Special Issue "Regional Climate Modelling"

A special issue of Climate (ISSN 2225-1154).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 June 2019).

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Mário Gonzalez Pereira
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Physics, University of Trás-os-Montes and Alto Douro, Quinta de Prados, 5000-801 Vila Real, Portugal
Interests: climate dynamics; variability and change; short-term extreme events; influence weather and climate on wildfire; ecosystems; food production; water quality and resources

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Regional Climate Modelling (RCM) is a dynamical downscaling technique for weather and climate simulations at high spatial (and temporal) resolutions. In essence, RCM is performed with Regional Climate Models (RCMs) which are global climate models (GCMs), but with higher spatial resolutions. RCMs are then able to take into account smaller scale features, short-duration events, and other components/processes of the climate system in order to generate spatially-detailed and comprehensive climate data and high-resolution regional climate projections.

RCM have been used for dynamical downscaling for about three decades and the during this period, several developments have been noticed, including coupling with other models, increased resolution and complexity. Consequently, multi-decadal and centennial RCM simulations have emerged, while coordinated experiments and ensembles have become widespread.

Nevertheless, long and very high-resolution RCMs runs are very recent and still rather few in number, while simulations are still affected by errors and uncertainty. However, a higher resolution tends to increase model skill and the added value of RCM is incontestable.

This Special Issue aims to contribute to the state-of-the-art of RCM and welcomes review and original studies. Topics of interest include, but are not limited, to the following:

  • Underlying principles and climate processes studies
  • Weather and climate models’ developments, evaluation and (inter)comparison
  • Weather forecasting and climate projection techniques
  • Model limitations, robustness, errors, predictability and uncertainty
  • Error assessment and correction
  • Modelling extreme climate events
  • Past climate and future scenarios simulations
  • RCMs future challenges and prospects

Dr. Mário Gonzalez Pereira
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Climate is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Published Papers (1 paper)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Open AccessArticle
Modeling Hydrological Response to Climate Change in a Data-Scarce Glacierized High Mountain Astore Basin Using a Fully Distributed TOPKAPI Model
Climate 2019, 7(11), 127; https://doi.org/10.3390/cli7110127 - 28 Oct 2019
Abstract
Water scarcity is influencing environmental and socio-economic development on a global scale. Pakistan is ranked third among the countries facing water scarcity. This situation is currently generating intra-provincial water disputes and could lead to transboundary water conflicts. This study assessed the future water [...] Read more.
Water scarcity is influencing environmental and socio-economic development on a global scale. Pakistan is ranked third among the countries facing water scarcity. This situation is currently generating intra-provincial water disputes and could lead to transboundary water conflicts. This study assessed the future water resources of Astore basin under representative concentration pathways (RCP) 4.5 and 8.5 scenarios using fully distributed TOPographic Kinematic APproximation and Integration (TOPKAPI) model. TOPKAPI model was calibrated and validated over five years from 1999–2003 with a Nash coefficient ranging from 0.93–0.97. Towards the end of the 21st century, the air temperature of Astore will increase by 3°C and 9.6 °C under the RCP4.5 and 8.5 scenarios, respectively. The rise in air temperature can decrease the snow cover with Mann Kendall trend of –0.12%/yr and –0.39%/yr (p ≥ 0.05) while annual discharge projected to be increased 11% (p ≤ 0.05) and 37% (p ≥ 0.05) under RCP4.5 and RCP8.5, respectively. Moreover, the Astore basin showed a different pattern of seasonal shifts, as surface runoff in summer monsoon season declined further due to a reduction in precipitation. In the spring season, the earlier onset of snow and glacier melting increased the runoff due to high temperature, regardless of the decreasing trend of precipitation. This increased surface runoff from snow/glacier melt of Upper Indus Basin (UIB) can potentially be utilized to develop water policy and planning new water harvesting and storage structures, to reduce the risk of flooding. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Regional Climate Modelling)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop