Interactions between Climate Science and Education

A special issue of Climate (ISSN 2225-1154).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 September 2023) | Viewed by 15626

Special Issue Editors

Department of Mathematics and Science Education of Salamanca University, 37008 Salamanca, Spain
Interests: climate change education; climate competence; research methods in social science; data visualization
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Department of Didactics, Organization and Research Methods, University of Salamanca, 37008 Salamanca, Spain
Interests: school effectiveness; climate competence; research methods in education; educational assessment
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Department of Mathematics and Science Education of Salamanca University, 37008 Salamanca, Spain
Interests: climate change education; ultrafast optics
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

We invite you to contribute to the Special Issue “Interactions between Climate Science and Education”, which will be published by Climate.

During the last 10 years we have witnessed alarming climate records and numerous examples of how climate change affects our societies. We need to investigate from a multidisciplinary perspective how it affects the social system and expose evidence of these interactions.

Although a large number of studies are advancing in this direction, we believe that there is a need to address the correlations between climate and education.

Education is a fundamental right, but educational systems, their infrastructure, students and school communities are and will be affected by the climate crisis. A recent study exposes the correlation between heat exposure and the rate of skill formation, and it shows that the rate of learning decreases as the number of hot days grows. The camp fire of 2018 in California resulted in the loss of more than 80 lives, but it also destroyed schools and students’ homes, and due to the smoke, many schools had to be closed, subsequently impacting 1.1 million students. Hurricane Maria of 2017 destroyed a large portion of the scholar infrastructure in Puerto Rico, and children were moved to different states in the USA, significantly impacting the lives of the students and their families. These are examples of how climate is affecting education in a fundamental way.

While the importance of education as a fundamental tool to increase awareness and preparedness is well recognized and studied, we need to investigate further the impact of climate on education.

This issue will focus on studies regarding how to use earth, atmospheric and climate sciences to improve climate change education and how climate change is impacting the educational systems and their communities around the world.

Dr. Enzo Ferrari
Dr. Fernando Martínez-Abad
Dr. Camilo Ruiz
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Climate is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Climate change
  • Education
  • Climate
  • Correlation
  • Association

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

18 pages, 284 KiB  
Article
Secondary School Students’ Perceptions and Concerns on Sustainability and Climate Change
Climate 2024, 12(2), 17; https://doi.org/10.3390/cli12020017 - 28 Jan 2024
Viewed by 832
Abstract
This research is framed in Education for Sustainability, aimed at promoting the inclusion of the principles and values of Sustainability in education from a holistic perspective. The study focuses on finding out the concerns and knowledge of secondary school students from Valencia (Spain), [...] Read more.
This research is framed in Education for Sustainability, aimed at promoting the inclusion of the principles and values of Sustainability in education from a holistic perspective. The study focuses on finding out the concerns and knowledge of secondary school students from Valencia (Spain), who were surveyed during the academic years 2019–2020, 2020–2021 and 2021–2022 about Sustainability and Climate Change. Examining their conceptions, initial ideas, possible shortcomings, and conceptual errors is necessary to build a teaching itinerary with the purpose of adapting and reorienting educational practice to changing situations and different social contexts. The analysis, which is part of a broader research project, focuses on studying what secondary school students know (or rather, what they do not know or are unaware of) about Sustainability and Climate Change, examining their interests and concerns. Our experimental design is based on a wide-ranging questionnaire addressed to students that also promotes initial reflections. The results show that the participating students are concerned about socio-environmental problems, particularly about Climate Change. Nevertheless, they show a limited knowledge of Sustainability. This situation must encourage the involvement of the whole educational community to achieve a greater understanding of the planetary crisis through Education for Sustainability with the final goal of ensuring an effective involvement of the younger generations who are beginning to make their own decisions. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Interactions between Climate Science and Education)
17 pages, 6180 KiB  
Article
Impact of Escalating Heat Waves on Students’ Well-Being and Overall Health: A Survey of Primary School Teachers
Climate 2023, 11(6), 126; https://doi.org/10.3390/cli11060126 - 07 Jun 2023
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 13587
Abstract
Children in developing countries such as India will experience severe consequences of climate change. Primary school students, in particular, are the most vulnerable to extreme weather conditions, such as heat waves intensifying due to climate change. This will adversely impair their development, well-being, [...] Read more.
Children in developing countries such as India will experience severe consequences of climate change. Primary school students, in particular, are the most vulnerable to extreme weather conditions, such as heat waves intensifying due to climate change. This will adversely impair their development, well-being, and learning outcomes. However, significant research gaps exist in understanding and mitigating children’s vulnerabilities. There is an urgent need for a deeper understanding of the impact of heat waves on children’s health and well-being in India. Further, the discussion on the state of heat safety in Indian primary schools is limited. This study addresses these gaps by surveying 335 primary school teachers in seven Indian cities. The data gathered from the field survey offers a better understanding of classroom experiences and challenges encountered by children and teachers during heat waves. It underscores several aspects of students’ vulnerability to heat exposure and its adverse impact on their health, such as absence from school, physical symptoms of heat distress, etc. Furthermore, it highlights the pressing need for classroom heat risk management in light of climate change and makes several policy prescriptions in primary schools. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Interactions between Climate Science and Education)
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