Special Issue "Perspectives of Theoretical Medicine"

A special issue of Biology (ISSN 2079-7737).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 15 September 2020.

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Jacques Demongeot
Website
Guest Editor
Faculty of Medicine, Université Grenoble Alpes, 621 Avenue Centrale, 38400 Saint-Martin-d'Hères, France
Interests: Medical Imaging;io-Informatics;Bio-Modelling;Biological Complexity; Systems Biology
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This special issue publishes research and review articles focused on the application of mathematics to problems arising from the biomedical sciences.

Prof. Jacques Demongeot
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

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Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Footprints of a Singular 22-Nucleotide RNA Ring at the Origin of Life
Biology 2020, 9(5), 88; https://doi.org/10.3390/biology9050088 - 25 Apr 2020
Abstract
(1) Background: Previous experimental observations and theoretical hypotheses have been providing insight into a hypothetical world where an RNA hairpin or ring may have debuted as the primary informational and functional molecule. We propose a model revisiting the architecture of RNA-peptide interactions at [...] Read more.
(1) Background: Previous experimental observations and theoretical hypotheses have been providing insight into a hypothetical world where an RNA hairpin or ring may have debuted as the primary informational and functional molecule. We propose a model revisiting the architecture of RNA-peptide interactions at the origin of life through the evolutionary dynamics of RNA populations. (2) Methods: By performing a step-by-step computation of the smallest possible hairpin/ring RNA sequences compatible with building up a variety of peptides of the primitive network, we inferred the sequence of a singular docosameric RNA molecule, we call the ALPHA sequence. Then, we searched for any relics of the peptides made from ALPHA in sequences deposited in the different public databases. (3) Results: Sequence matching between ALPHA and sequences from organisms among the earliest forms of life on Earth were found at high statistical relevance. We hypothesize that the frequency of appearance of relics from ALPHA sequence in present genomes has a functional necessity. (4) Conclusions: Given the fitness of ALPHA as a supportive sequence of the framework of all existing theories, and the evolution of Archaea and giant viruses, it is anticipated that the unique properties of this singular archetypal ALPHA sequence should prove useful as a model matrix for future applications, ranging from synthetic biology to DNA computing. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Perspectives of Theoretical Medicine)
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