Special Issue "Nanomaterials for Historic Buildings"

A special issue of Buildings (ISSN 2075-5309).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 October 2019).

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Noni-Pagona Maravelaki
Website
Guest Editor
School of Architecture, Technical University of Crete, 73100 Chania, Greece
Interests: stone decay and diagnosis; nanomaterials for stone and mortar conservation; conservation materials and techniques
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Prof. Federica Fernandez
Website1 Website2
Guest Editor
I.E.ME.S.T. Euro Mediterranean Institute for Science and Technology
Interests: conservation of cultural heritage and application of innovative technologies; innovative materials for sustainable building construction (green building)

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

MDPI has proposed to edit a Special Issue entitled “Nanomaterials in Historic Buildings”. The ongoing enhanced research activities on promoting the use of nanomaterials in the maintenance of historic buildings established the need for disseminating the invaluable contribution of nanomaterials in this specific field. In this respect, in order to properly highlight the discipline, world-class researchers are invited to contribute their expertise. This Special Issue contributes to recent advances and trends of innovative nanostructured materials for cleaning, consolidation and protection of historic buildings.

Recommended topics to be covered include, but are not limited to the following:

  • Innovative advanced materials as cleaning and protective agents for the conservation of historic buildings
  • Photocatalytic and other self-cleaning nanostructured coatings for historic buildings
  • Mortars and plasters with nano-additives
  • Energy-efficient coatings with nano-materials
  • Energy-efficient paints with nano-materials
  • Advanced hybrid sol-gel coatings for historic buildings
  • Smart cleaning agents for historic buildings
  • Antifungal nanomaterials for historic buildings
  • Anti-graffiti materials for historic buildings
  • Sustainability of advanced nano-materials for conservation of historic buildings

Prof. Pagona Maravelaki
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Buildings is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Cleaning agents
  • Consolidants
  • Protective agents
  • Mortar
  • Plaster
  • Coatings/paints
  • Sol-gel
  • Anti-graffiti
  • Sustainability

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle
Development of Eco-Friendly and Self-Cleaning Lime-Pozzolan Plasters for Bio-Construction and Cultural Heritage
Buildings 2020, 10(10), 172; https://doi.org/10.3390/buildings10100172 - 28 Sep 2020
Abstract
Nowadays, the design and use of multi-functional mortars has increased significantly, with interesting applications in the green building and cultural heritage conservation sectors. A key point for a correct adoption of these innovative materials is their behavior along time and their resistance to [...] Read more.
Nowadays, the design and use of multi-functional mortars has increased significantly, with interesting applications in the green building and cultural heritage conservation sectors. A key point for a correct adoption of these innovative materials is their behavior along time and their resistance to the weathering. The objective of this project was to define the performance and durability of innovative mortars, in order to use them correctly and to avoid irreparable damage over time. For the development of this project, lime–metakaolin and hydraulic lime–metakaolin based mortars (hereinafter called A, B), as well as A and B with the addition of nano-TiO2 and perlite (hereinafter referred to as A+, B+), have been tested. The focus of the work was to carry out preliminary tests to evaluate the performance and durability characteristics of these mortars, verifying their behavior over time through exposure to artificial aging cycles, including thermal shock cycles in saline solution aerosols, freeze cycles in vapor aerosol, and aging by heat treatment at high temperatures. Before and after each artificial aging cycle, weight measurements, and macroscopic and microscopic observations were performed in order to evaluate possible structural changes. The characteristics of the mortars were assessed by determination of the apparent volume mass, mechanical properties, such as compressive and bending strength, water absorption, whereas their self-cleaning capacity was measured by methylene blue degradation test under UV and solar irradiation. The results obtained show degradation effects in the mortar samples due to aging after each test, and indicated that mortars with perlite and nano-TiO2 are the best-performing ones, both from the durability and energetic point of view, rendering them suitable for applications in the green building sector and the conservation of cultural heritage. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanomaterials for Historic Buildings)
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Open AccessArticle
Nano-TiO2 in Hydraulic Lime–Metakaolin Mortars for Restoration Projects: Physicochemical and Mechanical Assessment
Buildings 2019, 9(11), 236; https://doi.org/10.3390/buildings9110236 - 19 Nov 2019
Abstract
In recent years, lime mortars mixed with artificial or natural pozzolans are commonly used in restoration applications. The aim of this work is the assessment of carbonation, pozzolanic reaction, setting time, and mechanical properties of metakaolin–lime mortars mixed with crystalline nano-titania (nT) as [...] Read more.
In recent years, lime mortars mixed with artificial or natural pozzolans are commonly used in restoration applications. The aim of this work is the assessment of carbonation, pozzolanic reaction, setting time, and mechanical properties of metakaolin–lime mortars mixed with crystalline nano-titania (nT) as additive. The studied mortars consist of hydrated lime and metakaolin in 60/40 ratio (wt%) and fine aggregates of either carbonate or silicate sand. The concentration of the nano-titania is equal to 6 (wt%) of the binder. For comparison purposes, three types of mortars and pastes are designed: Without the addition of nano-titania, with nT activated or not under UV irradiation. The evaluation of the carbonation and pozzolanic reaction over a 1.5-year curing period is carried out through thermal analysis (DTA/TG), infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD). The uniaxial compression and the three-point bending tests at 28 days, 3 months, and 6 months were carried out to evaluate mechanical properties. The addition of activated nano-titania, due to an increased photocatalytic activity, accelerated the setting of the mortars, improving at the same time the mechanical properties. The plastic behavior of the lime–metakaolin mortars with activated nT was attributed to the evolution of carbonation and pozzolanic reaction. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanomaterials for Historic Buildings)
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Review

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Open AccessReview
A Review of the Assessment Tools for the Efficiency of Nanolime Calcareous Stone Consolidant Products for Historic Structures
Buildings 2019, 9(11), 235; https://doi.org/10.3390/buildings9110235 - 16 Nov 2019
Cited by 1
Abstract
In the present review paper, the term “effectiveness” of nanolime consolidants was redefined by presenting a suite of efficiency parameters/material properties that must be assessed in order to compare available treatments for weathered calcareous stones for historic buildings. Assessment tools in the form [...] Read more.
In the present review paper, the term “effectiveness” of nanolime consolidants was redefined by presenting a suite of efficiency parameters/material properties that must be assessed in order to compare available treatments for weathered calcareous stones for historic buildings. Assessment tools in the form of characterization methods for synthetized nanolime dispersions, artificial weathering techniques, and treated calcareous stones were correlated and discussed, giving rise to non-destructive testing methods. The effect of the application method and dispersion medium was also presented. It was concluded that the presented suite of efficiency parameters and characterization techniques can be applied to further studies for the development of mass consolidation procedures in order to reach penetration depths well beyond the 5.5 cm threshold achieved up to date. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanomaterials for Historic Buildings)
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