Special Issue "Food and Beverage Packaging Coatings"

A special issue of Coatings (ISSN 2079-6412).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 September 2015).

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Stefano Farris
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Guest Editor
Department of Food, Environmental and Nutritional Sciences, Packaging Division, Milan State University, via Celoria 2, Milan I-20133, Italy
Fax: +39-0250316672
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The global packaging industry has steadily grown over the recent years, with sales mostly concentrated in Asia, North America, and Western Europe, which together accounted for approximately 80% of the total in value terms. According to recent studies, the segmentation of the market is forecasted to change by 2018, with emerging countries gaining a larger share of the market in North America and Western Europe. The food and beverage sector, in particular, accounts for a large share of global packaging production, with a potential demand growth rate of 3.4%, on average, to 2018. Several reasons drive this growth. Among others, growing urbanization, increased living standards, and personal disposable income in the developing regions play a main role.

The increasing demand for food and beverage packaging materials (especially oil-based plastics) poses serious concerns in terms of environmental impact. Over recent years, several strategies have been undertaken to face the threat associated with the large amount of non-biodegradable plastics dumped into landfills and seas. For example, biodegradable plastics from renewable resources have been considered to be the most promising alternative to plastics of fossil origin. However, high production costs, low performance and, not less important, ethical implications, still hinder the market penetration of bioplastics. Recyclability is similarly deemed as a valid approach for reducing the overall production of plastic packaging materials. However, technical limitations associated with the physicochemical properties of polymers, the economic disadvantages of recycling multi-layer structures and highly contaminated materials, inadequate recycling plants, and lack of incentives invest explain why the only efficient closed loop recycling process for plastics concerns PET bottles.

Of late, coating technology has been proposed as an additional strategy for accomplishing a more rational use of the materials used within the food packaging sector. According to the packaging optimization concept, the use of multifunctional thin layers would allow the replacement of multi-layer and heavy structures, thus reducing the upstream amount of packaging materials, while keeping (or even improving) the functional properties of the final package, so as to pursue the goal of overall shelf life extension. Concurrently, the increasing requirements among consumers for convenience, smaller package sizes, and for minimally processed, fresh, and healthy foods have imposed the necessity of designing highly sophisticated and engineered coatings. To this scope, new chemical pathways, new raw materials (e.g., biopolymers), and non-conventional deposition technologies have been used. Nanotechnology, in particular, paved the way for the development of new architectures and never before seen patterns that eventually yielded nanostructured and nanocomposite coatings with outstanding performances.

This Special Issue of Coatings on “Food and Beverage Packaging Coatings” is intended to cover original research articles as well as critical reviews and perspectives on all aspects related to recent advances in the design and development of coatings for the food and beverage packaging sector (e.g., gas barrier, water vapor barrier, antifog, UV-shield, sealing, and active coatings). Contributions on the potential impact of coatings on environmental issues (e.g., bio-based coating systems, water-based formulations, and recycling of coated materials) are particularly welcome.

Dr. Stefano Farris
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Coatings is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.


Keywords

  • biopolymer coatings
  • environmental impact
  • functional barrier
  • multifunctional coatings
  • nanocomposite coatings
  • nanostructured coatings
  • oxygen barrier coatings
  • packaging optimization
  • shelf life extension

Published Papers (8 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle
Antimicrobial Performance of Two Different Packaging Materials on the Microbiological Quality of Fresh Salmon
Coatings 2016, 6(1), 6; https://doi.org/10.3390/coatings6010006 - 27 Jan 2016
Cited by 8
Abstract
In the present research the antimicrobial activity of two active packaging materials on the spoilage microbiota of fresh salmon fillets was tested. A PET-coated film (PET: Polyethylene Terephthalate) containing lysozyme and lactoferrin was tested in parallel with a carvacrol-coextruded multilayer film. Salmon fillet [...] Read more.
In the present research the antimicrobial activity of two active packaging materials on the spoilage microbiota of fresh salmon fillets was tested. A PET-coated film (PET: Polyethylene Terephthalate) containing lysozyme and lactoferrin was tested in parallel with a carvacrol-coextruded multilayer film. Salmon fillet samples were stored up to four days at 0 and 5 °C, comparatively. The carvacrol multilayer film was found effective in preventing mesophiles and psychrotrophs at shorter storage time and at lower temperature (4.0 compared to 5.0 log CFU/g in the control sample—CFU: Colony Forming Units). Lysozyme/lactoferrin-coated PET was instead efficient in decreasing H2S-producing bacteria at longer storage time and higher temperature (2.7 instead of 4.7 log CFU/g in the control sample). Even if is not intended as a way to “clean” a contaminated food product, an active package solution can indeed contribute to reducing the microbial population in food items, thus lowering the risk of food-related diseases. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Food and Beverage Packaging Coatings)
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Open AccessArticle
Development of Antibacterial Composite Films Based on Isotactic Polypropylene and Coated ZnO Particles for Active Food Packaging
Coatings 2016, 6(1), 4; https://doi.org/10.3390/coatings6010004 - 22 Jan 2016
Cited by 15
Abstract
This study was aimed at developing new films based on isotactic polypropylene (iPP) for food packaging applications using zinc oxide (ZnO) with submicron dimension particles obtained by spray pyrolysis. To improve compatibility with iPP, the ZnO particles were coated with stearic acid (ZnOc). [...] Read more.
This study was aimed at developing new films based on isotactic polypropylene (iPP) for food packaging applications using zinc oxide (ZnO) with submicron dimension particles obtained by spray pyrolysis. To improve compatibility with iPP, the ZnO particles were coated with stearic acid (ZnOc). Composites based on iPP with 2 wt % and 5 wt % of ZnOc were prepared in a twin-screw extruder and then filmed by a calender. The effect of ZnOc on the properties of iPP were assessed and compared with those obtained in previous study on iPP/ZnO and iPP/iPPgMA/ZnO. For all composites, a homogeneous distribution and dispersion of ZnOc was obtained indicating that the coating with stearic acid of the ZnO particles reduces the surface polarity mismatch between iPP and ZnO. The iPP/ZnOc composite films have relevant antibacterial properties with respect to E. coli, higher thermal stability and improved mechanical and impact properties than the pure polymer and the composites iPP/ZnO and iPP/iPPgMA/ZnO. This study demonstrated that iPP/ZnOc films are suitable materials for potential application in the active packaging field. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Food and Beverage Packaging Coatings)
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Review

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Open AccessReview
Recent Progress in Gas Barrier Thin Film Coatings on PET Bottles in Food and Beverage Applications
Coatings 2015, 5(4), 987-1001; https://doi.org/10.3390/coatings5040987 - 08 Dec 2015
Cited by 14
Abstract
This article presents a short history and the recent advancement of the development of chemical vapor deposition technologies to form thin film gas barrier coatings on PET bottles and other plastic containers in food and beverage containers. Among different gas barrier enhancement technologies, [...] Read more.
This article presents a short history and the recent advancement of the development of chemical vapor deposition technologies to form thin film gas barrier coatings on PET bottles and other plastic containers in food and beverage containers. Among different gas barrier enhancement technologies, coating can show unique performance where relatively high gas barrier enhancement is possible to various gas permeants. In this article, technologically common and different points of the current thin film coating methods in this field are summarized. This article also refers to recent market situations and technological challenges in the Japanese market. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Food and Beverage Packaging Coatings)
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Open AccessReview
Antifungal Edible Coatings for Fresh Citrus Fruit: A Review
Coatings 2015, 5(4), 962-986; https://doi.org/10.3390/coatings5040962 - 04 Dec 2015
Cited by 37
Abstract
According to their origin, major postharvest losses of citrus fruit are caused by weight loss, fungal diseases, physiological disorders, and quarantine pests. Cold storage and postharvest treatments with conventional chemical fungicides, synthetic waxes, or combinations of them are commonly used to minimize postharvest [...] Read more.
According to their origin, major postharvest losses of citrus fruit are caused by weight loss, fungal diseases, physiological disorders, and quarantine pests. Cold storage and postharvest treatments with conventional chemical fungicides, synthetic waxes, or combinations of them are commonly used to minimize postharvest losses. However, the repeated application of these treatments has led to important problems such as health and environmental issues associated with fungicide residues or waxes containing ammoniacal compounds, or the proliferation of resistant pathogenic fungal strains. There is, therefore, an increasing need to find non-polluting alternatives to be used as part of integrated disease management (IDM) programs for preservation of fresh citrus fruit. Among them, the development of novel natural edible films and coatings with antimicrobial properties is a technological challenge for the industry and a very active research field worldwide. Chitosan and other edible coatings formulated by adding antifungal agents to composite emulsions based on polysaccharides or proteins and lipids are reviewed in this article. The most important antifungal ingredients are selected for their ability to control major citrus postharvest diseases like green and blue molds, caused by Penicillium digitatum and Penicillium italicum, respectively, and include low-toxicity or natural chemicals such as food additives, generally recognized as safe (GRAS) compounds, plant extracts, or essential oils, and biological control agents such as some antagonistic strains of yeasts or bacteria. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Food and Beverage Packaging Coatings)
Open AccessReview
Non-Conventional Tools to Preserve and Prolong the Quality of Minimally-Processed Fruits and Vegetables
Coatings 2015, 5(4), 931-961; https://doi.org/10.3390/coatings5040931 - 26 Nov 2015
Cited by 8
Abstract
The main topic of this paper is a focus on some non-conventional tools to preserve the microbiological and physico-chemical quality of fresh-cut fruits and vegetables. The quality of fresh-cut foods is the result of a complex equilibrium involving surface microbiota, storage temperature, gas [...] Read more.
The main topic of this paper is a focus on some non-conventional tools to preserve the microbiological and physico-chemical quality of fresh-cut fruits and vegetables. The quality of fresh-cut foods is the result of a complex equilibrium involving surface microbiota, storage temperature, gas in the headspace and the use of antimicrobials. This paper proposes a short overview of some non-conventional approaches able to preserve the quality of this kind of product, with a special focus on some new ways, as follows: (1) use of edible or antimicrobial-containing coatings (e.g., chitosan-based coatings) on fruits or vegetables; (2) alternative modified atmospheres (e.g., high O2-modified atmosphere packaging (MAP)) or the use of essential oils in the headspace; (3) conditioning solutions with antimicrobials or natural compounds for fruit salad; and (4) biopreservation and use of a probiotic coating. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Food and Beverage Packaging Coatings)
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Open AccessReview
Natural Pectin Polysaccharides as Edible Coatings
Coatings 2015, 5(4), 865-886; https://doi.org/10.3390/coatings5040865 - 16 Nov 2015
Cited by 20
Abstract
The most fashionable trends in food packaging research are targeted towards improvements in food quality and safety by increasing the use of environmentally-friendly materials, ideally those able to be obtained from bio-based resources and presenting biodegradable characteristics. Edible films represent a key area [...] Read more.
The most fashionable trends in food packaging research are targeted towards improvements in food quality and safety by increasing the use of environmentally-friendly materials, ideally those able to be obtained from bio-based resources and presenting biodegradable characteristics. Edible films represent a key area of development in new multifunctional materials by their character and properties to effectively protect food with no waste production. The use of edible films should be considered as a clean and elegant solution to problems related with waste disposal in packaging materials. In particular, pectin has been reported as one of the main raw materials to obtain edible films by its natural abundance, low cost and renewable character. The latest innovations in food packaging by the use of pectin-based edible films are reviewed in this paper, with special focus on the use of pectin as base material for edible coatings. The structure, properties related to the intended use in food packaging and main applications of pectins are herein reported. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Food and Beverage Packaging Coatings)
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Open AccessReview
Active Packaging Coatings
Coatings 2015, 5(4), 771-791; https://doi.org/10.3390/coatings5040771 - 06 Nov 2015
Cited by 27 | Correction
Abstract
Active food packaging involves the packaging of foods with materials that provide an enhanced functionality, such as antimicrobial, antioxidant or biocatalytic functions. This can be achieved through the incorporation of active compounds into the matrix of the commonly used packaging materials, or by [...] Read more.
Active food packaging involves the packaging of foods with materials that provide an enhanced functionality, such as antimicrobial, antioxidant or biocatalytic functions. This can be achieved through the incorporation of active compounds into the matrix of the commonly used packaging materials, or by the application of coatings with the corresponding functionality through surface modification. The latter option offers the advantage of preserving the packaging materials’ bulk properties nearly intact. Herein, different coating technologies like embedding for controlled release, immobilization, layer-by-layer deposition, and photografting are explained and their potential application for active food packaging is explored and discussed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Food and Beverage Packaging Coatings)
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Other

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Open AccessCorrection
Correction: Bastarrachea, L.J., et al. Active Packaging Coatings. Coatings 2015, 5, 771–791
Coatings 2016, 6(2), 23; https://doi.org/10.3390/coatings6020023 - 08 Jun 2016
Cited by 2
Abstract
The authors wish to make the following correction to this paper [1]:[...] Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Food and Beverage Packaging Coatings)
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