Special Issue "Water Resources Management and Modeling in Forestry"

A special issue of Forests (ISSN 1999-4907). This special issue belongs to the section "Forest Ecology and Management".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 15 April 2020.

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Michael P. Strager
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
School of Natural Resources, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506
Tel. 304-293-6463
Interests: spatial analysis; natural resources; management

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Sustainable management of water and forest resources is critical to quality of life for current and future human communities as well as natural ecosystems. This is especially true in the face of changing land cover, increased pollution, continued fossil fuel consumption, and other resource exploitation. Integration of water resources and forestry at various spatial scales is imperative for future conservation and sustainability. To further explore these and other related issues, we encourage studies from all relevant fields, including experimental studies, monitoring approaches, and models. This Special Issue will highlight emerging work and strategies for the preservation, management, and future development of the water and forest nexus.

Prof. Dr. Michael P. Strager
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Forests is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Watershed modeling
  • Forest management
  • Ecosystem services
  • Forests and water quality
  • Adaptive management
  • Spatial analysis
  • Sediment management from forestry

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Influence of Root Distribution on Preferential Flow in Deciduous and Coniferous Forest Soils
Forests 2019, 10(11), 986; https://doi.org/10.3390/f10110986 - 05 Nov 2019
Abstract
Root-induced channels are the primary controlling factors for rapid movement of water and solute in forest soils. To explore the effects of root distribution on preferential flow during rainfall events, deciduous (Quercus variabilis BI.) and coniferous forest (Platycladus orientalis (L.) Franco) [...] Read more.
Root-induced channels are the primary controlling factors for rapid movement of water and solute in forest soils. To explore the effects of root distribution on preferential flow during rainfall events, deciduous (Quercus variabilis BI.) and coniferous forest (Platycladus orientalis (L.) Franco) sites were selected to conduct dual-tracer experiments (Brilliant Blue FCF and Bromide [Br]). Each plot (1.30 × 1.30 m) was divided into two subplots (0.65 × 1.30 m), and two rainfall simulations (40 mm, large rainfall and 70 mm, extreme rainfall) were conducted in these. Vertical soil profiles (1.00 m × 0.40 m) were excavated, and preferential flow path features were quantified based on digital image analysis. Root (fine and coarse) abundance and Br concentration were investigated for each soil profile. In deciduous forest, accumulated roots in the upper soil layer induce larger lateral preferential flow as compared to the coniferous forest soil during large rainfall events. Compared with deciduous forest, coniferous forest soil, with higher (horizontal and vertical) spatial variability of preferential flow paths, promotes higher percolation and solute leaching to deeper soil layers during extreme rainfall events. Fine roots, accounting for a larger proportion of total roots (compared to coarse roots), facilitate preferential flow in the 0–40 cm forest soil layer. Overall, our results indicate that the root distribution pattern of different tree species can exert diverse effects on preferential flow in forest soils. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Water Resources Management and Modeling in Forestry)
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Open AccessArticle
Will Human-Induced Vegetation Regreening Continually Decrease Runoff in the Loess Plateau of China?
Forests 2019, 10(10), 906; https://doi.org/10.3390/f10100906 - 15 Oct 2019
Abstract
China has become the largest contributing country to global vegetation regreening. However, the regreening pattern and subsequent impact on arid areas have not been comprehensively evaluated. Therefore, we selected the Loess Plateau, a representative arid region that has undergone evident vegetation restoration, to [...] Read more.
China has become the largest contributing country to global vegetation regreening. However, the regreening pattern and subsequent impact on arid areas have not been comprehensively evaluated. Therefore, we selected the Loess Plateau, a representative arid region that has undergone evident vegetation restoration, to investigate the spatial patterns and temporal trends, as well as the drivers of vegetation change. This study primarily focused on 12 afforested watersheds during 2000–2018. Furthermore, both the impacts of vegetation regreening on runoff for the past two decades and the future projections were quantified based on the fraction of photosynthetically active radiation (fPAR), the Budyko model, and the global climate models (GCMs). fPAR for the last two decades indicates that vegetation in the Loess Plateau has experienced a continuous increasing trend during the growing season, primarily in response to the implementation of the Grain for Green Project (GFGP). Of the 12 watersheds, 9 experienced significant fPAR change with a change rate above 50%, and 11 exhibited a significant increase (p < 0.05) in runoff sensitivity to vegetation regreening, which indicates that vegetation regreening plays an increasingly important role in controlling runoff variation. The decline in runoff caused by vegetation regreening was particularly noticeable before 2011 or 2012; afterwards, runoff tended to vary with precipitation. In the future (2020–2049 and 2050–2099), decrease in runoff by regreening will be limited, as runoff is anticipated to decrease by 3.5% in 2020–2049 and 4.1% in 2050–2099 with a 20% increase in fPAR. These results indicate that runoff tends to be stable even with continuous vegetation regreening. While the reduction of runoff by regreening will be limited in the future, rapid human-induced vegetation regreening may aggravate water scarcity when flash droughts occur and may result in disasters in water-limited regions to the socio-economic stability and agriculture. Our study will provide an applicable theoretical foundation for water resources decision-making and ecological restoration. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Water Resources Management and Modeling in Forestry)
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