Special Issue "Understanding and Mitigating Urban Heat Island-Remote Sensing and GIS Technologies"

A special issue of Climate (ISSN 2225-1154).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 January 2018).

Special Issue Editors

Assoc. Prof. Man Sing Wong
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
ZS616, Block Z, Department of Land Surveying and Geo-Informatics, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University
Tel. (852) 3400-8959
Interests: urban heat island effect; urban environmental quality; landslides; vegetation and ecosystems; spectral mixture analysis; aerosol retrieval; air quality monitoring; water vapor retrieval
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. Rui Zhu
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Land Surveying and Geo-Informatics, Hong Kong Polytechnic, Hong Kong
Interests: urban heat island; spatio-temporal data modeling; urban mobility; intelligent transportation system; big-data analysis

Special Issue Information

The urban heat island (UHI) effect is an environmental phenomenon in which temperatures (e.g. land surface temperatures, near surface air temperatures, or atmospheric boundary layer temperatures) in the urban area are significantly higher than those in nearby rural areas. Much evidence has proved that it can cause several adverse effects to the society, such as increased energy consumption.

This special issue aims to report the most recent studies from modeling dynamic evolutions of UHIs (e.g. anthropogenic heat flux modeling and 3D solar radiation estimation) for better understanding the formation mechanism to the investigation of methods for mitigating this phenomenon. We warmly welcome original, high quality and unpublished manuscripts which can come from both academia and industry and report different research visions or applications.

Topics of interest include; but are not limited to:

  • Urban heat/sink island
  • Anthropogenic heat
  • 2D/3D Solar radiation
  • Dynamic air flows
  • Land cover changes
  • Urban mobility (such as modeling the heat generated by public transportation through big-data analysis; spatio-temporal data modeling; or spatial data mining)

Keywords

  • urban heat/sink island
  • anthropogenic heat
  • 2D/3D solar radiation
  • dynamic air flows
  • land cover changes
  • urban mobility

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Analysis of the Temperature Changes in the Aburrá Valley between 1995 and 2015 and Modeling Based on Urban, Meteorological and Energetic Parameters
Climate 2018, 6(2), 21; https://doi.org/10.3390/cli6020021 - 23 Mar 2018
Abstract
There is a perception among the inhabitants of the Aburrá Valley Region, that this heavily populated region, which is situated in the Andean mountains of Colombia, has been suffering large temperature elevations in the last years, especially in the last decade. To give [...] Read more.
There is a perception among the inhabitants of the Aburrá Valley Region, that this heavily populated region, which is situated in the Andean mountains of Colombia, has been suffering large temperature elevations in the last years, especially in the last decade. To give perspective about this issue, the authors have gone through the available information about temperature changes in three meteorological stations in the region and have correlated it with a set of variables of urban, climatic, and energetic nature, with the intention of developing an approximate model to understand the temperature changes. Changes in the mean temperature, based on the linear correlation of the data were estimated on 0.47 °C for the 20 years between 1995 and 2015; the study showed that 60% of change was found to be related to local human activities and 40% was attributed to the impact of global warming. For the local influences some practical mitigation actions are proposed, related to better energy management and paying more attention to the temperature changes through improvements in the number and capability of sampling stations in the urban air and in the river, which serve as clear indicators of the changes and the effect of any mitigation measures. Full article
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