Special Issue "Food-Evoked Emotion, Product Acceptance, Food Preference, Food Choice and Consumption: The New Perspective on Developing Novel and Healthier Products"

A special issue of Foods (ISSN 2304-8158). This special issue belongs to the section "Sensory and Consumer Sciences".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 20 October 2022.

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Witoon Prinyawiwatkul
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
School of Nutrition and Food Sciences, Louisiana State University Agricultural Center, Baton Rouge, LA 70803, USA
Interests: sensory sciences; consumer research; product development; healthier foods
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Eating is a necessity to survive. However, food is more than just a source of nutrients—it is a source of basic pleasure as well as aesthetic experiences. Eating and drinking and lifestyle can promote health or may cause a number of potential health risk and ethical concerns related to food chain and production. Today, consumers are more health-conscious and more educated about what goes into their foods. Many consumers want healthier versions of retailed food products, such as those with low-sodium content. These consumers are concerned about their health benefit or risk associated with food consumption. At present, globalization allows consumers to be exposed to various cuisines which can be readily available to them. Additionally, with the world population increasing rapidly, alternative food sources and food production will be needed to support sustainability. A potential alternative protein source (e.g., from edible insect protein), for instance, will likely be needed. The question, therefore, is: “Would consumers be willing to consume this, and would they like it?” Based on many studies, food choice, acceptance, preference, and consumption are affected by a large number of factors, including both intrinsic and extrinsic factors and cues.

It is known that food elicits emotion. Measuring food-evoked emotions is a topical topic in sensory and consumer sciences. Emotions are becoming a critical component in designing products that meet consumers’ needs and expectations. Emotional profiles may effectively differentiate products with similar sensory characteristics and hedonic ratings. Emotion profiles and ratings may provide additional information that goes beyond traditional hedonic ratings and may provide more insight toward food choice. Several studies have reported emotional responses to food and their relationships to product acceptability. In addition to sensory quality of food, food-evoked emotion has been reported to be critical in predicting consumer's food preference, acceptance, and food choice, which are, in turn, critical in developing novel products. Appropriate health benefit information has also been reported to impact emotion, purchase decisions, and food choices. Human senses and cues play an instrumental role in food choice and intake, emotion, and product acceptance; hence, understanding their roles and importance is critical.

This Special Issue of Foods aims to publish both original and cutting-edge research and comprehensive reviews contributing to a deeper understanding of food-evoked emotion, food choice, preference, acceptance, and consumption, which is a valuable source of information for research and development, product innovation, and marketing that goes beyond traditional sensory preference and acceptability measurement. Papers from multi- and interdisciplinary perspectives, such as food and sensory sciences, culinology and gastronomy, nutrition and health sciences, psychology, business and marketing, and consumer behavior are highly desirable and very welcome.

Prof. Dr. Witoon Prinyawiwatkul
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Foods is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2200 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • food-evoked emotions
  • sensory liking and consumer acceptance
  • food preference
  • willingness to try
  • purchase intent
  • food choice
  • food intake
  • health risk and benefit statement

Published Papers (7 papers)

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Research

Article
Sensory Drivers of Consumer Acceptance, Purchase Intent and Emotions toward Brewed Black Coffee
Foods 2022, 11(2), 180; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods11020180 - 11 Jan 2022
Viewed by 241
Abstract
The link between coffee aroma/flavor and elicited emotions remains underexplored. This research identified key sensory characteristics of brewed black coffee that affected acceptance, purchase intent and emotions for Thai consumers. Eight Arabica coffee samples were evaluated by eight trained descriptive panelists for intensities [...] Read more.
The link between coffee aroma/flavor and elicited emotions remains underexplored. This research identified key sensory characteristics of brewed black coffee that affected acceptance, purchase intent and emotions for Thai consumers. Eight Arabica coffee samples were evaluated by eight trained descriptive panelists for intensities of 26 sensory attributes and by 100 brewed black coffee users for acceptance, purchase intent and emotions. Results showed that the samples exhibited a wide range of sensory characteristics, and large differences were mainly described by the attributes coffee identity (coffee ID), roasted, bitter taste, balance/blended and fullness. Differences also existed among the samples for overall liking, purchase intent and most emotion terms. Partial least square regression analysis revealed that liking, purchase intent and positive emotions, such as active, alert, awake, energetic, enthusiastic, feel good, happy, jump start, impressed, pleased, refreshed and vigorous were driven by coffee ID, roasted, ashy, pipe tobacco, bitter taste, rubber, overall sweet, balanced/blended, fullness and longevity. Contrarily, sour aromatic, sour taste, fruity, woody, musty/earthy, musty/dusty and molasses decreased liking, purchase intent and positive emotions, and stimulated negative emotions, such as disappointed, grouchy and unfulfilled. This information could be useful for creating or modifying the sensory profile of brewed black coffee to increase consumer acceptance. Full article
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Article
Sensory Features Introduced by Brewery Spent Grain with Impact on Consumers’ Motivations and Emotions for Fibre-Enriched Products
Foods 2022, 11(1), 36; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods11010036 - 24 Dec 2021
Viewed by 345
Abstract
The aim of this work was both to formulate three different fibre-enriched products by the addition of Brewery Spent Grain (BSG), and to evaluate the impact of this fibre enrichment on sensory quality, acceptability, and purchase intention under blind conditions. BSG was incorporated [...] Read more.
The aim of this work was both to formulate three different fibre-enriched products by the addition of Brewery Spent Grain (BSG), and to evaluate the impact of this fibre enrichment on sensory quality, acceptability, and purchase intention under blind conditions. BSG was incorporated into bread, pasta, and chocolate milk at levels of 8.3%, 2.8%, and 0.35% (w/w), respectively. The fibre-enriched products and their regular counterparts were evaluated together by consumers through a CATA questionnaire, the EsSense 25 Profile, an overall acceptability rating, and a purchase intention ranking. Although fibre-enriched bread and chocolate milk ranked lower in overall acceptability compared with their counterparts, no significant difference was found for fibre-enriched pasta (p > 0.05). Purchase intention did not differ significantly for both bread and pasta (p > 0.05), yet the reasons for purchasing them differed significantly (p < 0.05). Consumers recognised the fibre enrichment in these two products and, therefore, were willing to partially compromise on sensory attributes. The fibre-enriched chocolate milk, nonetheless, scored significantly (p < 0.05) lower in purchase intention than the control. This work demonstrates that the effect of BSG addition is product-specific, and that fibre perception makes consumers feel more confident. Full article
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Article
Emoji for Food and Beverage Research: Pleasure, Arousal and Dominance Meanings and Appropriateness for Use
Foods 2021, 10(11), 2880; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods10112880 - 22 Nov 2021
Viewed by 606
Abstract
Emoji have been argued to have considerable potential for emotion research but are struggling with uptake in part because knowledge about their meaning is lacking. The present research included 24 emoji (14 facial, 10 non-facial) which were characterized using the PAD model (Pleasure-Arousal-Dominance) [...] Read more.
Emoji have been argued to have considerable potential for emotion research but are struggling with uptake in part because knowledge about their meaning is lacking. The present research included 24 emoji (14 facial, 10 non-facial) which were characterized using the PAD model (Pleasure-Arousal-Dominance) of human affect by 165 consumers in New Zealand and 861 consumers in the UK. The results from the two countries were remarkably similar and contributed further evidence that emoji are suitable for cross-cultural research. While significant differences between the emoji were established for each of the PAD dimensions, the mean scores differed most on the Pleasure dimension (positive to negative), then on the Arousal dimension (activated to deactivated), and lastly on the Dominance dimension (dominance to submissive). The research also directly measured the perceived appropriateness of the 24 emoji for use with foods and beverages. The emoji face savoring food, clapping hands and party popper were in the top-5 for the highest appropriateness in food and beverage context for both studies, as was a strong negative expression linked to rejection (Study 1: face vomiting; Study 2: nauseated face). On the other hand, zzz and oncoming fist were considered as the least appropriate to be used in a food and beverage context in both studies. Again, the results from the UK and NZ were in good agreement and identified similar groups of emoji as most and least suitable for food-related consumer research. Full article
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Article
Understanding the Key Factors of Older Adults’ Continuance Intention in Congregate Meal Halls
Foods 2021, 10(11), 2638; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods10112638 - 30 Oct 2021
Viewed by 461
Abstract
Eating congregate/community meals with friends promotes a balanced and healthy diet among older adults. It is helpful for postponing aging, preventing chronic diseases, and improving their quality of life. However, little research has examined the continuance intention for older adults with the congregate [...] Read more.
Eating congregate/community meals with friends promotes a balanced and healthy diet among older adults. It is helpful for postponing aging, preventing chronic diseases, and improving their quality of life. However, little research has examined the continuance intention for older adults with the congregate meal program in Taiwan. This study established a model for key factors of older adults’ continuance intention dining at senior meal halls, and hypotheses to explain them, and subsequently designed questionnaires and scales. By analyzing the longitudinal data collected from 416 individuals using survey questionnaires, we found that the perceived service quality is the main factor that affects the perceived satisfaction, and the perceived satisfaction of the older adults plays an important role in this survey. It showed that if the older adults are satisfied with the service quality provided by the senior meal halls, which will accordingly affect the post-use trust, they will show a positive continuance intention to participate in the senior meal halls. We also found that the older adults have positive views on the planning and service contents of the existing senior meal halls. Together, these results illustrate the process and provide comprehensive insights and evidence to create a better user experience and improve the satisfaction of the congregate meal for older adults. Full article
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Article
Exploring Text Mining for Recent Consumer and Sensory Studies about Alternative Proteins
Foods 2021, 10(11), 2537; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods10112537 - 21 Oct 2021
Viewed by 810
Abstract
Increased meat consumption has been associated with the overuse of fresh water, underground water contamination, land degradation, and negative animal welfare. To mitigate these problems, replacing animal meat products with alternatives such as plant-, insect-, algae-, or yeast-fermented-based proteins, and/or cultured meat, is [...] Read more.
Increased meat consumption has been associated with the overuse of fresh water, underground water contamination, land degradation, and negative animal welfare. To mitigate these problems, replacing animal meat products with alternatives such as plant-, insect-, algae-, or yeast-fermented-based proteins, and/or cultured meat, is a viable strategy. Nowadays, there is a vast amount of information regarding consumers’ perceptions of alternative proteins in scientific outlets. Sorting and arranging this information can be time-consuming. To overcome this drawback, text mining and Natural Language Processing (NLP) are introduced as novel approaches to obtain sensory data and rapidly identify current consumer trends. In this study, the application of text mining and NLP in gathering information about alternative proteins was explored by analyzing key descriptive words and sentiments from n = 20 academic papers. From 2018 to 2021, insect- and plant-based proteins were the centers of alternative proteins research as these were the most popular topics in current studies. Pea has become the most common source for plant-based protein applications, while spirulina is the most popular algae-based protein. The emotional profile analysis showed that there was no significant association between emotions and protein categories. Our work showed that applying text mining and NLP could be useful to identify research trends in recent sensory studies. This technique can rapidly obtain and analyze a large amount of data, thus overcoming the time-consuming drawback of traditional sensory techniques. Full article
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Article
Studying the Emotional Response to Insects Food Products
Foods 2021, 10(10), 2404; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods10102404 - 11 Oct 2021
Viewed by 437
Abstract
Insects have been proposed as a sustainable food solution due to their environmental, nutritional, and socioeconomic value; however, in the western world, insects are viewed as disgusting. This research aimed to understand the acceptance of insect-based products in the US market by studying [...] Read more.
Insects have been proposed as a sustainable food solution due to their environmental, nutritional, and socioeconomic value; however, in the western world, insects are viewed as disgusting. This research aimed to understand the acceptance of insect-based products in the US market by studying the emotional response to such. A survey of 826 consumers was conducted using (1) a modified version of the EsSense Profile® questionnaire to capture the emotional response to pictures of different kinds of foods, (2) images to evaluate the influence of the presence or absence of non-visible insects in food products, (3) information about the environmental value of insects, and (4) socioeconomic demographics. Disgust was found as a barrier to product acceptance. Insect food products were positively correlated with the emotions of interest, understanding, daring, adventurous, and worried, and negatively correlated with the emotions satisfied, good, pleasant, happy, calm, warm, nostalgic, and secure. The influence of sustainability-related information on the emotional response to such products is complex and should be carefully considered. Full article
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Article
Effect of Disclosed Information on Product Liking, Emotional Profile, and Purchase Intent: A Case of Chocolate Brownies Containing Edible-Cricket Protein
Foods 2021, 10(8), 1769; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods10081769 - 30 Jul 2021
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 1121
Abstract
Edible insects, a sustainable and nutritious alternative to conventionally derived proteins, are unfamiliar to Westerners and often associated with negative sentiments. Edible-cricket protein (ECP) added to chocolate brownies (CB) [0% ECP = CBWO (without) vs. 6% w/w ECP = CBW (with)], and disclosed [...] Read more.
Edible insects, a sustainable and nutritious alternative to conventionally derived proteins, are unfamiliar to Westerners and often associated with negative sentiments. Edible-cricket protein (ECP) added to chocolate brownies (CB) [0% ECP = CBWO (without) vs. 6% w/w ECP = CBW (with)], and disclosed information [no ECP added = (−) vs. ECP with benefits = (+), ECP− and ECP+, respectively] yielded four CB treatments (CBWO−, CBWO+, CBW−, and CBW+). Subjects (n = 112 female and n = 98 male) rated liking, selected emotions before- and after-tasting, and determined consumption (CI) and purchase intent (PI) after tasting. Likings were analyzed with mixed-effects ANOVA and post hoc Tukey’s HSD test. Emotions were evaluated with Cochran’s-Q test and correspondence analysis. Emotions driving or inhibiting overall liking (OL) were assessed with penalty-lift analyses using two-sample t-tests. A random forest algorithm was used to predict PI and estimate variables’ importance. Female’s and male’s expected OL were higher for CBWO− than for CBWO+. Females’ actual OL was higher for CBWO than for CBW regardless of the disclosed information but males’ actual OL was the same across treatments. Females exhibited negative-liking disconfirmation for CBW−. In both tasting conditions, the disclosed information affected treatments’ emotional profiles more than formulation. After-tasting emotions “happy” and “satisfied” were critical predictors of PI. Full article
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