Special Issue "Electrothermal Modeling of Solar Cells and Modules"

A special issue of Energies (ISSN 1996-1073). This special issue belongs to the section "Solar Energy and Photovoltaic Systems".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 29 July 2021.

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Vincenzo d'Alessandro
Website
Guest Editor
Department of Electrical Engineering and Information Technology, University Federico II, via Claudio 21, 80125 Naples, Italy
Interests: bipolar transistors; power devices; photovoltaics; microelectronics; semiconductor devices
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Prof. Dr. Pierluigi Guerriero
Website
Guest Editor
Department of Electrical and Information Technologies, University of Naples Federico II Via Claudio 21, Napoli (NA), Italy
Interests: inverters; measurement; nanoelectronics; optoelectronics; photovoltaics; power electronics; semiconductor device physics; thin film deposition
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The Guest Editors are inviting submissions for a Special Issue of Energies on the subject area of “Electrothermal Modeling of Solar Cells and Modules”.

Solar modules are subject to considerable time variation of the temperature depending upon season, hour of the day, presence of clouds, wind speed, and nonuniform temperature distributions dictated by dirt, partial architectural shading, malfunctioning events, which in severe cases might also turn into hot-spots. High temperatures affect power production, while hot-spots are likely to entail reliability reduction (i.e., early aging) and even irreversible failures. It is therefore clear that an accurate electrothermal modeling of the solar module can be of paramount importance for the photovoltaic community, since it can (i) help to provide an in-depth understanding of the temperature influence on the behavior of the individual cells and the entire module and (ii) support the interpretation of IR maps (e.g., taken by low-flying drones), both aspects being poorly covered by the literature.

Papers suited to this Special Issue should be focused on:

  • analysis of the 3-D heat propagation within the cell and/or the module;
  • description and interpretation of the electrothermal (i.e., power-temperature) feedback;
  • impact on the temperature field of position (latitude and longitude), tilt angle, day, hour of the day, and boundary conditions (including both radiative and convective mechanisms);
  • efficient approaches to deal with the thermal and the electrical problems, as well as with the coupling between them;
  • techniques relying on a calibrated electrothermal model for the interpretation of experimental temperature maps.

Prof. Dr. Vincenzo d'Alessandro
Prof. Dr. Pierluigi Guerriero
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Energies is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • electrothermal modeling
  • experimental temperature detection
  • heat propagation
  • solar cells
  • solar modules
  • temperature maps

Published Papers (3 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Jump to: Review

Open AccessArticle
Dynamic Electro-Thermal PV Temperature and Power Output Prediction Model for Any PV Geometries in Free-Standing and BIPV Systems Operating under Any Environmental Conditions
Energies 2020, 13(18), 4743; https://doi.org/10.3390/en13184743 - 11 Sep 2020
Abstract
PV temperature significantly affects the module’s power output and final system yield, and its accurate prediction can serve the forecasting of PV power output, smart grid operations, online PV diagnostics and dynamic predictive management of Building Integrated Photovoltaic (BIPV) systems. This paper presents [...] Read more.
PV temperature significantly affects the module’s power output and final system yield, and its accurate prediction can serve the forecasting of PV power output, smart grid operations, online PV diagnostics and dynamic predictive management of Building Integrated Photovoltaic (BIPV) systems. This paper presents a dynamic PV temperature prediction model based on transient Energy Balance Equations, incorporating theoretical expressions for all heat transfer processes, natural convection, forced convection, conduction and radiation exchanges between both module sides and the environment. The algorithmic approach predicts PV temperature at the centre of the cell, the back and the front glass cover with fast convergence and serves the PV power output prediction. The simulation model is robust, predicting PV temperature with high accuracy at any environmental conditions, PV inclination, orientation, wind speed and direction, and mounting configurations, free-standing and BIPV. These, alongside its theoretical basis, ensure the model’s wide applicability and clear advantage over existing PV temperature prediction models. The model is validated for a wide range of environmental conditions, PV geometries and mounting configurations with experimental data from a sun-tracking, a fixed angle PV and a BIPV system. The deviation between predicted and measured power output for the fixed-angle and the sun-tracking PV systems was estimated at −1.4% and 1.9%, respectively. The median of the temperature difference between predicted and measured values was as low as 0.5 °C for the sun-tracking system, and for all cases, the predicted temperature profiles were closely matching the measured profiles. The PV temperature and power output predicted by this model are compared to the results produced by other well-known PV temperature models, illustrating its high predictive capacity, accuracy and robustness. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Electrothermal Modeling of Solar Cells and Modules)
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

Open AccessArticle
Temperature-Dependent Analysis of Solid-State Photon-Enhanced Thermionic Emission Solar Energy Converter
Energies 2020, 13(7), 1554; https://doi.org/10.3390/en13071554 - 27 Mar 2020
Abstract
Solid-state photon-enhanced thermionic emission (PETE) solar energy converters are newly proposed devices that can directly convert solar energy into electrical power at high temperatures. An analytical model based on a one-dimensional steady-state equation is developed to analyze the temperature-dependent performance of the solid-state [...] Read more.
Solid-state photon-enhanced thermionic emission (PETE) solar energy converters are newly proposed devices that can directly convert solar energy into electrical power at high temperatures. An analytical model based on a one-dimensional steady-state equation is developed to analyze the temperature-dependent performance of the solid-state PETE converter. The treatment used to derive the reverse saturation current density ( J 0 ) and open-circuit voltage ( V o c ) of the solid-state PETE converter is similar to that used in photovoltaic cells. Thus, their performances at elevated temperatures can be compared. Analysis results show that J 0 of the solid-state PETE converter with a GaAs absorption layer is approximately three orders of magnitude lower, and the decrease rate of open-circuit voltage ( d V o c / d T ) is smaller than that of a practical GaAs photovoltaic cell. The improved performance of the solid-state PETE converter at high temperatures is attributed to the simultaneous use of diffusion and ballistic transport to harvest photo-generated electrons. The results presented in this paper demonstrate that, besides using wide bandgap materials and increasing doping density, harvesting solar energy via PETE effect can effectively improve the performance of solar cells at elevated temperatures. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Electrothermal Modeling of Solar Cells and Modules)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Review

Jump to: Research

Open AccessReview
A Comprehensive Review on Bypass Diode Application on Photovoltaic Modules
Energies 2020, 13(10), 2472; https://doi.org/10.3390/en13102472 - 14 May 2020
Cited by 1
Abstract
Solar photovoltaic (PV) energy has shown significant expansion on the installed capacity over the last years. Most of its power systems are installed on rooftops, integrated into buildings. Considering the fast development of PV plants, it has becoming even more critical to understand [...] Read more.
Solar photovoltaic (PV) energy has shown significant expansion on the installed capacity over the last years. Most of its power systems are installed on rooftops, integrated into buildings. Considering the fast development of PV plants, it has becoming even more critical to understand the performance and reliability of such systems. One of the most common problems faced in PV plants occurs when solar cells receive non-uniform irradiance or partially shaded. The consequences of shading generally are prevented by bypass diodes. A significant number of studies and technical reports have been published as of today, based on extensive experience from research and field feedbacks. However, such material has not been cataloged or analyzed from a perspective of the technological evolution of bypass diodes devices. This paper presents a comprehensive review and highlights recent advances, ongoing research, and prospects, as reported in the literature, on bypass diode application on photovoltaic modules. First, it outlines the shading effect and hotspot problem on PV modules. Following, it explains bypass diodes’ working principle, as well as discusses how such devices can impact power output and PV modules’ reliability. Then, it gives a thorough review of recently published research, as well as the state of the art in the field. In conclusion, it makes a discussion on the overview and challenges to bypass diode as a mitigation technique. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Electrothermal Modeling of Solar Cells and Modules)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop