Special Issue "Abiotic and Biotic Stress in Forest and Plantation Trees"

A special issue of Forests (ISSN 1999-4907). This special issue belongs to the section "Forest Ecology and Management".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 10 September 2020.

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Bernard Dell
Website
Guest Editor
Murdoch University, Perth, WA 6150, Australia
Interests: Silviculture; Diagnosis and correction of nutrient disorders; Beneficial bacteria and mycorrhizal fungi; Edible and medicinal forest mushrooms; Forest protection (pest and disease); Climate change and tree health; Edible forest fungi; Reforestation; Valuable trees; Urban forests; Invasive species.

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The incidence of abiotic and biotic stress in trees is increasing globally, leading to escalating concerns for forest protection, biodiversity, the provision of ecosystem services, biosecurity, economic production, and rural livelihoods. Tree declines are now present in most geographical regions in the world, extending from cold temperate to tropical forests. The objective of this Special Issue of Forests is to explore, using review articles and original research papers, the major abiotic and biotic stressors that have caused or incited significant tree decline and mortality in natural and planted forests over the past decade. It will also explore the recent drivers of change, global threats, risk management, and related topics.

Prof. Bernard Dell
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Forests is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • tree decline
  • climate change
  • pests and disease
  • forest management
  • biosecurity

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Temporal Progress of Candeia Rust Caused by Puccinia velata in Clonal Candeia Plantation (Eremanthus erythropappus (DC.) McLeisch)
Forests 2020, 11(7), 720; https://doi.org/10.3390/f11070720 - 29 Jun 2020
Abstract
The temporal progress of candeia rust, caused by the fungus Puccinia velata, was monitored in an experimental field at Lavras municipality, Southern Minas Gerais state, Brazil. A plantation with 17 Eremanthus erythropappus clones was set at the site, and the temporal disease [...] Read more.
The temporal progress of candeia rust, caused by the fungus Puccinia velata, was monitored in an experimental field at Lavras municipality, Southern Minas Gerais state, Brazil. A plantation with 17 Eremanthus erythropappus clones was set at the site, and the temporal disease progress was analyzed based on visual assessments of disease severity on leaves. The disease was monitored monthly between September 2016 and August 2017. Progress curves based on disease severity were constructed and empirical models were fitted. The area under the disease progress curve (AUDPC) was calculated, and the means test was applied to select clones resistant to the disease. The Pearson coefficient was used to assess correlations between disease severity and environmental variables. The model that best described disease progress over the assessment period was the Gompertz model. The mean AUDPC values were grouped into four groups of resistance levels according to the Scott–Knott test. There was a negative correlation between air temperature and disease severity. Considering that the disease occurred in all clones and that the climatic conditions of Southern Minas Gerais are favorable to the candeia rust, it is important to adopt measures for the selection of clones resistant to this disease. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Abiotic and Biotic Stress in Forest and Plantation Trees)
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Open AccessArticle
Differential Metabolite Accumulation in Different Tissues of Gleditsia sinensis under Water Stress and Rehydration Conditions
Forests 2020, 11(5), 542; https://doi.org/10.3390/f11050542 - 12 May 2020
Abstract
Gleditsia sinensis Lam. is a woody species that can tolerate various drought conditions and has been widely used in all aspects of life, including medicine, food, cleaning products, and landscaping. However, few reports have focused on the regulatory mechanism of the drought response [...] Read more.
Gleditsia sinensis Lam. is a woody species that can tolerate various drought conditions and has been widely used in all aspects of life, including medicine, food, cleaning products, and landscaping. However, few reports have focused on the regulatory mechanism of the drought response in G. sinensis. To understand the metabolic basis of the Gleditsia sinensis drought response, different tissues were subjected to a rehydration/dehydration treatment and subsequently analyzed using untargeted and targeted metabolomics profiling depending on gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and liquid chromatography-tandem mass (LC-MS) analytical platforms, respectively. Eight sugars, twelve amino acids, and twenty phenolic compounds were characterized. Metabolites showing a significant increase or decrease under drought stress were considered to be the key metabolites of interest for a better understanding of the drought tolerance mechanisms. The GC-MS-identified compounds were shown to undergo tissue-specific regulation in response to drought stress. Moreover, the C6C3C6 and C6C3 structures were identified by LC-MS as phenolic metabolites, which revealed their drought-response association. Significant physiological parameters were measured, including overall plant development, and the results showed that antioxidant systems could not be completely restored, but photosynthetic parameters could be recovered. The results of this research provide insight into biochemical component information mechanism of drought resistance in G. sinensis. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Abiotic and Biotic Stress in Forest and Plantation Trees)
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