Special Issue "Feeding Cattle for Health Improvement"

A special issue of Animals (ISSN 2076-2615). This special issue belongs to the section "Cattle".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 December 2019

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Prof. Marta I. Miranda Castañón

Departamento de Anatomía, Producción Animal y Ciencias Clínicas Veterinarias. Universidade de Santiago de Compostela, Facultad de Veterinaria. Campus Terra, Lugo, Spain
Website | E-Mail
Interests: cattle; toxic and trace elements; organic farming; conventional farming; cattle medicine
Guest Editor
Prof. Marta López Alonso

Departamento de Patoloxía Animal, Universidade de Santiago de Compostela, Facultad de Veterinaria. Campus Terra, Lugo, Spain
Website | E-Mail
Interests: cattle; toxic and trace elements; organic farming; conventional farming; cattle medicine

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Adequate provision of suitable feed is one of the primary objectives of farmers to ensure the health and performance of their livestock. Nutrition can be modulated to improve growing, production, reproduction, and in general “to improve health”. Adequate nutrition requires knowledge of the nutritional requirements of all components of the diet for the different periods of growing and production. In recent years, many innovations in cattle nutrition have been proposed, and the aim of this Special Issue is to publish original research papers or reviews concerning cattle nutrition (both dairy and beef) and the interrelations between nutrition, health and the environment.

Areas of interest: Nutrient requirements for cattle. The effect of feeding on animal health (growing, reproduction, immunity, udder health, etc.) and quality of their products (meat and milk). Nutrition in different farming systems. Additives and novel ingredients. The effects of feeding on environment.

We invite you to share your recent findings through this Special Issue.

Prof. Marta I. Miranda Castañón
Prof. Marta López Alonso
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Animals is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Cattle
  • Nutrition
  • Heath
  • Milk
  • Meat
  • Feed additives
  • Novel ingredients
  • Environment

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle
Effects of Grazing on the Behaviour, Oxidative and Immune Status, and Production of Organic Dairy Cows
Animals 2019, 9(6), 371; https://doi.org/10.3390/ani9060371
Received: 24 March 2019 / Revised: 7 June 2019 / Accepted: 11 June 2019 / Published: 18 June 2019
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Abstract
This study compared the effects of a short daily grazing time with those of permanent free-stall housing on the behaviour, oxidative status, immune response, and milk production of organically reared cows. During a 63-day period, two homogeneous groups of eight lactating Brown cows [...] Read more.
This study compared the effects of a short daily grazing time with those of permanent free-stall housing on the behaviour, oxidative status, immune response, and milk production of organically reared cows. During a 63-day period, two homogeneous groups of eight lactating Brown cows were allocated to either housing (H) in a free-stall building for 24 h/day. Feeding was based on a total mixed ration or grazing (G) on barley grass for 5 h/day, and housing in a free-stall structure with feeding was based on the same total mixed ration offered to the H group. With regard to behaviour, H cows spent more time idling, walking, drinking, and self-grooming, whereas G cows showed a greater intent to eat and interact socially. Moreover, G cows exhibited slightly higher reactive oxygen metabolites and similar biological antioxidant potential concentrations than the H group, which indicates that short grazing resulted in an almost negligible increase in oxidative stress and an unchanged antioxidant capacity. Skin tests, performed by injecting phytohemoagglutinin intradermally, indicated that G cows had thicker skin than H cows at the end of the trial, an index of a better cell-mediated immune response. Grazing did not affect milk yield but improved milk quality in terms of an increase in fat and a reduction in urea content, somatic cell count, and total microbial count. Milk from G cows was richer in saturated fatty acids, likely because of the contribution of palmitic acid present in the grazed barley grass, and also showed higher contents of some healthy fatty acids, such as rumenic acid and α-linolenic acid, and a lower omega-6/omega-3 ratio. These results show that including a short grazing time in the diets of organic dairy cows does not have negative consequences for milk production and contributes to improved milk quality as well as to a more efficient immune response in the cows. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Feeding Cattle for Health Improvement)
Open AccessArticle
Effect of Feeding Glycerin on Ruminal Environment and In Situ Degradability of Feedstuffs in Young Bulls
Animals 2019, 9(6), 359; https://doi.org/10.3390/ani9060359
Received: 25 April 2019 / Revised: 9 June 2019 / Accepted: 11 June 2019 / Published: 16 June 2019
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Abstract
This work studied the effect of feeding glycerin in bulls that were fed high levels of concentrate on the ruminal environment and in situ degradability of feedstuffs. Four ruminally cannulated young bulls were assigned to a 4 × 4 Latin square arrangement of [...] Read more.
This work studied the effect of feeding glycerin in bulls that were fed high levels of concentrate on the ruminal environment and in situ degradability of feedstuffs. Four ruminally cannulated young bulls were assigned to a 4 × 4 Latin square arrangement of treatments. The diets consisted of 15% barley straw and 85% concentrate in dry matter (DM). There were four different concentrates: without glycerin, and with 20, 40 or 80 g of glycerin per kg of DM. Each diet was offered for 24 days, the ruminal fluid was sampled to evaluate the ruminal metabolism and to determine the ruminal bacterial population by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction analysis, and the in situ degradability of six different feedstuffs was measured. The treatment with the highest level of glycerin provided the lower pH (p < 0.001), and the acetic/propionic molar ratio decreased (p < 0.001) as glycerin increased. The incorporation of glycerin in the diet did not affect the DNA copies/µL of the total bacteria, Butyrivibrio fibrisolvens and Butyrivibrio proteoclasticus (p > 0.05) in the DNA extract of rumen fluid, but at high levels increased Selenomonas ruminantium (p < 0.01). Very few effects of glycerin incorporation were found for the in situ degradability. In young bulls that were fed high levels of concentrate, glycerin at 20 or 40 g/kg of feed could be included without affecting the ruminal pH and raising the propionic acid, but at 80 g/kg the ruminal pH dropped, despite the increase of Selenomonas ruminantium. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Feeding Cattle for Health Improvement)
Open AccessArticle
Environment and Behavior: Neurochemical Effects of Different Diets in the Calf Brain
Animals 2019, 9(6), 358; https://doi.org/10.3390/ani9060358
Received: 15 May 2019 / Revised: 5 June 2019 / Accepted: 12 June 2019 / Published: 14 June 2019
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Abstract
Calves reared for the production of white veal are subjected to stressful events due to the type of liquid diet they receive. Stress responses are mediated by three main stress-responsive cerebral regions: the prefrontal cortex, the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus, and the [...] Read more.
Calves reared for the production of white veal are subjected to stressful events due to the type of liquid diet they receive. Stress responses are mediated by three main stress-responsive cerebral regions: the prefrontal cortex, the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus, and the nucleus of the solitary tract of the brainstem. In the present study, we have investigated the effects of different diets on these brain regions of ruminants using immunohistochemical methods. In this study, 15 calves were used and kept in group housing systems of five calves each. They were fed with three different diets: a control diet, a milk diet, and a weaned diet. Brain sections were immunostained to evaluate the distribution of neuronal nitric oxide synthase and myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein immunoreactivity in the prefrontal cortex; the expression of oxytocin in the paraventricular nucleus; and the presence of c-Fos in the A2 group of the nucleus of the solitary tract. The main results obtained indicate that in weaned diet group the oxytocin activity is lower than in control diet and milk diet groups. In addition, weaning appears to stimulate myelination in the prefrontal cortex. In summary, this study supports the importance of maintaining a nutritional lifestyle similar to that occurring in natural conditions. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Feeding Cattle for Health Improvement)
Open AccessArticle
Effects of Summer Transhumance of Dairy Cows to Alpine Pastures on Body Condition, Milk Yield and Composition, and Cheese Making Efficiency
Animals 2019, 9(4), 192; https://doi.org/10.3390/ani9040192
Received: 15 March 2019 / Revised: 18 April 2019 / Accepted: 22 April 2019 / Published: 24 April 2019
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Abstract
Summer transhumance to alpine pastures (ALP) is widespread in dairy systems of alpine regions. This study aimed to investigate the effects of transhumance of Brown Swiss cows to ALP on the yield, composition, and coagulation properties of milk (MCP), and on cheese yield [...] Read more.
Summer transhumance to alpine pastures (ALP) is widespread in dairy systems of alpine regions. This study aimed to investigate the effects of transhumance of Brown Swiss cows to ALP on the yield, composition, and coagulation properties of milk (MCP), and on cheese yield (CY). The study involved 12 multiparous cows kept at a mountain lowland permanent farm (PF), which were divided into two equal groups: One remained at the PF, the other was moved to the ALP (1860 m above sea level) from July to September. Every month (June to October), daily milk yield (MY) and body condition score (BCS) were recorded, and individual milk samples (n = 60, 2000 mL each) were collected to assess milk composition, MCP, and CY. Compared with PF, ALP cows had a reduced MY and BCS, which was maintained on return to the PF, greater fat and lower protein contents of milk. Neither MCP nor CY were affected by summer transhumance. In conclusion, summer transhumance did not affect the cheese making efficiency of milk but depressed MY and consequently daily cheese yield, which was nearly 2 kg/d lower for the ALP than the PF cows and was only partially recovered after returning to the PF in autumn. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Feeding Cattle for Health Improvement)
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Open AccessBrief Report
Days-in-Milk and Parity Affected Serum Biochemical Parameters and Hormone Profiles in Mid-Lactation Holstein Cows
Animals 2019, 9(5), 230; https://doi.org/10.3390/ani9050230
Received: 21 March 2019 / Revised: 26 April 2019 / Accepted: 7 May 2019 / Published: 10 May 2019
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Abstract
It is well known that serum biochemical parameters and hormones contribute greatly to the physiological and metabolic status of dairy cows. However, few studies have focused on the variation of these serum parameters in multiparous mid-lactation cows without the interference of diet and [...] Read more.
It is well known that serum biochemical parameters and hormones contribute greatly to the physiological and metabolic status of dairy cows. However, few studies have focused on the variation of these serum parameters in multiparous mid-lactation cows without the interference of diet and management. A total of 287 Holstein dairy cows fed the same diet and maintained under the same management regime were selected from a commercial dairy farm to evaluate the effects of days-in-milk (DIM) and parity on serum biochemical parameters and hormone profiles. Milk yield and milk protein content were affected by DIM and parity (p < 0.05). Milk protein yield showed a numerically decreasing trend with parity, and it was relatively constant in cows with parities between 2 and 4 but lower in cows with parity 6 (p = 0.020). Ten and five serum biochemical parameters related to protein status, energy metabolism, liver and kidney function, and oxidative stress were affected by DIM and parity, respectively (p < 0.05). Glucagon, insulin-like growth factor 1 concentration, and the revised quantitative insulin sensitivity check index were significantly different (p < 0.05) among cows with different DIM. Parity had no effect on hormone concentrations. An interaction between DIM and parity effect was only detected for glucagon concentration (p = 0.015), which showed a significantly increasing trend with DIM and overall decreasing trend with parity. In summary, DIM and parity played an important role in affecting the serum biochemical parameters and/or hormones of dairy cows, with serum parameters affected more by DIM than parity. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Feeding Cattle for Health Improvement)
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