Special Issue "Development and Perspectives of Atomic and Molecular Databases - Series II"

A special issue of Atoms (ISSN 2218-2004).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 December 2022 | Viewed by 1904

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Claudio Mendoza
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Physics Center, Venezuelan Institute for Scientific Research (IVIC), Caracas 1020, Venezuela
Interests: computation of atomic data for astrophysical applications; X-ray astrophysics; astrophysical opacities; high-density effects in plasmas; surface astrochemistry; mathematical and computational biology; scientific databases; scientific data assessment; web data services; data science; student
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Compilations of atomic and molecular (A&M) data are of vital importance in several scientific fields (e.g., astrophysics, astrochemistry, atmospheric physics, and fusion) and in industrial applications dealing with lasers and lighting. Seminal initiatives were the tables of atomic energy levels by Charlotte E. Moore (1949) and of atomic transition probabilities by Wiese, Smith, and Glennon (1966) at the National Bureau of Standards (NBS), now the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). With the advent of the Internet and the World Wide Web, numerous online A&M databases have become available to address an ever-growing demand for accurate and complete datasets. In the present Special Issue of Atoms, we intend to present a comprehensive review of the state, development, and future perspectives of such A&M databases by evaluating their data models; metadata; data collection, curation, and assessment schemes; web services and data transfer protocols; interoperability; and workspaces. We are also interested in the data-user’s point of view by comparing the A&M databases incorporated in plasma modeling codes. We therefore welcome contributions to this timely anthology in the form of reviews, research reports, short communications, and comments.

Dr. Claudio Mendoza
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1500 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • A&M databases
  • data collection
  • data curation
  • data assessment
  • data transfer
  • plasma modeling codes
  • interoperability
  • web services

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Article
Mass Spectra Resulting from Collision Processes
Atoms 2022, 10(2), 56; https://doi.org/10.3390/atoms10020056 - 28 May 2022
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Abstract
A new database and viewer for mass spectra resulting from collision processes is presented that follows the standards of the Virtual Atomic and Molecular Data Centre (VAMDC). A focus was placed on machine read and write access, as well as ease of use. [...] Read more.
A new database and viewer for mass spectra resulting from collision processes is presented that follows the standards of the Virtual Atomic and Molecular Data Centre (VAMDC). A focus was placed on machine read and write access, as well as ease of use. In a browser-based viewer, mass spectra and all parameters related to a given measurement can be shown. The program additionally enables a direct comparison between two mass spectra, either by plotting them on top of each other or their difference to identify subtle variations in the data. Full article
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Article
Superstructure and Distorted-Wave Codes and Their Applications
Atoms 2022, 10(2), 47; https://doi.org/10.3390/atoms10020047 - 06 May 2022
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Abstract
There have been many observations of the solar and astrophysical spectra of various ions. The diagnostics of these observations require atomic data that include energy levels, oscillator strengths, transition rates, and collision strengths. These have been calculated using the Superstructure and Distorted-wave codes. [...] Read more.
There have been many observations of the solar and astrophysical spectra of various ions. The diagnostics of these observations require atomic data that include energy levels, oscillator strengths, transition rates, and collision strengths. These have been calculated using the Superstructure and Distorted-wave codes. We describe calculations for various ions. We calculate intensity ratios and compare them with observations to infer electron densities and temperatures of solar plasmas. Full article
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Article
Atomic Lifetime Data and Databases
Atoms 2022, 10(2), 46; https://doi.org/10.3390/atoms10020046 - 05 May 2022
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Abstract
Atomic-level lifetimes span a wide range, from attoseconds to years, relating to transition energy, multipole order, atomic core charge, relativistic effects, perturbation of atomic symmetries by external fields, and so on. Some parameters permit the application of simple scaling rules, others are sensitive [...] Read more.
Atomic-level lifetimes span a wide range, from attoseconds to years, relating to transition energy, multipole order, atomic core charge, relativistic effects, perturbation of atomic symmetries by external fields, and so on. Some parameters permit the application of simple scaling rules, others are sensitive to the environment. Which results deserve to be tabulated or stored in atomic databases? Which results require high accuracy to give insight into details of the atomic structure? Which data may be useful for the interpretation of plasma experiments or astrophysical observations without any particularly demanding accuracy threshold? Should computation on demand replace pre-fabricated atomic databases? Full article
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