Recent Advances in Plant-Pathogen Interactions

A special issue of Diversity (ISSN 1424-2818). This special issue belongs to the section "Microbial Diversity and Culture Collections".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (15 September 2023) | Viewed by 12123

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
Faculty of Horticulture, Mendeleum—Institute of Genetics, Mendel University in Brno, 69144 Lednice, Czech Republic
Interests: high-throughput sequencing; bioinformatics; plant pathology; metagenomics; small RNA; grapevine trunk pathogens
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Studies of plant–pathogen interactions have historically focused mainly on simple models of infection involving single host-single disease patterns. Plant infections usually involve multiple genera, species, and/or genotypes and exhibit complexities not captured in single host-single disease systems. Recent insights into co-infection systems focusing on host–pathogen interactions have to be included in this Special Issue. Moreover, the implications for host susceptibility/resistance are of interest. During the last several decades, the study of plant–pathogen interaction has been enriched by the advent of new technologies and the application of multiple omics platforms. Omics technologies reflect the dynamic concept of biological processes and provide a contemporary approach to viral, bacterial, and fungal pathogens.

The aim of this Special Issue is to cover multiple aspects of pathogen interactions, with emphasis on the application of individual- and multi-omics-based technologies to uncover novel insights into relationships of plants and their pathogens.

Dr. Ales Eichmeier
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Diversity is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  •  plant pathology
  •  high-throughput sequencing
  •  symptoms
  •  viroids
  •  viruses
  •  bacteria
  •  fungi
  •  omics technologies

Published Papers (6 papers)

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Research

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12 pages, 3881 KiB  
Article
Diversity of Botryosphaeriaceae Species Associated with Grapevine Trunk Diseases in the Czech Republic
by Milan Spetik, Dorota Anna Tekielska, Akila Berraf-Tebbal, Jakub Pecenka, Katerina Stuskova, Alla Eddine Mahamedi and Ales Eichmeier
Diversity 2023, 15(7), 800; https://doi.org/10.3390/d15070800 - 23 Jun 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1372
Abstract
During a study of Botryosphaeriaceae species associated with grapevine trunk diseases in the Czech Republic, a collection of 22 Botryosphaeriaceae-like strains were isolated from four cultivars (Blaufränkisch, Pálava, Pinot Noir, and Welschriesling) in four distinct vineyards. Based on morphology and DNA sequence [...] Read more.
During a study of Botryosphaeriaceae species associated with grapevine trunk diseases in the Czech Republic, a collection of 22 Botryosphaeriaceae-like strains were isolated from four cultivars (Blaufränkisch, Pálava, Pinot Noir, and Welschriesling) in four distinct vineyards. Based on morphology and DNA sequence data (ITS, tub2, and tef), four species were identified: Botryosphaeria dothidea, Diplodia mutila, D. seriata, and Neofusicoccum parvum. These species are reported for the first time from grapevine in the Czech Republic. Relationships between vascular lesions and particular species were highlighted in this study. Diplodia seriata was the most frequently isolated species, present in all four sampled cultivars, while D. mutila was the least frequent, present only in ‘Pálava’. The cultivar Pinot Noir was the most tolerant host for Botryosphaeriaceae fungi. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recent Advances in Plant-Pathogen Interactions)
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13 pages, 2123 KiB  
Article
Characterization of Tomato Brown Rugose Fruit Virus (ToBRFV) Detected in Czech Republic
by Ales Eichmeier, Miroslava Hejlova, Hana Orsagova, Lucie Frejlichova, Eliska Hakalova, Katerina Tomankova, Sarka Linhartova, Pavel Kulich, Vaclav Cermak and Jana Cechova
Diversity 2023, 15(2), 301; https://doi.org/10.3390/d15020301 - 18 Feb 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 2801
Abstract
Tomato is the most consumed vegetable in the world. The tomato brown rugose fruit virus (ToBRFV) is an important destructive virus that damages tomatoes and peppers with significant economic impact. The detection and characterization of this important viral pathogen were evaluated at the [...] Read more.
Tomato is the most consumed vegetable in the world. The tomato brown rugose fruit virus (ToBRFV) is an important destructive virus that damages tomatoes and peppers with significant economic impact. The detection and characterization of this important viral pathogen were evaluated at the molecular and morphological level. The viral isolate was purified and inoculated on tomato and pepper plants. Small RNAs were sequenced in both plants and the profiles were compared. The complete genome of the isolate was obtained, and microRNA (miRNA) profiles were unveiled by small RNA sequencing. Symptoms caused by the isolate were also described and the morphology of the isolate was observed by transmission electron microscopy. Our results contribute to further understanding of the role of miRNAs in ToBRFV pathogenesis, which may be crucial for understanding disease symptom development in tomatoes and peppers. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recent Advances in Plant-Pathogen Interactions)
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14 pages, 1206 KiB  
Article
Strong Genetic Differentiation between Generalist Populations of Venturia inaequalis and Populations from Partially Resistant Apple Cultivars Carrying Rvi3 or Rvi5
by David Papp, Shambhulinga Gangadharappa Harigondra, Cristina Paredes, Anita Karacs-Végh, Károly Penksza, Ildikó T.-Járdi and Viktor Papp
Diversity 2022, 14(12), 1050; https://doi.org/10.3390/d14121050 - 30 Nov 2022
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1633
Abstract
The ascomycete fungus Venturia inaequalis causes scab disease, a major problem in apple production. The utilization of resistant cultivars is hindered by emerging new pathogen races, which erode their resistance. Increasing our knowledge on the population genetic processes of the fungus can contribute [...] Read more.
The ascomycete fungus Venturia inaequalis causes scab disease, a major problem in apple production. The utilization of resistant cultivars is hindered by emerging new pathogen races, which erode their resistance. Increasing our knowledge on the population genetic processes of the fungus can contribute to the development of resistance gene deployment strategies and more durable resistance. We investigated the effect of four scab race indicator cultivars, ‘Gala’ (no R-gene), ‘Golden Delicious’ (Rvi1), ‘Geneva’ (Rvi3, complex), and OR45t132 (Rvi5), on the V. inaequalis population genetic structure and diversity. Sixty-six monosporic fungal isolates from the four cultivars were genotyped with seven simple sequence repeat primers. Furthermore, the partial resistance of the indicators and the pathogenicity profile of the conidia from each host were assessed. The genetic diversity and structure of the investigated V. inaequalis subpopulations correspond to the partial resistance of the original hosts as well as the subpopulations’ pathogenicity profiles. Indicators carrying Rvi3 and Rvi5 had strongly diverged and specialized V. inaequalis populations on them and fewer symptoms on the field. In line with the complete breakdown of the Rvi1 gene, the population from ‘Golden Delicious’ did not segregate from the susceptible ‘Gala’, and virulence towards Rvi1 was present in all subpopulations. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recent Advances in Plant-Pathogen Interactions)
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10 pages, 1866 KiB  
Communication
Effect of Plant Growth Promoting Microorganisms on Pepper Plants Infected with Tomato Brown Rugose Fruit Virus
by Lucia Ragasová, Eliška Hakalová, Vojtěch Ferby, Jana Čechová, Gabriela Klapcová and Robert Pokluda
Diversity 2022, 14(8), 635; https://doi.org/10.3390/d14080635 - 10 Aug 2022
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 2147
Abstract
Symbiotic interaction between plants and microorganisms in the rhizosphere is an important factor affecting plant growth and fitness. Arbuscular mycorrhiza fungi symbiosis increases resistance of the plants to stress factors, including pathogens. Tomato brown rugose fruit virus (ToBRFV) is an important destructive virus [...] Read more.
Symbiotic interaction between plants and microorganisms in the rhizosphere is an important factor affecting plant growth and fitness. Arbuscular mycorrhiza fungi symbiosis increases resistance of the plants to stress factors, including pathogens. Tomato brown rugose fruit virus (ToBRFV) is an important destructive virus damaging tomatoes and peppers with losses that can reach 100%. It is listed on the list of current quarantine organisms in the Czech Republic. The aim of this study was to evaluate influence of root colonization with Funneliformis mosseae or/and Azospirillum brasilense on ToBRFV symptoms and viral titre reduction. Plants treated with arbuscular mycorhizal fungi (AMF) had lower symptom emergence after 14 dpi, however there was no difference in symptoms emergence after 21 dpi within all treatments. The highest colonization intensity by Funneliformis mosseae was detected in ToBRFV negative plants treated with both AMF and Azospirillum (AZO) and the lowest in ToBRFV positive plants with the same treatment (AMF + AZO). Colonization intensity of Azospirillum brasilense in all treated variants went from 20% to 41%. Results suggest that the combination of those two beneficial microorganisms in ToBRFV-infected plants negatively affected AMF colonization. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recent Advances in Plant-Pathogen Interactions)
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Review

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10 pages, 488 KiB  
Review
Possible Reasons Affecting Different Phytophthora infestans Populations in Tomato and Potato Isolates in Thailand
by Nattaya Srisawad, Kamonsiri Petchaboon, Supajit Sraphet, Piengtawan Tappiban and Kanokporn Triwitayakorn
Diversity 2023, 15(11), 1121; https://doi.org/10.3390/d15111121 - 30 Oct 2023
Viewed by 1246
Abstract
Late blight, caused by the oomycete Phytophthora infestans, is one of the most important diseases affecting tomato and potato production worldwide. In Thailand, the disease is widespread in the north and northeast, especially in the Chiang-Mai and Tak provinces. The mating type, [...] Read more.
Late blight, caused by the oomycete Phytophthora infestans, is one of the most important diseases affecting tomato and potato production worldwide. In Thailand, the disease is widespread in the north and northeast, especially in the Chiang-Mai and Tak provinces. The mating type, metalaxyl sensitivity, mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) haplotype, RG57 fingerprinting, and microsatellite were used to characterize the P. infestans populations. The study revealed that the P. infestans of tomato isolates in Thailand are of the same lineage as those from 1994 until 2002. The clonal lineages that were found in the potato populations have changed since 1994. The changes in P. infestans isolates in the potato populations have likely been the result of the import of seed potatoes to Thailand. Furthermore, the P. infestans populations in potatoes show resistance to metalaxyl, whereas those from tomato isolates show sensitivity to fungicides. The reasons for the different responses can be attributed to (i) the use of metalaxyl, (ii) the host preferences of P. infestans, and (iii) the migration of new genotypes from infected potato seeds. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recent Advances in Plant-Pathogen Interactions)
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Other

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12 pages, 3706 KiB  
Brief Report
Morphology, Phylogeny, and Pathogenicity of Colletotrichum Species Causing Anthracnose in Camellia japonica in China
by Lixia Wen and He Li
Diversity 2023, 15(4), 516; https://doi.org/10.3390/d15040516 - 3 Apr 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1681
Abstract
Camellia japonica is a renowned flower and an influential plant in Chinese urban landscaping. However, Colletotrichum, one of the world’s most commercially important phytopathogenic genera that causes anthracnose on a wide range of plant species, have annually caused significant economic losses to [...] Read more.
Camellia japonica is a renowned flower and an influential plant in Chinese urban landscaping. However, Colletotrichum, one of the world’s most commercially important phytopathogenic genera that causes anthracnose on a wide range of plant species, have annually caused significant economic losses to Ca. japonica. In this study, 115 strains were isolated from Ca. japonica leaves with typical symptoms from the provinces of Hunan, Jiangxi, Hainan, Guangxi, Hubei, Chongqing, Guizhou, and Shanxi. They were then subjected to pathogen identification and using method of morphology combined with ApMat gene sequence analysis, along with the pathogenicity tests based on Koch’s postulates. The 115 strains were identified as C. gloeosporioides, C. fructicola, C. siamense, C. camelliae or C. aeschynomenes. Pathogenicity tests revealed that all species produced brown lesions on healthy Ca. japonica leaves, indicating significant virulence. Furthermore, C. fructicola had the broadest distribution and the highest isolation rate., Most importantly, this is the first report in China of C. aeschynomenes causing the anthracnose disease in Ca. japonica. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recent Advances in Plant-Pathogen Interactions)
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