Special Issue "Risk Management in Oral Surgery"

A special issue of Dentistry Journal (ISSN 2304-6767).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 June 2022.

Special Issue Editor

Dott. Christian Bacci PhD
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Oral Pathology and Surgery, Clinica Odontoiatrica, Azienda Ospedale Università Padova, via Giustiniani 1, 35128 Padova, Italy
Interests: Interests: oral surgery; oral pathology and medicine; oral surgery in medically compromised patients; hemostasis pathologies

Special Issue Information

New Frontiers in Orthodontics aims to express the ongoing debate in Risk Management in Oral Surgery.

Modern oral surgery is able to perform procedures that were unthinkable only a few years ago. Many treatments that were once performed exclusively in hospitals are now frequently delivered in outpatient clinical settings.

Most of all, patient safety and the success of surgical treatment remain fundamental. Patients with pathologies that are complex from a systemic point of view can be treated in complete safety and no longer receive what was called "simplified dentistry" but dental care with very high standards.

Many patients receive pharmacological treatments that require special precautions for the correct management of the perioperative risk. Patients with systemic diseases have the right to receive treatment with very high standards, and surgeons have a duty to provide these treatments in complete safety. This objective can be achieved thanks to the updating of guidance and collaboration with colleagues from other specialties.

The aim of this Special Issue is to collect highly significant publications that can attest to this method of treatment.

Dott. Christian Bacci PhD
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Dentistry Journal is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Oral surgery
  • Systemic diseases
  • Local anesthesia
  • Conscious sedation

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

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Article
Third Molar Extraction: Irrigation and Cooling with Water or Sterile Physiological Solution: A Double-Blind Randomized Study
Dent. J. 2021, 9(4), 40; https://doi.org/10.3390/dj9040040 - 01 Apr 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 772
Abstract
Background: The present study aimed to ascertain whether any significant reduction in patients’ postoperative pain and inflammation could be achieved by using sterile physiological solution instead of normal water to irrigate the surgical field and cool the dental bur during third molar extractions. [...] Read more.
Background: The present study aimed to ascertain whether any significant reduction in patients’ postoperative pain and inflammation could be achieved by using sterile physiological solution instead of normal water to irrigate the surgical field and cool the dental bur during third molar extractions. Methods: The study concerned 22 patients (11 females and 11 males) in good general health, who were referred to the Dental Clinic at Padova University hospital for lower third molar extractions. They were randomly assigned to two groups. Only the fluid used to irrigate the surgical field and cool the dental bur differed between the two study groups, being sterile physiological solution for group A, and mains water for group B. Postoperative pain, swelling, trismus and inflammation with high sensitivity CRP where measured and statistically evaluated. The numerosity of our sample was calculated on the grounds of an endpoint based on data in the literature. Results: Eighteen patients needed bilateral extractions, and 4 required only one extraction, so a total of 40 third molars were extracted. A sterile physiological solution was used to irrigate the surgical field in 20 extractions, while water was used in the other 20 cases. Data analysis with Wilcoxon test show no differences between the two groups (p < 0.05). Conclusions: no differences between groups for any of the parameters considered, after third molar extraction procedures undertaken using either sterile physiological solution or water for irrigation and cooling purposes. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Risk Management in Oral Surgery)
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Article
CBCT Radiological Features as Predictors of Nerve Injuries in Third Molar Extractions: Multicenter Prospective Study on a Northeastern Italian Population
Dent. J. 2021, 9(2), 23; https://doi.org/10.3390/dj9020023 - 21 Feb 2021
Viewed by 1004
Abstract
Background: Neurological alterations are one of the main complications occurring after the third molar extractions. The aim of this prospective multicenter cohort study was to find out Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT) features and distribution of neurological complications in patients undergoing lower third [...] Read more.
Background: Neurological alterations are one of the main complications occurring after the third molar extractions. The aim of this prospective multicenter cohort study was to find out Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT) features and distribution of neurological complications in patients undergoing lower third molar surgery and to determine the radiological and patient-related factors that could be correlated to the occurrence of inferior alveolar and lingual nerves injury. Material and Methods: 378 patients who underwent lower third molar extraction from March 2018 to March 2019 were included. Clinical and radiological data were collected. CBCT features were recorded following Maglione et al. classification. Symptoms and characteristics of patients who experienced neurological alterations were evaluated. Results: 193 patients needed a second-level radiological exam (CBCT). In these patients, the most common feature was Maglione class 3: a higher frequency of apical or buccal mandibular canals in direct contact with the tooth was observed. 3.17% of the patients developed a neurological complication. Maglione class 4, increased age, and operative time were all positively correlated with neurological alterations. Conclusions: while the buccal or apical position of the mandibular canal was the more common findings, the lingual position was found to have a higher correlation with a negative outcome. Age and operative time were also found to be risk factors for developing nerve injury in the considered population. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Risk Management in Oral Surgery)
Article
The Importance of Alliance between Hematologists and Dentists: A Retrospective Study on the Development of Bisphosphonates Osteonecrosis of the Jaws (Bronj) in Multiple Myeloma Patients
Dent. J. 2021, 9(2), 11; https://doi.org/10.3390/dj9020011 - 20 Jan 2021
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 955
Abstract
(1) Background: Multiple myeloma is a rare cancer that primarily affects the bone marrow. Osteoclasts are responsible for increased bone resorption and, therefore, bone destruction. Bisphosphonates are a class of drugs that can slow down bone resorption by reducing the number and action [...] Read more.
(1) Background: Multiple myeloma is a rare cancer that primarily affects the bone marrow. Osteoclasts are responsible for increased bone resorption and, therefore, bone destruction. Bisphosphonates are a class of drugs that can slow down bone resorption by reducing the number and action of osteoclasts. Intravenous injections of bisphosphonates (generally Zoledronic Acid) are administered to patients affected by Multiple Myeloma, but BRONJ is described as a serious side effect. This 5-year retrospective study aims to evaluate the efficacy of appropriate dental treatment protocols prior to initiating bisphosphonate therapy to prevent the development of BRONJ. (2) Methods: A total of 99 patients with symptomatic multiple myeloma were involved in this study (41–90 years, mean age 65 years, standard deviation 5 years). The data relating to the visits were tracked using a specific server and consulting the clinical reports. The AAOMS (American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons) position was applied for both diagnosis and treatment. A total of 79 patients were examined before the administration of bisphosphonates (group A) and 20 after (group B). (3) Results: The entire sample required dental treatment: 23.2% underwent restorative therapy, 8% endodontic treatments, 44.4% tooth extractions. Periodontal disease was present in 41.4% of the patients. No osteonecrosis was observed in the first group, whereas BRONJ was found in five patients of the second one (25%) and two patients (10%) showed osteosclerotic areas under investigation [OR 0.026 (CI 0.0027 to 0.2454)]. (4) Conclusions: In the literature, there are no precise data about the prevalence of BRONJ. Despite the limitation of the present study, we point out that dental treatment before the treatment with intravenous bisphosphonates can help in reducing the incidence of BRONJ and good dental status is necessary for BRONJ prevention. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Risk Management in Oral Surgery)
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Review

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Review
Vitamin D and Its Role in Oral Diseases Development. Scoping Review
Dent. J. 2021, 9(11), 129; https://doi.org/10.3390/dj9110129 - 02 Nov 2021
Viewed by 496
Abstract
Vitamin D is a fat-soluble secosteroid that plays a significant role in the whole body, including the maxillofacial region. The discovery of its receptors in many cells and organs made it possible to reveal the participation of vitamin D not only in the [...] Read more.
Vitamin D is a fat-soluble secosteroid that plays a significant role in the whole body, including the maxillofacial region. The discovery of its receptors in many cells and organs made it possible to reveal the participation of vitamin D not only in the regulation of calcium phosphate metabolism, but also in immune processes, in providing anti-inflammatory and antimicrobial effects, slowing down cell proliferation and stimulating differentiation. In this literature review, we demonstrate the association between low vitamin D levels and the development of recurrent aphthous stomatitis, the course and response to treatment of squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity, the severity of periodontal diseases, and the processes of osseointegration and bone remodeling during dental implantation and guided tissue regeneration. The aim of our article was to demonstate a possible connection between vitamin D level and the oral diseases that can be presented at an oral surgery appointment, which will help clinicians to reduce the risk of early dental implant failure, ensure favorable outcomes of augmentative operations, as well as decrease the destructive effects of severe periodontitis and other conditions throug knowledge and timely lab tests and endocrinologist prescriptions. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Risk Management in Oral Surgery)
Review
Pregnancy and Dentistry: A Literature Review on Risk Management during Dental Surgical Procedures
Dent. J. 2021, 9(4), 46; https://doi.org/10.3390/dj9040046 - 19 Apr 2021
Viewed by 1213
Abstract
Background: Pregnancy is a unique moment in a woman’s life, accompanied with several physiologic changes that have an impact on oral health. Aim of the study: The purpose of the present study was to conduct a critical review of published literature regarding pregnancy [...] Read more.
Background: Pregnancy is a unique moment in a woman’s life, accompanied with several physiologic changes that have an impact on oral health. Aim of the study: The purpose of the present study was to conduct a critical review of published literature regarding pregnancy and dentistry, the most frequent oral diseases that are encountered during pregnancy, their correlation to adverse pregnancy events, and safe dental treatments that can be performed during pregnancy. Methods: A Medline/COCHRANE search was carried using specific keywords and MeSH terms, combined with the boolean operators “OR” and “AND”. Results: The search led to 146 publications including guidelines, meta-analyses, systematic and non-systematic reviews, published between 2000 and 2021. Discussion and conclusions: Due to the increased inflammatory and immune body response that characterizes pregnancy, periodontal conditions are often aggravated during pregnancy and periodontal disease encountered frequently in pregnant patients. There are conflicting study results in the literature regarding the association between periodontitis and adverse pregnancy outcomes. Periodontal treatment did not show a significant reduction in the adverse outcomes. Many dentists, often due to lack of information, are reluctant to provide dental treatment to pregnant women. However, preventive and restorative dental treatment is safe during pregnancy. Diagnostic radiographs may be performed after the first trimester if absolutely necessary. Analgesics (such as paracetamol) and anesthetics (such as lidocaine) are also considered safe. In case of infection, antibacterial drugs such as amoxicillin, ampicillin, and some cephalosporines and macrolides can also be prescribed. Organogenesis takes place in the first trimester, the time during which the fetus is susceptible to severe malformations (teratogenesis). The ideal time to perform dental treatment is the second trimester (week 17 to 28). However, acute pain or infections make the intervention of the dentist absolutely necessary and emergency treatment can be performed during the whole pregnancy period. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Risk Management in Oral Surgery)
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