and mental well-being of college students. Unfortunately, there has been limited research investigating the means of improving college students’ health literacy through the perspective of families. Family health is an interdisciplinary [...] Read more.
Enhancing health literacy is of the utmost importance to enhance the physical and mental well-being of college students. Unfortunately, there has been limited research investigating the means of improving college students’ health literacy through the perspective of families. Family health is an interdisciplinary and complex concept that involves multiple factors, and it provides a holistic perspective on the overall well-being of the family unit. Thus, this study aims to examine the relationship between family health and health literacy and scrutinize the mediating role of psychological resilience. A valid sample of 5473 students was collected from a university in November–December 2022 and was assessed using regression analysis. The findings reveal that family health has a positive association with the health literacy of college students (β = 0.56, p < 0.001), with psychological resilience playing a critical mediating role (β = 0.11, 95% CI: [0.09, 0.13]). Therefore, the family ought to be recognized as a fundamental mechanism to enhance college students’ health literacy. Additionally, it is essential to emphasize the amelioration of psychological distress among college students and enhance their psychological resilience, which will be helpful for their overall health consciousness and proficiency. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The 10th Anniversary of Healthcare—Family Medicine)
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Other

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11 pages, 250 KiB  
Perspective
Revitalizing General Practice: The Critical Role of Medical Schools in Addressing the Primary Care Physician Shortage
by Christian J. Wiedermann
Healthcare 2023, 11(13), 1820; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare11131820 - 21 Jun 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1252
Abstract
The shortage of primary care physicians is a growing crisis that threatens the stability and effectiveness of healthcare systems. This paper explores a multi-pronged approach to addressing this issue by focusing on the modernization of medical curricula, the establishment of new medical schools, [...] Read more.
The shortage of primary care physicians is a growing crisis that threatens the stability and effectiveness of healthcare systems. This paper explores a multi-pronged approach to addressing this issue by focusing on the modernization of medical curricula, the establishment of new medical schools, fostering collaboration between institutions, and implementing policy innovations. The cases of South Tyrol, Italy, and Tyrol, Austria, are examined to highlight the challenges faced in establishing new medical schools. This paper proposes that a comprehensive strategy, including the incorporation of general practice content and experience in medical education, is crucial for preparing future physicians for careers in primary care. Furthermore, intensifying efforts to establish new medical schools, particularly in regions such as South Tyrol, which lack native-language medical university education, can provide additional benefits in addressing regional needs and augmenting the number of graduates. Collaboration between existing and new medical schools, regional partnerships, and policy innovations are essential to support the establishment of institutions with a particular focus on general practice and the modernization of curricula at existing universities. By embracing this approach, stakeholders can collectively shape the medical education landscape and address the growing crisis of physician shortages in primary care. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The 10th Anniversary of Healthcare—Family Medicine)
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