Special Issue "Analysis of Contaminants in Food Matrices: From Fruit Juice to Vegetable Oil"

A special issue of Foods (ISSN 2304-8158). This special issue belongs to the section "Food Quality and Safety".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (15 August 2023) | Viewed by 2219

Special Issue Editors

Department of Characterization and Quality of Lipids, Instituto de la Grasa (CSIC), Sevilla, Spain
Interests: 3MCPD; chloropropanols; contaminants; glycidol; lipidic matrix; MOSH-MOAH; olive oil fraud detection; olive oil quality
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Department of Characterization and Quality of Lipids, Instituto de la Grasa (CSIC), Sevilla, Spain
Interests: authenticity; method development; olive oil; quality; residues and contaminants
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Department of Characterization and Quality of Lipids, Instituto de la Grasa (CSIC), Sevilla, Spain
Interests: alternative oil sources; analytical procedures; edible fats and oils; microencapsulation processes; oil components; oil regulations
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

We live in a contaminated world. Residues and pollutants are well-documented threads to the food sector, with food contamination being a growing concern in an ever more industrialized world. As consumers, we are permanently exposed to a range of contaminants whose major sources are foods, food packing, food-, pharmaceutical-, and daily care-additives, processing aids, lubricants, and exhaust gases.

When focusing on food matrices, the presence of contaminants may be both accidental and intentional. In any case, their levels must be kept under certain toxicologically relevant limits in order to protect public health. When possible, maximum thresholds are set in a way that they are reasonably achievable when respecting good agricultural, fishery, and manufacturing practices, taking into account the risk related to the consumption of specific food groups, and including special measurements for the health protection of infants, toddlers, and vulnerable groups.

Nowadays, considering the potential human health impact, a wide range of contaminants in foodstuffs must be monitored. Among those compounds the following groups are of paramount importance: 3-monochloropropanediol (3-MCPD), 3-MCPD fatty acid esters and glycidyl fatty acid esters, dioxins, inherent plant toxins, melamine and its analogues, metals, mineral oil saturated/aromatic hydrocarbons (MOSH/MOAH), mycotoxins, nitrate, perchlorate, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH).

The foodstuffs under surveillance include a wide range of edible matrices, such as animal fats, baby foods, bread and rolls, berries and small fruits, cereals and cereal products, confectionery (including chocolate), coffee beans and coffee derivatives, crustaceans, dietary foods for special medical purposes,  dried fruit, fruit juice, fish meat, fish products, grains for human consumption, ices and desserts, meat, molluscs, oilseeds, pasta, raw milk, sausages, spices, tree nuts and groundnuts, vegetables, vegetable oil, wine, etc.

Seeing the wide variety and forms of food matrices, it is clear that food safety control approaches face numerous scientific and operational challenges, starting with the sample preparative phase in which the degree of complexity and the presence of interferences is highly dependent on the sample’s nature, and following with the analysis itself, which must comply with a series of requirement, such as specificity, limits of detection/quantification, recovery, repeatability and the rest of the parameters described in official or validated methods.

Finally, it has become clear that the development of on-line/hyphenated methods of analysis of residues and contaminants in complex matrices is a real trend that however started years ago. Let us see how each of us overcomes her/his own analytical challenge either from the point of view of a novel sample (pre)-treatment, of an innovative analytical instrument design, or of an easy to use software.

Dr. Raquel B. Gómez-Coca
Dr. Wenceslao Moreda
Dr. M. Carmen Pérez-Camino
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Foods is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2900 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Published Papers (1 paper)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Article
The Mineral Oil Hydrocarbon Paradox in Olive Pomace Oils
Foods 2023, 12(3), 434; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods12030434 - 17 Jan 2023
Viewed by 1739
Abstract
The aim of this work was to understand the actual content of mineral oil hydrocarbons (MOH) in olive pomace oil in order to contribute to the monitoring requested by EFSA for the food groups making a relevant impact on human background exposure. Such [...] Read more.
The aim of this work was to understand the actual content of mineral oil hydrocarbons (MOH) in olive pomace oil in order to contribute to the monitoring requested by EFSA for the food groups making a relevant impact on human background exposure. Such information will complement both the information inferred from the limits established by the EU and the interpretation of the coming toxicological risk assessment. At the same time, the origin of such a group of compounds is discussed. From the raw material to the commercial product, olive pomace oils were sampled and analyzed at different points and/or conditions. Through the ultimate online HPLC-GC-FID system, we gathered information on the MOH concentrations and molecular mass profiles (C-fractions), and through GCxGC-TOF/MS, we identified the key structures that prove the innocuousness of the mineral oil aromatic hydrocarbon (MOAH) fraction. Our approaches provided chromatographic signals on the C10-C50 range, rendering 33–205 mg/kg mineral oil saturated hydrocarbon (MOSH) and 2–55 mg/kg MOAH in the commercial product. The results confirmed that the C25-C35 cut is the main fraction to which humans are exposed via olive pomace oil, showing concentrations highly dependent on the extraction process. Moreover, the identification of the main MOAH groups showed that in olive pomace oil, mainly 1- and 2-ring species were present, being virtually free of the carcinogenic 3–7 ring aromatics. Full article
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

Back to TopTop