Special Issue "Research Progress on the Interaction of Metal Ions with Colloids and Surfaces"

A special issue of Coatings (ISSN 2079-6412). This special issue belongs to the section "Environmental Aspects in Colloid and Interface Science".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (10 October 2021) | Viewed by 3242

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Ioannis Pashalidis
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Environmental & Radioanalytical Chemistry Lab, Department of Chemistry, University of Cyprus, P.O. Box 20537, Nicosia 1678, Cyprus
Interests: (radio)toxic inorganic species; bioactive chelating ligands; natural organic matter; metal oxides; mineral surfaces; lanthanides; actinides; humic acids; biomass by-products; pollutant monitoring on ground and sea waters; water purification; plant fibres
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Investigations on the interaction of metal ions and other chemical compounds with colloids and surfaces are of particular interest and fundamental in order to understand and describe their chemical behavior and migration in the geosphere, and to develop efficient adsorption-based methods for the removal and recovery of precious and industrial metals from process and waste waters. The mobility and retardation of metals and other compounds in the geosphere strongly depends on the stability of their colloid and mineral surface complexes, respectively. On the other hand, the adsorption of metals and other pollutants by adsorbent materials including metal oxides, minerals, nano and composite materials, MOFs, biomasses, and carbon/biochar has attracted the attention of the research community for the development of efficient adsorbent systems in order to cover the steadily increasing demand for metals used in energy and environmental applications, and to design cost-effective water treatment procedures.

Although the number of publications related to the interaction of metal ions and other chemical compounds with colloids and surfaces has exponentially increased in the last several decades, there is still room for further investigations regarding secondary surface reactions (e.g., redox reactions, decomposition, surface polymerization, and precipitation) and speciation that occur at the solid–liquid interphase, the application of theoretical models to better describe (where possible at the molecular level) the surface chemistry, the development of adsorbents with enhanced capacity and selectivity towards specific species, and the preparation of low-cost and efficient adsorbents in “real” systems.

In this context, the Special Issue ‘‘Research Progress on the Interaction of Metal Ions and other Chemical Compounds with Colloids and Surfaces’’ invites reviews and/or research articles on novel studies related to the adsorption of metals/metalloids and other chemical substances (e.g., dyes, pesticides, pharmaceutical compounds, etc.) by colloids, minerals, nanomaterials and composites, carbon-based, and biochar materials, including their preparation and characterization.

Prof. Ioannis Pashalidis
Dr. Ioannis Anastopoulos
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Coatings is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • colloids
  • surfaces
  • adsorbents
  • chemical compounds
  • metals/metalloids
  • recovery
  • speciation
  • adsorption modeling

Published Papers (3 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Article
Investigations on the Interaction of EDTA with Calcium Silicate Hydrate and Its Impact on the U(VI) Sorption
Coatings 2021, 11(9), 1037; https://doi.org/10.3390/coatings11091037 - 28 Aug 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 616
Abstract
The interaction of EDTA with calcium silicate hydrate (C-S-H) and its impact on the sorption of U(VI) by C-S-H in the presence of EDTA at varying concentrations has been investigated under N2 and ambient atmosphere. The solid phase characterization was performed by [...] Read more.
The interaction of EDTA with calcium silicate hydrate (C-S-H) and its impact on the sorption of U(VI) by C-S-H in the presence of EDTA at varying concentrations has been investigated under N2 and ambient atmosphere. The solid phase characterization was performed by FTIR, XRD and TGA measurements and the uranium concentration in solution has been determined by alpha-spectroscopy. At increased EDTA concentrations ([EDTA] > 0.1 M) calcium is complexed and extensively extracted from the solid resulting in a quantitative dissolution of the Ca(OH)2 phase and deterioration of C-S-H. At lower EDTA concentrations ([EDTA] ≤ 0.01 M), EDTA is sorbed into the solid phase and the associated adsorption capacity (qmax = 0.67 mol/kg) has been evaluated by fitting the corresponding data with the Langmuir isotherm model. The incorporation of EDTA in the C-S-H matrix was corroborated by FTIR, XRD and TGA measurements. Regarding the effect of EDTA on the U(VI) sorption by C-S-H, evaluation of the experimental data reveal a significant decrease of the Kd values in the presence of EDTA most probably due to the stabilization of U(VI) in the form of U(VI)-EDTA complexes in solution. Under ambient conditions a further decrease of the Kd values is observed because of the formation of U(VI)-carbonato complexes related to CO2 dissolution and hydrolysis. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Article
Recovery of Pd(II) from Aqueous Solution by Polyethylenimine-Crosslinked Chitin Biosorbent
Coatings 2021, 11(5), 593; https://doi.org/10.3390/coatings11050593 - 18 May 2021
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 760
Abstract
This study reports the recovery of Pd(II) from acid solution by a polyethylenimine (PEI)-crosslinked chitin (PEI-chitin) biosorbent. FE-SEM analysis demonstrated that there are many slot-like pores on PEI-chitin. The N2 adsorption–desorption experiment revealed that the average pore size was 47.12 nm. Elemental [...] Read more.
This study reports the recovery of Pd(II) from acid solution by a polyethylenimine (PEI)-crosslinked chitin (PEI-chitin) biosorbent. FE-SEM analysis demonstrated that there are many slot-like pores on PEI-chitin. The N2 adsorption–desorption experiment revealed that the average pore size was 47.12 nm. Elemental analysis verified the successful crosslinking of PEI with raw chitin. The Langmuir model better explained the isotherm experimental data and the theoretical maximum Pd(II) uptake was 57.1 mg/g. The adsorption kinetic data were better described by the pseudo-second-order model and the adsorption equilibrium was achieved within 30 min for all initial Pd(II) concentrations of 50–200 mg/L. In the fixed-bed column, the adsorption of Pd(II) on PEI-chitin showed a slow breakthrough and a fast saturation performance. The desorption experiments achieved a concentration factor of 8.4 ± 0.4; in addition, the adsorption–desorption cycles in the fixed-bed column were performed up to three times, consequently confirming the good reusability of PEI-chitin for Pd(II) recovery. Therefore, the PEI-chitin can be used as a promising biosorbent for the recovery of Pd(II) in practical applications. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Article
Comparison of Heavy Metals Removal from Aqueous Solution by Moringa oleifera Leaves and Seeds
Coatings 2021, 11(5), 508; https://doi.org/10.3390/coatings11050508 - 25 Apr 2021
Cited by 9 | Viewed by 1141
Abstract
In this work, biomass obtained from seeds (S-MO) and leaves (L-MO) of the Moringa oleifera plant were used as low-cost biosorbents to remove the Pb(II), Cd(II), Co(II), and Ni(II) from aqueous solutions. The biosorption of the heavy metal ions was done using the [...] Read more.
In this work, biomass obtained from seeds (S-MO) and leaves (L-MO) of the Moringa oleifera plant were used as low-cost biosorbents to remove the Pb(II), Cd(II), Co(II), and Ni(II) from aqueous solutions. The biosorption of the heavy metal ions was done using the batch technique. The effects of contact time (30–1440 min), biosorbent dosage (10–50 g/L) (0.1–0.5 g), and initial concentration of metals (10–500 mg/L) on the sorption capacity of metal ions were investigated. The S-MO and L-MO samples’ characterization was performed using pHpzc, X-ray Diffraction (XRD), and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR). It was found that the pHpzc was notably different between the seeds and leave-derived biosorbents. The removal process’s experimental kinetic data for both S-MO and L-MO were best described by the pseudo-second-order model for all metal ions, with R2 above 0.997 in all cases. Langmuir and Freundlich’s models were also used to analyze the isotherms parameters. Based on the Langmuir model, the maximum sorption capacities (Qm) for L-MO were found as follows: L-MO-Pb > L-MO-Cd > L-MO-Co ≥ L-MO-Ni, and for S-MO, the values of Qm values presented the following order: S-MO-Pb > S-MO-Co > S-MO-Cd > S-MO-Ni. Full article
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

Back to TopTop