Special Issue "The Digitalization of Assessing and Improving Teaching Quality"

A special issue of Education Sciences (ISSN 2227-7102). This special issue belongs to the section "Teacher Education".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 December 2021.

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Adrie J. Visscher
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
1. Section Teacher Development, University of Twente, 7522 NB Enschede, The Netherlands;
2. Faculty of Behavioural, Management and Social Sciences (BMS), ELAN Teacher Development (ELAN), University of Twente, 7522 NB Enschede, The Netherlands
Interests: teacher professionalization; school effectiveness; data-based decision making
Ms. Hannah Bijlsma
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Faculty of Behavioural, Management and Social Sciences (BMS), ELAN Teacher Development (ELAN), University of Twente, 7522 NB Enschede, The Netherlands
Interests: teaching quality; student perceptions; feedback; teacher professionalization
Dr. Marieke van Geel
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Faculty of Behavioural, Management and Social Sciences (BMS), ELAN Teacher Development (ELAN), University of Twente, 7522 NB Enschede, The Netherlands
Interests: teaching quality; teacher professionalization; differentiation

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

We are pleased to invite you to send in proposals for an article in the Special Issue “The Digitalization of Assessing and Improving Teaching Quality” of the journal Educational Sciences.  Articles can be original research articles and reviews.

This Special Issue aims to address the developments, advantages, and challenges of the digitalization of the assessment and the subsequent improvement of teaching quality. We invite authors to provide descriptions of manifestations of the digitalization of assessing teaching quality in combination with evidence about their reliability, validity, and impact on teaching quality and student achievement.

Research shows considerable variation in teacher impact on student achievement. Measuring teaching quality is therefore important as it can guide the professional development and improvement of teachers. Several measures of teaching quality exist—for example, the results of classroom observations conducted by external observers, student perceptions of teaching quality, teacher self-assessments, and student achievement tests.

Technological developments make it possible to obtain a picture of teaching quality using one or more of the aforementioned approaches in a digital way. Digital tools can support the collection and processing of teaching quality data, the rating of teaching quality itself, feeding back assessment results to teachers, and also the process of improving teaching quality.

Various digital tools have been developed, such as smartphone applications for collecting and feeding back measures of teaching quality, tools for rating teaching quality automatically, and digital cameras for recording lessons and for feeding back lesson parts to teachers. Such tools can be very helpful as they improve efficiency, enable the measurement of different perspectives on teaching quality, and can make the feedback to and support of teachers richer.

However, little is known about the validity of the measurements and about the use and effects of these digital forms of support. How valuable are the new possibilities for improving teaching quality? Are video-taped lessons better than typical live classroom observations? How valid are digitally collected student and teacher perceptions of the same lesson? How are digitally collected teaching quality ratings used for the professional development of teachers?

This Special Issue of the journal of Educational Sciences aims to address the developments, advantages, and challenges of the digitalization of the assessment and subsequent improvement of teaching quality. We invite authors to provide manifestations of the digitalization of assessing teaching quality in combination with evidence about their reliability, validity, and impact on teaching quality and student achievement.

Prof. Dr. Adrie J. Visscher
Ms. Hannah Bijlsma
Dr. Marieke van Geel
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a double-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Education Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • teaching quality
  • digitalization
  • validity
  • use
  • impact

Published Papers

This special issue is now open for submission, see below for planned papers.

Planned Papers

The below list represents only planned manuscripts. Some of these manuscripts have not been received by the Editorial Office yet. Papers submitted to MDPI journals are subject to peer-review.

Dear Colleagues,

We are pleased to invite you to send in proposals for an article in the Special Issue “The Digitalization of Assessing and Improving Teaching Quality” of the journal Educational Sciences.  Articles can be original research articles and reviews.

This Special Issue aims to address the developments, advantages, and challenges of the digitalization of the assessment and the subsequent improvement of teaching quality. We invite authors to provide descriptions of manifestations of the digitalization of assessing teaching quality in combination with evidence about their reliability, validity, and impact on teaching quality and student achievement.

Research shows considerable variation in teacher impact on student achievement. Measuring teaching quality is therefore important as it can guide the professional development and improvement of teachers. Several measures of teaching quality exist—for example, the results of classroom observations conducted by external observers, student perceptions of teaching quality, teacher self-assessments, and student achievement tests.

Technological developments make it possible to obtain a picture of teaching quality using one or more of the aforementioned approaches in a digital way. Digital tools can support the collection and processing of teaching quality data, the rating of teaching quality itself, feeding back assessment results to teachers, and also the process of improving teaching quality.

Various digital tools have been developed, such as smartphone applications for collecting and feeding back measures of teaching quality, tools for rating teaching quality automatically, and digital cameras for recording lessons and for feeding back lesson parts to teachers. Such tools can be very helpful as they improve efficiency, enable the measurement of different perspectives on teaching quality, and can make the feedback to and support of teachers richer.

However, little is known about the validity of the measurements and about the use and effects of these digital forms of support. How valuable are the new possibilities for improving teaching quality? Are video-taped lessons better than typical live classroom observations? How valid are digitally collected student and teacher perceptions of the same lesson? How are digitally collected teaching quality ratings used for the professional development of teachers?

This Special Issue of the journal of Educational Sciences aims to address the developments, advantages, and challenges of the digitalization of the assessment and subsequent improvement of teaching quality. We invite authors to provide manifestations of the digitalization of assessing teaching quality in combination with evidence about their reliability, validity, and impact on teaching quality and student achievement.

Prof. Dr. Adrie J. Visscher
Ms. Hannah Bijlsma
Dr. Marieke van Geel
Guest Editors

{snippet name="submission_info"}

Back to TopTop