Intensification of the Prebiotic Production Process

A special issue of Foods (ISSN 2304-8158). This special issue belongs to the section "Food Microbiology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (20 May 2022) | Viewed by 7595

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Centre of Biological Engineering, University of Minho, Braga, Portugal
Interests: prebiotics; fructo-oligosaccharides; gastrointestinal models; in vitro digestion; host-microbiota interaction; functional food; fermentative processes
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Guest Editor
Department of Biological Engineering, School of Engineering, University of Minho, 4704-553 Braga, Portugal
Interests: industrial and food biotechnology; fermentation processes; food processing; agro-industry by-products valorization; prebiotics production
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Guest Editor
Group of Bioprocesses and Bioproducts, Food Research Department, School of Chemistry, Universidad Autónoma de Coahuila, Saltillo, Mexico
Interests: fermentation technology; phenolic antioxidants; tannases; fungal cultures; biocontrol; edible coatings and films
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The daily consumption of prebiotics has been associated with the prevention and treatment of many diseases related to the gastrointestinal tract, mental health, bone and cardiometabolism. Prebiotics are defined as "a substrate that is selectively utilized by host microorganisms conferring a health benefit". Recognized prebiotics remain mostly limited to nondigestible oligosaccharides, such as fructo-oligosaccharides, inulin, galacto-oligosaccharides and lactulose, although other noncarbohydrates, such as polyphenols, appear as potential prebiotics. Other emergent candidates are isomalto-oligosaccharides, xylo-oligosaccharides, malto-oligosaccharides, among others. Prebiotics are mainly produced by direct extraction from plants, hydrolysed by natural polysaccharides and enzymatic synthesis.

With the increasing demand by functional food and the emergence of such a wide range of new prebiotic candidates, it is now of huge interest to develop successful bioprocesses for their production at high content, high purity, and at industrial scale. This Special Issue aims to gather original research articles and reviews, on topics related with:

  • New bioprocesses for prebiotics production at high content;
  • New approaches to increase purity of produced prebiotics;
  • Prebiotics production from agro-industrial wastes;
  • Engineered enzymes to produce prebiotics;
  • Prebiotics production at industrial scale;
  • Novel microorganisms able to produce prebiotics;
  • Synthesis of novel prebiotics. 

Dr. Clarisse Salomé Nobre Gonçalves
Prof. Dr. José António Teixeira
Prof. Dr. Cristóbal Noé Aguilar González
Guest Editors

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Keywords

  • prebiotics
  • fermentation
  • engineered enzymes
  • bioprocesses
  • microbial prebiotics
  • functional food

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

15 pages, 2299 KiB  
Article
Successive Fermentation of Aguamiel and Molasses by Aspergillus oryzae and Saccharomyces cerevisiae to Obtain High Purity Fructooligosaccharides
by Orlando de la Rosa, Adriana Carolina Flores-Gallegos, Diana Muñíz-Márquez, Juan C. Contreras-Esquivel, José A. Teixeira, Clarisse Nobre and Cristóbal N. Aguilar
Foods 2022, 11(12), 1786; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods11121786 - 17 Jun 2022
Cited by 7 | Viewed by 2423
Abstract
Fructooligosaccharides (FOS) are usually synthesized with pure enzymes using highly concentrated sucrose solutions. In this work, low-cost aguamiel and molasses were explored as sucrose alternatives to produce FOS, via whole-cell fermentation, with an Aspergillus oryzae DIA-MF strain. FOS production process was optimized through [...] Read more.
Fructooligosaccharides (FOS) are usually synthesized with pure enzymes using highly concentrated sucrose solutions. In this work, low-cost aguamiel and molasses were explored as sucrose alternatives to produce FOS, via whole-cell fermentation, with an Aspergillus oryzae DIA-MF strain. FOS production process was optimized through a central composite experimental design, with two independent variables: initial sucrose concentration in a medium composed of aguamiel and molasses (AgMe), and inoculum concentration. The optimized process—165 g/L initial sucrose in AgMe (adjusted with concentrated molasses) and 1 × 107 spores/mL inoculum concentration—resulted in an FOS production of 119 ± 12 g/L and a yield of 0.64 ± 0.05 g FOS/g GFi. Among the FOSs produced were kestose, nystose, 1-fructofuranosyl-nystose, and potentially a novel trisaccharide produced by this strain. To reduce the content of mono- and disaccharides in the mixture, run a successive fermentation was run with two Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains. Fermentations run with S. cerevisiae S227 improved FOS purity in the mixture from 39 ± 3% to 61.0 ± 0.6% (w/w) after 16 h of fermentation. This study showed that agro-industrial wastes such as molasses with aguamiel are excellent alternatives as substrate sources for the production of prebiotic FOS, resulting in a lower-cost process. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Intensification of the Prebiotic Production Process)
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18 pages, 1876 KiB  
Article
Evaluation of Microbial-Fructo-Oligosaccharides Metabolism by Human Gut Microbiota Fermentation as Compared to Commercial Inulin-Derived Oligosaccharides
by Dalila Roupar, Marta C. Coelho, Daniela A. Gonçalves, Soraia P. Silva, Elisabete Coelho, Sara Silva, Manuel A. Coimbra, Manuela Pintado, José A. Teixeira and Clarisse Nobre
Foods 2022, 11(7), 954; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods11070954 - 25 Mar 2022
Cited by 16 | Viewed by 3883
Abstract
The prebiotic potential of fructo-oligosaccharides (microbial-FOS) produced by a newly isolated Aspergillus ibericus, and purified by Saccharomyces cerevisiae YIL162 W, was evaluated. Their chemical structure and functionality were compared to a non-microbial commercial FOS sample. Prebiotics were fermented in vitro by fecal [...] Read more.
The prebiotic potential of fructo-oligosaccharides (microbial-FOS) produced by a newly isolated Aspergillus ibericus, and purified by Saccharomyces cerevisiae YIL162 W, was evaluated. Their chemical structure and functionality were compared to a non-microbial commercial FOS sample. Prebiotics were fermented in vitro by fecal microbiota of five healthy volunteers. Microbial-FOS significantly stimulated the growth of Bifidobacterium probiotic strains, triggering a beneficial effect on gut microbiota composition. A higher amount of total short-chain fatty acids (SCFA) was produced by microbial-FOS fermentation as compared to commercial-FOS, particularly propionate and butyrate. Inulin neoseries oligosaccharides, with a degree of polymerization (DP) up to 5 (e.g., neokestose and neonystose), were identified only in the microbial-FOS mixture. More than 10% of the microbial-oligosaccharides showed a DP higher than 5. Differences identified in the structures of the FOS samples may explain their different functionalities. Results indicate that microbial-FOS exhibit promising potential as nutraceutical ingredients for positive gut microbiota modulation. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Intensification of the Prebiotic Production Process)
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