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Int. J. Neonatal Screen. 2018, 4(4), 33; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijns4040033

Utilising the ‘Getting to Outcomes®’ Framework in Community Engagement for Development and Implementation of Sickle Cell Disease Newborn Screening in Kaduna State, Nigeria

1
Department Evelina Children’s Hospital, Guy’s and St Thomas’ NHS Foundation Trust, London SE1 7EH, UK
2
Department of Haematology and Sickle Cell Centre, London North West University Healthcare NHS Trust and Imperial College, London NW10 7NS, UK
3
Department of Implementation Science, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC 29208, USA
4
Department of Haematology, School of Medicine , Kaduna State University, Barau Dikko Teaching Hospital, Kaduna 800212, Nigeria
5
Sickle Cell Cohort Research Foundation, WUSE Zone II, Abuja 70032, Nigeria
6
Department of Haematology, Oxford University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Oxford OX3 9DU, UK
7
Kaduna State Assembly Office, Kaduna 800212, Nigeria
8
Library Department, Kaduna State University, Kaduna 800241, Nigeria
9
Department of Pediatric Hematology-Oncology, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL 60612, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 8 October 2018 / Revised: 6 November 2018 / Accepted: 11 November 2018 / Published: 16 November 2018
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Abstract

Background: Sickle Cell Disease (SCD) has been designated by WHO as a public health problem in sub-Saharan Africa, and the development of newborn screening (NBS) is crucial to the reduction of high SCD morbidity and mortality. Strategies from the field of implementation science can be useful for supporting the translation of NBS evidence from high income countries to the unique cultural context of sub-Saharan Africa. One such strategy is community engagement at all levels of the healthcare system, and a widely-used implementation science framework, “Getting to Outcomes®” (GTO), which incorporates continuous multilevel evaluation by stakeholders about the quality of the implementation. Objectives: (1) to obtain critical information on potential barriers to NBS in the disparate ethnic groups and settings (rural and urban) in the healthcare system of Kaduna State in Nigeria; and, (2) to assist in the readiness assessment of Kaduna in the implementation of a sustainable NBS programme for SCD. Methods: Needs assessment was conducted with stakeholder focus groups for two days in Kaduna state, Nigeria, in November 2017. Results: The two-day focus group workshop had a total of 52 participants. Asking and answering the 10 GTO accountability questions provided a structured format to understand strengths and weaknesses in implementation. For example, we found a major communication gap between policy-makers and user groups. Conclusion: In a two-day community engagement workshop, stakeholders worked successfully together to address SCD issues, to engage with each other, to share knowledge, and to prepare to build NBS for SCD in the existing healthcare system. View Full-Text
Keywords: Sickle Cell Disease; ‘Getting to Outcomes’; newborn screening); sub-Saharan Africa; Nigeria; Kaduna State; implementation science; public health engagement Sickle Cell Disease; ‘Getting to Outcomes’; newborn screening); sub-Saharan Africa; Nigeria; Kaduna State; implementation science; public health engagement
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited (CC BY 4.0).
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Inusa, B.P.; Anie, K.A.; Lamont, A.; Dogara, L.G.; Ojo, B.; Ijei, I.; Atoyebi, W.; Gwani, L.; Gani, E.; Hsu, L. Utilising the ‘Getting to Outcomes®’ Framework in Community Engagement for Development and Implementation of Sickle Cell Disease Newborn Screening in Kaduna State, Nigeria. Int. J. Neonatal Screen. 2018, 4, 33.

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