Special Issue "In-Situ Transmission Electron Microscopy for Crystal Structural Analysis"

A special issue of Crystals (ISSN 2073-4352). This special issue belongs to the section "Crystal Engineering".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 15 February 2020.

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Liudmila Fedina
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Institute of Semiconductor Physics, Siberian Branch, Russian Academy of Sciences, Novosibirsk, Russian Federation
Interests: in situ HVEM, HRTEM and REM, formation of point defect clusters and extended defects in Si, dislocation core structures, surface

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The possibilities of state-of-the-art in-situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) for the studying of crystal structure transformations at the atomic scale or under external exposures are so great that they cannot be overestimated or even a priori foreseen. They allow, for instance, one to see atomic dances in graphene and silica 2D layers or fast dislocation dynamics providing crystalline-to-amorphous structural transition in Ge2Sb2Te5-nanowire used for nonvolatile memory devices. Such excellent results obtained by in situ TEM allow not only a better understanding of the fundamental properties of crystalline materials and the role of defects ensuring structural transformations but also the operation of devices based on them. Using in situ TEM, the role of many influences (annealing, deformations, electric pulses, electron beam irradiation, etc.) causing transformations of the crystal structure and the appearance of its useful properties necessary for the development of new technologies and devices could be established.

This Special Issue on "In-Situ Transmission Electron Microscopy for Crystal Structural Analysis" aims to collect new results and knowledge achieved in this area in order to demonstrate yet the unknown possibilities of this unique method and attract the attention of researchers to use it more widely.

Dr. Liudmila Fedina
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Crystals is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • In situ TEM
  • Transformations
  • Deformations
  • Irradiation
  • 3D crystals
  • 2D crystals
  • Nanostructures
  • Defects

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
In Situ TEM Crystallization of Amorphous Iron Particles
Crystals 2020, 10(1), 41; https://doi.org/10.3390/cryst10010041 - 17 Jan 2020
Abstract
Even though sub-micron and nano-sized iron particles generally display single or polycrystalline structures, a growing interest has also been dedicated to the class of amorphous ones, whose absence of a crystal structure is capable of modifying their physical properties. Among the several routes [...] Read more.
Even though sub-micron and nano-sized iron particles generally display single or polycrystalline structures, a growing interest has also been dedicated to the class of amorphous ones, whose absence of a crystal structure is capable of modifying their physical properties. Among the several routes so far described to prepare amorphous iron particles, we report here about the crystallization of those prepared by chemical reduction of Fe3+ ions using NaBH4, with sizes ranging between 80 and 200 nm and showing a high stability against oxidation. Their crystallization was investigated by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and in situ heating transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The latter technique was performed by the combined use of electron diffraction of a selected sample area, and bright and dark field TEM imaging, and allowed determining that the crystallization turns the starting amorphous particles into polycrystalline α-Fe ones. Also, under the high vacuum of the TEM column, the crystallization temperature of the particles shifted to 550 °C from the 465 °C, previously observed by DSC and XRD under 105 Pa of Ar. This indicates the pivotal role of the external pressure in influencing the starting point of phase transition. Conversely, upon both the DSC/XRD pressure and the TEM vacuum conditions, the mean size of the crystal domains increases as a consequence of further thermal increase, even if with some pressure-related differences. Full article
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