Special Issue "Conducting Ceramics"

A special issue of Crystals (ISSN 2073-4352). This special issue belongs to the section "Crystalline Materials".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 March 2020.

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Maria Gazda
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Faculty of Applied Physics and Mathematics, Gdansk University of Technology, 80-233 Gdansk, Poland
Interests: proton conducting ceramics; mixed electron-ion conductrs; perovskites; high-temperature superconductors; X-ray diffraction
Dr. Tadeusz Miruszewski
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Gdańsk University of Technology, Gdansk, Poland

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Ceramics is traditionally considered as electrically insulating; however, several groups of modern advanced ceramics are conductors of electric currents. Among them, there are high-temperature superconductors, metal-like conducting ceramics, semiconductors, as well as ionically conducting ceramics. The electric and electrochemical properties of conducting ceramics, apart from their chemical composition, may depend strongly on their micro/nanostructure, porosity, defect interaction, redox processes, atmosphere composition, etc. Therefore, their properties may be modified through both powder fabrication and its densification and shaping into products. Moreover, many ceramic materials undergo structural phase transitions. The variety of phenomena related to charge transport in ceramics render them very interesting for practical applications. Indeed, conducting ceramics has been applied in superconducting electromagnets, gas sensors, solid oxide fuel cells, batteries, varistors, memory cells, and other electroceramic devices.
The Special Issue on “Conducting Ceramics” is intended to provide a unique interdisciplinary international forum aimed at presenting and discussing results concerning the fabrication, characterization, and properties of conducting ceramics as well as the characterization of devices based on conducting ceramics. Scientists working in a wide range of disciplines are invited to contribute to this Issue.
Examples of the topics that may be included in the Special Issue on “Conducting Ceramics” are listed under the keywords.

Prof. Dr. Maria Gazda
Dr. Tadeusz Miruszewski
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Crystals is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Electronic conductivity and superconductivity of ceramics
  • Ionic ceramic conductors
  • Mixed ceramic conductors
  • Fabrication and shaping of conducting ceramics
  • Electroceramic devices

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Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Correlation between Crystal Structure and Thermoelectric Properties of Sr1−xTi0.9Nb0.1O3−δ Ceramics
Crystals 2020, 10(2), 100; https://doi.org/10.3390/cryst10020100 - 09 Feb 2020
Abstract
Polycrystalline Sr1−xTi0.9Nb0.1O3−δ (x = 0, 0.1, 0.2) ceramics have been prepared by the solid state method and their structural and thermoelectric properties have been studied by neutron powder diffraction (NPD), thermal, and transport measurements. The structural [...] Read more.
Polycrystalline Sr1−xTi0.9Nb0.1O3−δ (x = 0, 0.1, 0.2) ceramics have been prepared by the solid state method and their structural and thermoelectric properties have been studied by neutron powder diffraction (NPD), thermal, and transport measurements. The structural analysis of Sr1-xTi0.9Nb0.1O3−δ (x = 0.1, 0.2) confirms the presence of a significant amount of oxygen vacancies, associated with the Sr-deficiency of the materials. The analysis of the anisotropic displacement parameters (ADPs) indicates a strong softening of the overall phonon modes for these samples, which is confirmed by the extremely low thermal conductivity value (κ ≈ 1.6 W m-1 K−1 at 823 K) found for Sr1−xTi0.9Nb0.1O3−δ (x = 0.1, 0.2). This approach of introducing A-site cation vacancies for decreasing the thermal conductivity seems more effective than the classical substitution of strontium by rare-earth elements in SrTiO3 and opens a new optimization scheme for the thermoelectric properties of oxides. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Conducting Ceramics)
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Open AccessArticle
Study in Optical and Mechanical Properties of Nd3+, Y3+: SrF2 Transparent Ceramics Prepared by Hot-Pressing and Hot-Forming Techniques
Crystals 2019, 9(12), 619; https://doi.org/10.3390/cryst9120619 - 26 Nov 2019
Abstract
Nd3+, Y3+: SrF2 transparent ceramics were successfully synthesized by two methods: hot-forming and hot-pressing techniques. The mechanical properties and optical properties of the hot-formed Nd3+, Y3+: SrF2 transparent ceramics were much better than [...] Read more.
Nd3+, Y3+: SrF2 transparent ceramics were successfully synthesized by two methods: hot-forming and hot-pressing techniques. The mechanical properties and optical properties of the hot-formed Nd3+, Y3+: SrF2 transparent ceramics were much better than that of single crystal. On the other hand, the transmittance of the hot-formed transparent ceramics with different deformation rate reached up to 90% at 1054 nm, which is superior to the hot-pressed ceramics. Furthermore, the fracture toughness of hot-formed Nd3+, Y3+: SrF2 transparent ceramics with the deformation rate of 51% reached up to 0.70 MPa m1/2, which is nearly 1.5 times higher than that of as-grown single crystal. The full width at half maximum (FWHM) of the hot-formed ceramic is larger than that of the single crystal at 1053 nm under continuous-wave (CW) laser operation. The thermal conductivity of Nd3+, Y3+: SrF2 single crystal and hot-formed ceramics were also discussed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Conducting Ceramics)
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Planned Papers

The below list represents only planned manuscripts. Some of these manuscripts have not been received by the Editorial Office yet. Papers submitted to MDPI journals are subject to peer-review.

Title: Reduced sintering temperatures of Li-ion conductive Li1.3Al0.3Ti1.7(PO4)3 ceramic
Authors: Katja Waetzig, Christian Heubner, Mihails Kusnezoff
Affiliation: Fraunhofer IKTS, Fraunhofer Institute for Ceramic Technologies and Systems IKTS, Winterbergstrasse 28, 01277 Dresden, Germany.
Abstract: All-solid-state batteries (ASSB) are considered promising candidates for future energy storage and advanced electric mobility. When compared to conventional Li-ion batteries, the substitution of Li-ion conductive, flammable liquids by a solid electrolyte and the application of Li-metal anodes substantially increase safety and energy density. The solid electrolyte Li1.3Al0.3Ti1.7(PO4)3 (LATP) provides high Li ion conductivity of about 10-3 S/cm and is considered as a highly promising candidate for both, the solid electrolyte-separator and the ionically conductive part of the all-solid state composite cathode, consisting of the cathode material, the solid electrolyte and an electron conductor. Co-sintering of the composite cathode is a sophisticated challenge, because temperatures above 1000 °C are typically required to achieve the maximum ionic conductivity of LATP but provoke reactions with the cathode material, inhibiting proper electrochemical functioning in the ASSB. In the present study, the application of sintering aids with different melting points and their impact on the sinterability and the conductivity of LATP is investigated by means of optical dilatometry and impedance spectroscopy. The microstructure of the samples is analyzed by SEM. The results indicate that the sintering temperature can be reduced below 800 °C while maintaining high ionic conductivity of up to 3.6 x 10-4 S/cm. These insights can be considered a crucial step forward to enable LATP based composite cathodes for future ASSB.

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