Next Article in Journal
Canon, Value, and Cultural Heritage: New Processes of Assigning Value in the Postdigital Realm
Previous Article in Journal
A Study on the Use of Eye Tracking to Adapt Gameplay and Procedural Content Generation in First-Person Shooter Games
Article Menu

Export Article

Open AccessArticle
Multimodal Technologies Interact. 2018, 2(2), 24; https://doi.org/10.3390/mti2020024

Sound Descriptions of Haptic Experiences of Art Work by Deafblind Cochlear Implant Users

1
ISE Research Group, Faculty of Educational Sciences, University of Helsinki, 00100 Helsinki, Finland
2
Fashion/Textile Futures Research Group, Department of Design, Aalto University School of Arts, Design and Architecture, 00560 Helsinki, Finland
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 1 April 2018 / Revised: 24 April 2018 / Accepted: 8 May 2018 / Published: 11 May 2018
Full-Text   |   PDF [1555 KB, uploaded 14 May 2018]   |  

Abstract

Deafblind persons’ perception and experiences are based on their residual auditive and visual senses, and touch. Their haptic exploration, through movements and orientation towards objects give blind persons direct, independent experience. Few studies explore the aesthetic experiences and appreciation of artefacts of deafblind people using cochlear implant (CI) technology, and how they interpret and express their perceived aesthetic experience through another sensory modality. While speech recognition is studied extensively in this area, the aspect of auditive descriptions made by CI users are a less-studied domain. This present research intervention describes and analyses five different deafblind people sharing their interpretation of five statues vocally, using sounds and written descriptions based on their haptic explorations. The participants found new and multimodal ways of expressing their experiences, as well as re-experiencing them through technological aids. We also found that the CI users modify technology to better suit their personal needs. We conclude that CI technology in combination with self-made sound descriptions enhance memorization of haptic art experiences that can be re-called by the recording of the sound descriptions. This research expands the idea of auditive descriptions, and encourages user-produced descriptions as artistic supports to traditional linguistic, audio descriptions. These can be used to create personal auditive–haptic memory collections similar to how sighted create photo albums. View Full-Text
Keywords: haptic experience; deafblindness; technological aids; cochlear implant; aesthetic experience; vocalization as memory haptic experience; deafblindness; technological aids; cochlear implant; aesthetic experience; vocalization as memory
Figures

Figure 1

This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited (CC BY 4.0).
SciFeed

Share & Cite This Article

MDPI and ACS Style

Lahtinen, R.; Groth, C.; Palmer, R. Sound Descriptions of Haptic Experiences of Art Work by Deafblind Cochlear Implant Users. Multimodal Technologies Interact. 2018, 2, 24.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats

Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Metrics

Article Access Statistics

1

Comments

[Return to top]
Multimodal Technologies Interact. EISSN 2414-4088 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top