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Co-Clinical Imaging Resource Program (CIRP): Bridging the Translational Divide to Advance Precision Medicine

1
Department of Radiology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO, USA
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Department of Radiology, Center for In Vivo Microscopy, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC, USA
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Department of Radiology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, USA
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Dan L. Duncan Comprehensive Cancer Center, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX, USA
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Vanderbilt Center for Molecular Probes—Institute of Imaging Science, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN, USA
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Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, Durham, NC, USA
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Department of Radiology, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, PA, USA
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Abramson Cancer Center, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, USA
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Department of Pharmacology, Vanderbilt School of Medicine, Nashville, TN, USA
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Department of Pathology, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, USA
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Departments of Biomedical Engineering, Diagnostic Medicine, and Oncology, Oden Institute for Computational Engineering and Sciences, Austin, TX, USA
12
Livestrong Cancer Institutes, Dell Medical School, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Tomography 2020, 6(3), 273-287; https://doi.org/10.18383/j.tom.2020.00023
Received: 3 June 2020 / Revised: 7 July 2020 / Accepted: 4 August 2020 / Published: 1 September 2020
The National Institutes of Health’s (National Cancer Institute) precision medicine initiative emphasizes the biological and molecular bases for cancer prevention and treatment. Importantly, it addresses the need for consistency in preclinical and clinical research. To overcome the translational gap in cancer treatment and prevention, the cancer research community has been transitioning toward using animal models that more fatefully recapitulate human tumor biology. There is a growing need to develop best practices in translational research, including imaging research, to better inform therapeutic choices and decision-making. Therefore, the National Cancer Institute has recently launched the Co-Clinical Imaging Research Resource Program (CIRP). Its overarching mission is to advance the practice of precision medicine by establishing consensus-based best practices for co-clinical imaging research by developing optimized state-of-the-art translational quantitative imaging methodologies to enable disease detection, risk stratification, and assessment/prediction of response to therapy. In this communication, we discuss our involvement in the CIRP, detailing key considerations including animal model selection, co-clinical study design, need for standardization of co-clinical instruments, and harmonization of preclinical and clinical quantitative imaging pipelines. An underlying emphasis in the program is to develop best practices toward reproducible, repeatable, and precise quantitative imaging biomarkers for use in translational cancer imaging and therapy. We will conclude with our thoughts on informatics needs to enable collaborative and open science research to advance precision medicine.
Keywords: co-clinical trial; preclinical PET; MR; CT; quantitative imaging; informatics; precision medicine; patient-derived tumor xenograft (PDX); genetically engineered mouse model (GEMM); cell transplant model (CTM) co-clinical trial; preclinical PET; MR; CT; quantitative imaging; informatics; precision medicine; patient-derived tumor xenograft (PDX); genetically engineered mouse model (GEMM); cell transplant model (CTM)
MDPI and ACS Style

Shoghi, K.I.; Badea, C.T.; Blocker, S.J.; Chenevert, T.L.; Laforest, R.; Lewis, M.T.; Luker, G.D.; Manning, H.C.; Marcus, D.S.; Mowery, Y.M.; Pickup, S.; Richmond, A.; Ross, B.D.; Vilgelm, A.E.; Yankeelov, T.E.; Zhou, R. Co-Clinical Imaging Resource Program (CIRP): Bridging the Translational Divide to Advance Precision Medicine. Tomography 2020, 6, 273-287. https://doi.org/10.18383/j.tom.2020.00023

AMA Style

Shoghi KI, Badea CT, Blocker SJ, Chenevert TL, Laforest R, Lewis MT, Luker GD, Manning HC, Marcus DS, Mowery YM, Pickup S, Richmond A, Ross BD, Vilgelm AE, Yankeelov TE, Zhou R. Co-Clinical Imaging Resource Program (CIRP): Bridging the Translational Divide to Advance Precision Medicine. Tomography. 2020; 6(3):273-287. https://doi.org/10.18383/j.tom.2020.00023

Chicago/Turabian Style

Shoghi, Kooresh I.; Badea, Cristian T.; Blocker, Stephanie J.; Chenevert, Thomas L.; Laforest, Richard; Lewis, Michael T.; Luker, Gary D.; Manning, H. Charles; Marcus, Daniel S.; Mowery, Yvonne M.; Pickup, Stephen; Richmond, Ann; Ross, Brian D.; Vilgelm, Anna E.; Yankeelov, Thomas E.; Zhou, Rong. 2020. "Co-Clinical Imaging Resource Program (CIRP): Bridging the Translational Divide to Advance Precision Medicine" Tomography 6, no. 3: 273-287. https://doi.org/10.18383/j.tom.2020.00023

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