Special Issue "Phase Change Materials of Buildings"

A special issue of Buildings (ISSN 2075-5309).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 March 2019).

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Md Morshed Alam
Website
Guest Editor
Lecturer, Swinburne University of Technology, Hawthorn, VIC 3122, Australia
Interests: building information modelling (BIM); building energy and thermal modelling; thermal energy storage; sustainable construction; computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modelling; sustainable building technologies; heatwave resilience in the building
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Climate change and energy scarcity are prompting the adoption of sustainable practices in building sectors around the world. Buildings account for 32% of total global final energy use and 19% of total energy-related greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, making this sector one of the largest users of energy and sources of emissions. The expected population growth to 9.7 billion by mid-century, along with the growing trend of urbanization and the improvement of living standards, will lead to stronger growth in terms of energy consumption in buildings, which would exceed that of the transport and industry sectors.

Improving energy efficiency, in both new and existing buildings, encompasses the most diverse, largest, and most cost-effective energy usage and GHG mitigation opportunities. This Special Issue aims to evaluate the impact of phase change materials (PCM) on building energy and thermal performance. This Special Issue will include but not limit to articles on

  • Various application methods (passive, active, and free cooling) of PCM in both commercial and residential buildings to improve building energy efficiency and thermal comfort,
  • Mitigation of indoor heat stress condition during a heatwave with the application of PCM
  • The barriers and challanges to the adoption of PCM in buildings.

The aim of this Special Issue is to collect and present innovative research results and advancements in the application of phase change materials to improve building energy performance and occupant thermal comfort. 

Dr. Morshed Alam
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Buildings is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Phase Change Materials
  • Building energy efficiency
  • Building simulation
  • Indoor thermal comfort
  • Thermal energy storage
  • Heat stress
  • Barriers and challenges

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Experimental Research on Using Form-stable PCM-Integrated Cementitious Composite for Reducing Overheating in Buildings
Buildings 2019, 9(3), 57; https://doi.org/10.3390/buildings9030057 - 04 Mar 2019
Cited by 2
Abstract
This paper investigates the potential of using form-stable phase change material (FS-PCM) integrated cement mortars in building envelopes to prevent overheating and to improve summer thermal comfort. The FS-PCM integrated cement mortar was applied as the interior surface plastering mortar of a full-scale [...] Read more.
This paper investigates the potential of using form-stable phase change material (FS-PCM) integrated cement mortars in building envelopes to prevent overheating and to improve summer thermal comfort. The FS-PCM integrated cement mortar was applied as the interior surface plastering mortar of a full-scale test hut and compared with identical test huts built on cement plasterboard (OCB) and gypsum plasterboard (GPB). The test huts were exposed to outdoor climatic conditions, and indoor thermal behaviours were continuously monitored throughout the summer period. The effects of PCM in reducing the overheating was analysed by the intensity of thermal discomfort (ITDover) and frequency of thermal discomfort (FTDover) for overheating during the summer days. The comparison between different test huts showed that the application of PCM integrated cement mortars reduced the peak indoor temperature by up to 2.4 °C, compared to GPB and OCB test rooms. More importantly, the analysis of overheating effects revealed that at lower intensive thermal discomfort levels, FS-PCM largely reduces FTDover. As the intensity of thermal discomfort increases, the reduction in ITDover becomes dominant. At highly intensive thermal discomfort levels, the reduction was neither apparent in the intensity of thermal discomfort nor the period of discomfort. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Phase Change Materials of Buildings)
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Open AccessArticle
Thermal Performance of Hollow-Core Slab Ventilation System with Macro-Encapsulated Phase-Change Materials in Supply Air Duct
Buildings 2019, 9(2), 51; https://doi.org/10.3390/buildings9020051 - 22 Feb 2019
Cited by 1
Abstract
The aim of this research was to evaluate the effectiveness of phase-change materials (PCMs) incorporated into the supply air duct of a hollow-core slab ventilation system. Both experimental and numerical approaches were adopted in this investigation. In the experimental work, the air was [...] Read more.
The aim of this research was to evaluate the effectiveness of phase-change materials (PCMs) incorporated into the supply air duct of a hollow-core slab ventilation system. Both experimental and numerical approaches were adopted in this investigation. In the experimental work, the air was passed through a PCM-incorporated aluminum air duct, and the temperature at various points of the duct was recorded. Computational fluid dynamics models of the PCM-incorporated supply air duct and the hollow-core slab were developed and validated with the respective experimental data. The validated models were used to simulate the performance of PCM-incorporated hollow-core slabs during summer in Melbourne, Australia. The results showed that the reduction in temperature fluctuation varied with the way the PCM was incorporated inside the supply air duct. The temperature difference was maximum and was maintained for a longer period when the PCM was spread to all four internal surfaces of the supply air duct. The results also showed that the effectiveness of the combined PCM–air duct–hollow-core slab system in reducing the temperature fluctuation was lower than the individual performance of the PCM–air duct and hollow-core concrete slab for a given inlet temperature condition during the simulated period. This was because the integration of PCMs in the supply air duct resulted in a precooling effect which reduced the difference between the amplitude of slab inlet temperature swing and average slab temperature. As a result, the reduction in temperature fluctuation due to the thermal mass of the hollow-core slab was 21% lower in the presence of PCMs compared to the no-PCM case. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Phase Change Materials of Buildings)
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