Special Issue "Challenges and Advances in Monitoring and Diagnosis in Medical Sciences"

A special issue of Diagnostics (ISSN 2075-4418). This special issue belongs to the section "Point-of-Care Diagnostics and Devices".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 15 January 2021.

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Mihaela Badea
Website
Guest Editor
Transilvania University of Brasov, Faculty of Medicine, Brasov, Romania
Interests: development and optimization of bioanalytical methods with applications in the life sciences; electrochemical (bio)sensors; studies on the involvement of antioxidant systems in different biochemical mechanisms; correlation of environmental factors with chronic diseases; toxicological studies for detecting contaminants from different media; studies of plant food supplements—composition, safety, beneficial effects, consumer profile; telemonitoring–telediagnostic for life sciences; biocompatibility studies for new biomaterials
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. Laura Elena Gaman
Website
Guest Editor
“Carol Davila” University of Medicine and Pharmacy Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Bucharest, Romania
Interests: the oxidative stress associated with different diseases: mitochondrial disease in children, atherosclerosis and cardiovascular disease, neurological disease like schizophrenia, Alzheimer’s, diabetes, renal chronic disease
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Monitoring and diagnosis in medical sciences require a combination of medical skills, most of the time involving multidisciplinary teams. The beginning of analysis starts with specific signs and symptoms, and the recommendation of classic and modern lab tests and/or computer-assisted diagnostics. (Tele)diagnosis and (tele)monitoring are important for modern medicine in order to have continuous information about patient status and recovery progress. Medical approaches for a personalized diagnosis and treatment of each patient are the recent and future healthcare recommendations.

This Special Issue aims to invite authors to present their challenging experiences in monitoring and diagnosis in medical sciences.

We invite the submission of original manuscripts dealing with the proposed topics, including but not limited to these presented in the frame of the International Conference NT-SMT-LS 2020 (http://www.healthfoodenviron.unitbv.ro/2020/), to be held in Bucharest, Romania. A special discount of 10% will be provided to papers presented during the conference if the article is accepted by at least two independent reviewers of the journal.

The submission deadline is 15 January 2021. You may send your manuscript at any point from now until the deadline.

We look forward to welcoming your contribution to this Special Issue.

Prof. Dr. Mihaela Badea
Assoc Prof. Dr. Laura Elena Gaman
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Diagnostics is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Inertial Sensors as a Tool for Diagnosing Discopathy Lumbosacral Pathologic Gait: A Preliminary Research
Diagnostics 2020, 10(6), 342; https://doi.org/10.3390/diagnostics10060342 - 26 May 2020
Abstract
Background: the goal of the study is to ascertain the influence of discopathy in the lumbosacral (L-S) segment on the gait parameters. The inertial sensors are used to determine the pathologic parameters of gait. Methods: the study involved four patients (44, 46, 42, [...] Read more.
Background: the goal of the study is to ascertain the influence of discopathy in the lumbosacral (L-S) segment on the gait parameters. The inertial sensors are used to determine the pathologic parameters of gait. Methods: the study involved four patients (44, 46, 42, and 38 years). First, the goal of the survey was to analyze by a noninvasive medical test magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of each patient. Next, by using inertial sensors, the flexion-extension of joint angles of the left and right knees were calculated. The statistical analysis was performed. The wavelet transform was applied to analyze periodic information in the acceleration data. Results: in the patients with discopathy, the amount of knee flexion attained during stance phase is significantly lower than that of normal (health side), which could indicate poor eccentric control or a pain avoidance mechanism. The biggest differences are observed in the Initial Swing phase. Bending of the lower limb in the knee joint at this stage reaches maximum values during the entire gait cycle. Conclusions: It has been difficult to quantify the knee angle during gait by visual inspection. The inertial measurement unit (IMU) system can be useful in determining the level of spine damage and its degree. In patients in the first stages of the intervertebral disc disease who may undergo conservative treatment, it may also partially delay or completely exclude the decision to perform a complicated imaging examination which is MRI, often showing a false positive result in this phase of the disease. Full article
Open AccessArticle
Circulating Monocyte Count as a Surrogate Marker for Ventricular-Arterial Remodeling and Incident Heart Failure with Preserved Ejection Fraction
Diagnostics 2020, 10(5), 287; https://doi.org/10.3390/diagnostics10050287 - 08 May 2020
Abstract
Among 2085 asymptomatic subjects (age: 51.0 ± 10.7 years, 41.3% female) with data available on common carotid artery diameter (CCAD) and circulating total white blood cell (WBC) counts, higher circulating leukocytes positively correlated with higher high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP). Higher WBC/segmented cells [...] Read more.
Among 2085 asymptomatic subjects (age: 51.0 ± 10.7 years, 41.3% female) with data available on common carotid artery diameter (CCAD) and circulating total white blood cell (WBC) counts, higher circulating leukocytes positively correlated with higher high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP). Higher WBC/segmented cells and monocyte counts were independently associated with greater relative wall thicknesses and larger CCADs, which in general were more pronounced in men and obese subjects (body mass index ≥ 25 kg/m2) (all P interaction: < 0.05). Using multivariate adjusting models, only the monocyte count independently predicted the left ventricular mass index (LVMi) (ß-Coef: 0.06, p = 0.01). Higher circulating WBC, segmented, and monocyte counts and a greater CCAD were all independently associated with a higher risk of heart failure (HF)/all-cause death during a median of 12.1 years of follow-up in fully adjusted models, with individuals manifesting both higher CCADs and monocyte counts incurring the highest risk of HF/death (adjusted hazard ratio: 2.81, 95% CI: 1.57. −5.03, p < 0.001; P interaction, 0.035; lower CCAD/lower monocyte as reference). We conclude that a higher monocyte count is associated with cardiac remodeling and carotid artery dilation. Both an elevated monocyte count and a larger CCAD may indicate a specific phenotype that confers the highest risk of HF, which likely signifies the role of circulating monocytes in the pathophysiology of heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF). Full article
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