Special Issue "Improved Control of Heating Systems in Buildings with Low Temperature District Heating"

A special issue of Energies (ISSN 1996-1073). This special issue belongs to the section "Energy and Buildings".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 25 October 2021.

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Svend Svendsen
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
DTU CIVIL ENGINEERING, Department of Civil Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, BrovejBuilding 118, DK-2800 Kgs Lyngby, Denmark
Interests: low temperature district heating; digitalization of energy systems; HVAC system design; operation and service; low energy buildings
Dr. Michele Tunzi
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Civil Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, Brovej, Building 118, DK-2800 Kgs Lyngby, Denmark
Interests: low temperature district heating; digitalization of energy systems; HVAC system design; operation and service; low energy buildings

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The Guest Editors are inviting submissions to a Special Issue of Energies on the subject area of “Improved Control and Operation of Heating Systems in Buildings with Low Temperature District Heating.” The digitalization of the heating systems inside buildings through smart meter and heat cost allocation as well as through the development of artificial intelligence (AI) are opening to new opportunities for optimization and control. Furthermore, the use of data can help detecting and troubleshooting faults that are among the main barriers for the implementation of low temperatures. Hence, improving the control and operation of heating systems inside buildings represents a key research area to implement low temperatures in district heating networks and to support the transition towards a renewable energy system.

This Special Issue will deal with innovative optimization and control techniques for heating systems in buildings connected to district heating networks. Topics of interest for publication include, but are not limited to:

  • Digitalization of heating systems inside building
  • Fault detection and troubleshooting
  • Improved control for hydraulic balancing
  • Innovative operation and control methods for HVAC systems
  • Low temperatures for space heating and domestic hot water systems
  • Application of Internet of Things (IoT) and/or AI for the operation of heating systems
  • Optimal operation of heating systems and substations
  • Demand side management

Prof. Svend Svendsen
Dr. Michele Tunzi
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Energies is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Control methods
  • Digitalization
  • IoT and AI
  • Low temperatures
  • Heating systems
  • Substations

Published Papers (1 paper)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Article
Overview of Solutions for the Low-Temperature Operation of Domestic Hot-Water Systems with a Circulation Loop
Energies 2021, 14(11), 3350; https://doi.org/10.3390/en14113350 - 07 Jun 2021
Viewed by 336
Abstract
The operation of typical domestic hot water (DHW) systems with a storage tank and circulation loop, according to the regulations for hygiene and comfort, results in a significant heat demand at high operating temperatures that leads to high return temperatures to the district [...] Read more.
The operation of typical domestic hot water (DHW) systems with a storage tank and circulation loop, according to the regulations for hygiene and comfort, results in a significant heat demand at high operating temperatures that leads to high return temperatures to the district heating system. This article presents the potential for the low-temperature operation of new DHW solutions based on energy balance calculations and some tests in real buildings. The main results are three recommended solutions depending on combinations of the following three criteria: district heating supply temperature, relative circulation heat loss due to the use of hot water, and the existence of a low-temperature space heating system. The first solution, based on a heating power limitation in DHW tanks, with a safety functionality, may secure the required DHW temperature at all times, resulting in the limited heating power of the tank, extended reheating periods, and a DH return temperature of below 30 °C. The second solution, based on the redirection of the return flow from the DHW system to the low-temperature space heating system, can cool the return temperature to the level of the space heating system return temperature below 35 °C. The third solution, based on the use of a micro-booster heat pump system, can deliver circulation heat loss and result in a low return temperature below 35 °C. These solutions can help in the transition to low-temperature district heating. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop