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Open AccessArticlePost Publication Peer ReviewVersion 2, Revised

Perception to Adaptation of Climate Change in Nepal: An Empirical Analysis Using Multivariate Probit Model (Version 2, Revised)

by Arun GC and Jun-Ho Yeo *
Department of Agricultural Economics, Kyungpook National Univeristy, 80 Daehakro, Daegu, Korea
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 17 February 2019 / Accepted: 25 February 2019 / Published: 20 September 2019
Peer review status: 2nd round review Read review reports

Reviewer 1 Yingming Li game theory; econometric model Reviewer 2 Carlos Rubio-Bellido Universidad de Sevilla | US Architectural II Sevilla, Spain Reviewer 3 Christopher Bryant Adjunct Professor, Geography, University of Montreal, Quebec, Canada & Adjunct Professor, School of Environmental Design and Rural Development, University of Guelph, Ontario, Canada
Version 1
Original
Approved with revisions
Authors' response
Approved with revisions
Authors' response
Approved with revisions
Version 2
Revised
Approved Reviewer invited Reviewer invited
Version 2, Revised
Published: 20 September 2019
DOI: 10.3390/sci1030057
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Version 1, Original
Published: 6 March 2019
DOI: 10.3390/sci1010012.v1
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This study assessed farmers’ perception of climate change, estimated the determinants of, and evaluated the relationship among adaptation practices using the multivariate probit model. A survey in 300 agricultural households was carried out covering 10 sample districts considering five agro-ecological zones and a vulnerability index. Four adaptation choices (change in planting date, crop variety, crop type and investment in irrigation) were deemed as outcome variables and socioeconomic, demographic, institutional, farm-level and perceptions variables were deployed as explanatory variables. Their marginal effects were determined for three climatic variables—temperature, precipitation and drought. Age, gender and education of head of household, credit access, farm area, rain-fed farming and tenure, are found to be more influential compared to other factors. All four adaptation-options are found to be complimentary to each other. Importantly, the intensity of impact of dependent variables in different models, and for available adaptation-options, are found to be unequal. Therefore, policy options and support facilities should be devised according to climatic variables and adaptation options to achieve superior results. View Full-Text
Keywords: adaptation; perception; climate change; Nepal; multivariate probit adaptation; perception; climate change; Nepal; multivariate probit
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MDPI and ACS Style

GC, A.; Yeo, J.-H. Perception to Adaptation of Climate Change in Nepal: An Empirical Analysis Using Multivariate Probit Model. Sci 2019, 1, 57.

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Reviewer 1

Sent on 03 Sep 2019 by Yingming Li | Approved with revisions
game theory; econometric model

Quality of introduction should be improved, for example the relationship between climate change, SDGs, and agriculture is not clearly, just focus on the topic “Climate change is affecting agricultural production”. Literatures review need further improvement, not just “measuring determinants are still relatively scarce [9]. Among them, the majority of studies are focused in Africa [11–15]”. For example, China has done a lot of research on climate change and agriculture, including measuring determinants. https://www.mdpi.com/2071-1050/11/7/1928/pdf Introduction section does not lead to scientific problems very well, and the literature review needs to be strengthened. Detailed description of the process of data collection and sampling should be given. For example, how to ensure random sampling. Description of Fig 1 have some mistakes, please correct. Models description should be added, explain why some variables were controlled, while some were not in other models. Further comparative analysis is needed, including the influencing factors on behaviors among models, and marginal effects.

Response to Reviewer 1

Sent on 04 Jul 2020 by Arun GC, Jun-Ho Yeo

Dear Reviewer Warm Greetings! Thank you very much for your all supports and wonderful review. As you have suggested on your reviewer's comment, We have updated our manuscripts. Specifically, introduction and literature review have been updated. Thank you

Reviewer 2

Sent on 16 Aug 2019 by Carlos Rubio-Bellido | Approved with revisions
Universidad de Sevilla | US Architectural II Sevilla, Spain

Despite the fact that the manuscript is relevant the results must be supported by graphs. These missing information will clarify various conclusions of the paper.

Response to Reviewer 2

Sent on 04 Jul 2020 by Arun GC, Jun-Ho Yeo

Dear Reviewer Warm Greetings We really appreciate your contribution to make our paper much improved. We have tried to improved our manuscript inline with your suggestion. However, we would be glad if we could find any appropriate graphs to insert in results section. Thank you Best Regards

Reviewer 3

Sent on 17 Jan 2020 by Christopher Bryant | Approved with revisions
Adjunct Professor, Geography, University of Montreal, Quebec, Canada & Adjunct Professor, School of Environmental Design and Rural Development, University of Guelph, Ontario, Canada

This is an interesting article. The only real issue is that there are still some improvements in the English that would be useful. But the article is well-structured and the results interesting and useful.

There are many research projects that have investigated agricultural adaptatron to climate change and variability, and it would certainly be useful (not in this article) to make some comparisons between these different research processes.

Farmers' cultures can vary between different countries and even between territories in the same country. We often end up stressing the importance of human values (especially the human values of farmers) and depending on the culture on how farmers can sometimes develop their own strategies to investigate adaptation strategies and what can be the most useful adaptation sttrategies and the best way (for them) to determine the most productive adaptation strategies and the best sources of information about climate change and variability. 

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