Special Issue "Advances in Pulsed Laser Ablation Techniques"

A special issue of Coatings (ISSN 2079-6412). This special issue belongs to the section "Thin Films".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 15 February 2022.

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Roberto Teghil
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Università degli Studi della Basilicata, Dipartimento di Scienze, Potenza, Italy
Interests: thin film deposition; laser ablation; ultra-short pulse lasers; plasma techniques; nanotechnologies; ceramic materials
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Prof. Dr. Angela De Bonis
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Università degli Studi della Basilicata, Dipartimento di Scienze, Potenza, Italy
Interests: thin films and nanotechnology; thin film deposition; optics; laser; solid state physics; physical chemistry; experimental physics; plasma; Raman spectroscopy; femtosecond lasers laser ablation; ultrashort lasers; pulsed laser deposition; laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy; laser ablation in liquids; SERS Photo:
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Pulsed laser ablation has already proved to be a versatile and powerful way for the preparation of a great variety of materials. This method has been shown to be suitable not only to deposit thin films (PLD), often maintaining stoichiometry and properties of bulk targets, but also in order to obtain products with peculiar properties that in some cases are quite different from those of the starting material. Indeed, apart from PLD, laser ablation performed in liquid media (PLAL) is corrently used as a simple and clean method  to produce nanoparticles (NPs) and nanostructures. In recent years, the use of high-repetition-rate ultrashort pulse lasers to modify and functionalize the surfaces of bulk materials and thin films has opened a new field of possible applications ranging from electronics to biomimetic materials.

The topics of interest to this Special Issue include but are not limited to the following:

  • ns and fs PLD of thin films of materials for biological applications;
  • ns and fs PLD of thin films of ceramic materials and of protective coatings;
  • Applications of PLD to materials in the field of energy storage;
  • Multilayered films produced by PLD;
  • Mixed deposition tecniques including PLD;
  • NPs and nanostructures produced by PLAL;
  • Laser produced NPS for plasmonic applications;
  • Laser production of NPs and thin films for SERS applications;
  • Doping of glasses by metallic NPs produced by laser tecniques;
  • Surface modification and patterning by fs ablation.
Prof. Roberto Teghil
Prof. Angela De Bonis
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Coatings is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Pulsed laser deposition
  • Pulsed laser ablation in liquids
  • Laser surface modifications
  • Multilayered films produced by PLD.

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

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Article
Analysis of Direct Optical Ablation and Sequent Thermal Ablation for the Ultrashort Pulsed Laser Photo-Thermal Micromachining
Coatings 2020, 10(12), 1151; https://doi.org/10.3390/coatings10121151 - 25 Nov 2020
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 511
Abstract
An ultra-fast pulsed laser for materials processing can obtain submicrometer- to nanometer-sized parts or patterns (precision or accuracy) because the heat cannot diffuse in time for an ultra-fast pulsed duration, and this causes a threshold of ablation in multi-photoabsorption. The optical and thermal [...] Read more.
An ultra-fast pulsed laser for materials processing can obtain submicrometer- to nanometer-sized parts or patterns (precision or accuracy) because the heat cannot diffuse in time for an ultra-fast pulsed duration, and this causes a threshold of ablation in multi-photoabsorption. The optical and thermal effects significantly affect the processing quality of an ultrashort pulsed laser for materials. This study utilizes a Laplace transform method to display the optical and thermal effects on the temperature field and the ablated depth of an ultrashort pulsed laser processing of materials. The results reveal that If an ultrafast pulsed laser-induced heat can keep the irradiated region above the evaporated temperature until the thermal diffusion occurs in the lattice of materials, thermal ablation occurs. The optical ablation can get a better processing quality due to less thermal diffusion. This study theoretically elucidates that the depth of optical ablation approximates the product of an optical absorption length and the logarithm of the ratio of laser fluence to laser fluence threshold. It has also been shown that the optical and thermal ablation, respectively, occur in low and high laser fluence because the optical ablation depends directly on the main source of the incident ultrashort pulsed laser. However, the thermal ablation is determined by the residual heat directly from the incident ultrashort pulsed laser after the optical ablation. The increase rate of the ablated depth per pulse with laser fluence is actually lower at high laser fluences than that at low laser fluences because the thermal ablation using the residual heat directly from the incident ultrashort pulsed laser is governed at high laser fluences. This study will provide the closed-form of a solution that elucidate the direct optical ablation and sequent thermal ablation for the ultra-fast pulsed laser photo-thermal processing. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Pulsed Laser Ablation Techniques)
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Article
The Microstructure, Mechanical and Friction-Wear Properties of (TiBx/TiSiyCz)x3 Multilayer Deposited by PLD on Steel
Coatings 2020, 10(7), 621; https://doi.org/10.3390/coatings10070621 - 29 Jun 2020
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 871
Abstract
The microstructure, mechanical properties, and friction-wear performance of (TiBx/TiSiyCz)x3 multilayer coatings deposited on the M2 steel by the pulsed laser deposition are investigated in detail in as-deposited state and after annealing at 500 °C for 5 min [...] Read more.
The microstructure, mechanical properties, and friction-wear performance of (TiBx/TiSiyCz)x3 multilayer coatings deposited on the M2 steel by the pulsed laser deposition are investigated in detail in as-deposited state and after annealing at 500 °C for 5 min in air. Scanning and transmission electron microscopies are used to reveal microstructural changes caused by annealing. The influence of post-deposition annealing on hardness and Young modulus is studied in nanoindentation test. A scratch-test is applied to reveal changes in adhesion and the coefficient of friction (CoF) of coated samples with diamond before and after annealing. Friction-wear properties are also analyzed in dry sliding with Al2O3 and 100Cr6 steel in ball-on-disc tests. Our analysis shows that the post-deposition annealing leads to partial devitrification of the TiBx layers, where nanocrystalline TiB2 phase is identified, while the TiSiyCz layers retain amorphous. Annealing significantly increases mechanical properties of coated samples and adhesion of the (TiBx/TiSiyCz)x3 multilayer to steel substrates. Friction-wear properties of coated samples are also notably improved. The values of CoF for coated samples tested with diamond (in the scratch-test), alumina, and 100Cr6 steel (ball-on-disc tests) are in the range of 0.05–0.23, while for M2 steel the CoF values are 0.8, 0.45, and 0.8, respectively. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Pulsed Laser Ablation Techniques)
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Article
Femtosecond Pulsed Laser Deposition of Chromium Diboride-Rich Thin Films
Coatings 2019, 9(12), 777; https://doi.org/10.3390/coatings9120777 - 21 Nov 2019
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 913
Abstract
Chromium borides are promising candidates for several structural applications including protective coatings for materials exposed to corrosive and abrasive environments. In this paper the pulsed laser deposition of chromium diboride-rich thin films has been carried out in vacuum by using a frequency doubled [...] Read more.
Chromium borides are promising candidates for several structural applications including protective coatings for materials exposed to corrosive and abrasive environments. In this paper the pulsed laser deposition of chromium diboride-rich thin films has been carried out in vacuum by using a frequency doubled Nd:glass laser with a pulse duration of 250 fs. The films have been deposited at different substrate temperatures and characterized by X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. Lastly, the film’s hardness has been studied by Vickers indentation technique. The results indicate that only the films deposited at a substrate temperature of 500 °C are crystalline and formed by chromium diboride, together with a certain amount of boron and chromium, which suggests that, as main mechanism, a process taking place on the surface from atoms and ions from the gas phase. This hypothesis has been confirmed by the study of the plasma produced by the ablation process. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Pulsed Laser Ablation Techniques)
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Review

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Review
Ultra-Short Pulsed Laser Deposition of Oxides, Borides and Carbides of Transition Elements
Coatings 2020, 10(5), 501; https://doi.org/10.3390/coatings10050501 - 23 May 2020
Cited by 11 | Viewed by 1721
Abstract
Oxides, borides and carbides of the transition elements are materials of great interest from a technologic point of view. Many of these materials are used in the form of thin films, so several techniques are commonly used to deposit them. Among these techniques, [...] Read more.
Oxides, borides and carbides of the transition elements are materials of great interest from a technologic point of view. Many of these materials are used in the form of thin films, so several techniques are commonly used to deposit them. Among these techniques, Pulsed Laser Deposition (PLD) performed using ultra-short pulse lasers, mainly fs lasers, presents unique characteristics in respect to PLD performed using conventional short pulse lasers. Indeed, the films deposited using fs PLD are often nanostructured, and this technique often allows the target stoichiometry to be transferred to the films. In this work, we will review the use of ultra-short PLD in the production of films obtained from transition metal oxides, borides and carbides, evidencing the advantages offered by this technique, together with the problems arising with some of the studied systems. We conclude that even if ultra-short PLD is surely one of the most important and useful deposition techniques, it also presents limits that cannot be ignored. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Pulsed Laser Ablation Techniques)
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