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Tomography is published by MDPI from Volume 7 Issue 1 (2021). Previous articles were published by another publisher in Open Access under a CC-BY (or CC-BY-NC-ND) licence, and they are hosted by MDPI on mdpi.com as a courtesy and upon agreement with Grapho, LLC.
Open AccessPerspective

A Perspective on Cell Tracking with Magnetic Particle Imaging

1
Imaging Research Laboratories, Robarts Research Institute, University of Western Ontario, London, ON, Canada
2
Department of Medical Biophysics, University of Western Ontario, London, ON, Canada
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Tomography 2020, 6(4), 315-324; https://doi.org/10.18383/j.tom.2020.00043
Received: 10 September 2020 / Revised: 8 October 2020 / Accepted: 5 November 2020 / Published: 1 December 2020
Many labs have been developing cellular magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), using both superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) and fluorine-19 (19F)-based cell labels, to track immune and stem cells used for cellular therapies. Although SPION-based MRI cell tracking has very high sensitivity for cell detection, SPIONs are indirectly detected owing to relaxation effects on protons, producing negative magnetic resonance contrast with low signal specificity. Therefore, it is not possible to reliably quantify the local tissue concentration of SPION particles, and cell number cannot be determined. 19F-based cell tracking has high specificity for perfluorocarbon-labeled cells, and 19F signal is directly related to cell number. However, 19F MRI has low sensitivity. Magnetic particle imaging (MPI) is a new imaging modality that directly detects SPIONs. SPION-based cell tracking using MPI displays great potential for overcoming the challenges of MRI-based cell tracking, allowing for both high cellular sensitivity and specificity, and quantification of SPION-labeled cell number. Here we describe nanoparticle and MPI system factors that influence MPI sensitivity and resolution, quantification methods, and give our perspective on testing and applying MPI for cell tracking.
Keywords: magnetic particle imaging; magnetic resonance imaging; cell tracking; superparamagnetic iron oxide; quantification magnetic particle imaging; magnetic resonance imaging; cell tracking; superparamagnetic iron oxide; quantification
MDPI and ACS Style

Sehl, O.C.; Gevaert, J.J.; Melo, K.P.; Knier, N.N.; Foster, P.J. A Perspective on Cell Tracking with Magnetic Particle Imaging. Tomography 2020, 6, 315-324. https://doi.org/10.18383/j.tom.2020.00043

AMA Style

Sehl OC, Gevaert JJ, Melo KP, Knier NN, Foster PJ. A Perspective on Cell Tracking with Magnetic Particle Imaging. Tomography. 2020; 6(4):315-324. https://doi.org/10.18383/j.tom.2020.00043

Chicago/Turabian Style

Sehl, Olivia C.; Gevaert, Julia J.; Melo, Kierstin P.; Knier, Natasha N.; Foster, Paula J. 2020. "A Perspective on Cell Tracking with Magnetic Particle Imaging" Tomography 6, no. 4: 315-324. https://doi.org/10.18383/j.tom.2020.00043

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